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Old 05-02-2005, 05:59 AM   #196
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well, WA is like an island. an isthmus. a corinth.

pitter patter, pitter patter...

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Old 05-02-2005, 07:44 AM   #197
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ok.....in england a doona is a duvet, or a quilt. we also have bedspreads, but they are the thick blanket like things (sometimes patchwork) that go on top of a duvet or sheets. there is no such thing as a comforter here. I would agree with the previous comments. Unless it can give me a hug and a cup of tea, it performs no comforting action.
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Old 05-02-2005, 07:47 AM   #198
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another thing I don't understand is the whole calling petrol 'gas'. Surely it's liquid, not gaseous

(rhetorical question, btw :cookiemonster: )
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Old 05-02-2005, 09:17 AM   #199
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This is what the biscuits and gravy I've seen have looked like:

It's a white gravy made with sausage (American sausage, though), flour, milk, and pepper.

I've always called carbonated drinks "soft drinks," but most people I knew in Kentucky called everything "coke" and my husband (from London) calls everything "juice."

I thought for ages that when people here pronounced the Castle Mall as "Castle Mal" it was a play on words using the French word "mal" and they meant that they hated going there because it's too crowded.
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Old 05-02-2005, 09:23 AM   #200
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lol meggie. I guess Pall Mall you thought the same?

those 'buscuits' look like a dry version of dumplings to me. And the 'gravy' looks more like a white sauce or a parsley sauce

vive le difference!
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Old 05-02-2005, 09:33 AM   #201
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Quote:
Originally posted by bammo2
lol meggie. I guess Pall Mall you thought the same?

those 'buscuits' look like a dry version of dumplings to me. And the 'gravy' looks more like a white sauce or a parsley sauce

vive le difference!
I never actually made the connection between the pronunciation of "mall" and "Pall Mall."

Yeah, I always have a hard time describing biscuits, but usually say they're like a dry, less doughy dumpling. The closest thing I've found here is scones. The gravy is basically a white sauce, but more peppery and with bits of American sausage (which may not even be American, but I haven't seen the same kind of sausage here, so I'm not sure of its proper name).
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Old 05-02-2005, 09:37 AM   #202
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you see now you've described it, it actually sounds quite nice. although I don't think I'd be able to eat much of it before I felt sick
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Old 05-02-2005, 09:39 AM   #203
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meggie have you come across any food that you thought was weird since you came here?
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Old 05-02-2005, 10:01 AM   #204
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I can only eat biscuits and gravy about once a year.

I actually had jellied eel yesterday . It was by far (and unsurprisingly) the most disgusting thing I have ever put in my mouth. As far as normal foods go, though, Scotch eggs were (and still are) weird to me, as were most of the meat pies/pasties here (I guess the closest things I'd ever had in America were Hot Pockets, but they have more sauce than pasties). All the blackcurrant stuff was really strange to me at first. It seems to occupy the space taken by grape flavour in the US. We don't have squash/cordial in the US that I'm aware of, but thankfully I saw Sam drink some before I had any, so I knew better than to pour myself a huge glass of undilluted Ribena.

Now I've gotten so used to the differences that I forget what foods/words are American and which are British.
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Old 05-02-2005, 10:07 AM   #205
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I have never eaten jellied eel in all my 27 years, and I don't intend to start now

I do like black pudding though. and white pudding is nice too, although that's more of an irish thing

I never thought about the blackcurrant stuff, but I suppose we do have a lot of it. I remember being fascinated by the amount of sugary grape stuff you have in the states. The only grape stuff we really have is wine

as for scotch eggs, I bloody love them. But the mini 'party eggs' are nicer than scotch eggs, cos they've got egg mayonnaise in them instead of a whole egg

and pasties
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Old 05-02-2005, 10:54 AM   #206
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Quote:
Originally posted by bammo2

and pasties
Pasties. Now that's a word that can get you something entirely different than you expected in the US.

Although pasties the food are becoming more common here, pasties are also:



So you have to watch out where you ask for pasties!

I was chatting whit a guy online once and he was ordering his lunch -- veggie pasties -- that put a weird image in my mind!
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Old 05-02-2005, 01:35 PM   #207
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wow he was ordering veggie pasties plural for his lunch

that's a lot of pasty (they're usually pretty big)

I guess it's a bit like americans calling your arse your fanny. That's one you definitely need to be careful with in the uk

If you said you were sitting on your fanny over here, people would think you were being a wee bit too descriptive
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Old 05-02-2005, 01:54 PM   #208
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I can't stand it when adults say things like "puNkin" or "valentiMes day"

Sorry if someone mentioned that, I didn't read all of this
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Old 05-02-2005, 02:06 PM   #209
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oh yes mrs springstein, I HATE that. Same with "liBary". There is this one girl at work that always says "suposubly" and i want to smack her .


In the US we have bedspreads, comforters, and duvets. Beadspreads and comforters are similar, but a comforter is thicker and usually fancier. A duvet is something you button over a comforter (esp a down one) to protect it.

We have breakfast, lunch, and dinner or in some places breakfast, dinner, and supper.

A biscuit is sort of like a roll, but more floury and crumbly...sort of.
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Old 05-02-2005, 02:50 PM   #210
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I thought of another one.

Momentarily.

Since when did it mean 'in a short while'??????????????



Just from looking at the bloody word you can tell what it means. For a moment. Eg, "I was momentarily speechless at the stupid use of the word"

x100000000000
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