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Old 05-01-2005, 09:45 PM   #136
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Originally posted by anitram
Yes, Canada has metric and Celsius (we converted some decades ago). Our pronunciation is also decidedly "American" with some minimal exceptions. Most of our spelling is British. I have no idea how it all happened.
Which Canadians are the ones that say "aboot" for about?
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Old 05-01-2005, 10:03 PM   #137
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Originally posted by beli


So a pavement means a road unless you are pounding the pavement and then its a sidewalk? lol.

Are your roads bitumen or paved?
I guess I should ask for a definition of the words....

Bitumen meaning asphalt or tar?

And when we say a road is paved it generally just means it's not dirt or gravel. A few methods I know of for paving -- asphalt, concrete, and tar and chip.
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Old 05-01-2005, 10:10 PM   #138
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I think bitumen is tar and gravel but I'm not an expert. Its stinky black stuff when its just be laid.

We say "unsealed road" for dirt tracks. Paved is paving stones, or bricks.
Sealed is bitumen.

Are we confused yet? lol
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Old 05-01-2005, 10:38 PM   #139
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli
I think bitumen is tar and gravel but I'm not an expert. Its stinky black stuff when its just be laid.

We say "unsealed road" for dirt tracks. Paved is paving stones, or bricks.
Sealed is bitumen.

Are we confused yet? lol
Getting there!

OK, I forgot about brick or pavers....there are some brick, cobblestone, or paved with pavers roads, but those aren't used much any more (maybe in a few upscale neighbourhoods for ambiance). Most of our roads are asphalt (which would be your bitumen/sealed I think) or concrete. The tar and chip is basically a poor man's asphalt -- a base of gravel is made, then tar is spread over that, and then a thin layer of fine gravel is spread over that. Not as durable as asphalt, but much cheaper and good for little back roads in the country. I live on a tar and chip road (used to be gravel until about eight years ago)
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Old 05-01-2005, 10:48 PM   #140
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli
I think bitumen is tar and gravel but I'm not an expert. Its stinky black stuff when its just be laid.

We say "unsealed road" for dirt tracks. Paved is paving stones, or bricks.
Sealed is bitumen.

Are we confused yet? lol
I think I'm actually just as likely to say 'unpaved' as 'unsealed', though I would only ever use 'sealed'.

And I've long since given up on knowing the different types of road surfaces. I just use whatever word pops into my mind, even if it's totally wrong. I think I tend to use concrete or cement most often to describe the surface of a road.
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Old 05-01-2005, 10:53 PM   #141
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Bitumen or Asphalt - What is the difference?

In simple terms the bitumen is the black liquid that gets sprayed directly onto the road.

This is then covered with crushed stone, which stops the vehicles driving on wet, sticky bitumen.

When asked what is more commonly used, Mr Van Den Kieboom says roads are sealed using bitumen, 'bitumen is sprayed wet and we put stone across the top'.

As for asphalt, it's more like a black concrete.

"The asphalt is actually a mixture of bitumen, plus stone, plus sand, it's combined at the quarry plant then put on the roads from there.

In essence it is like black concrete but you use bitumen instead of cement powder," Mr Van Den Kieboom explains.

So the bitumen seals the road by being sprayed and covered in stone, while asphalt combines bitumen and other additives, like those used to make concrete with of course the exception of concrete powder.
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Old 05-01-2005, 11:03 PM   #142
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^ Aha! Tar and chip.
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Old 05-01-2005, 11:05 PM   #143
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I was going to guess that when you indicated tar and chip is cheap crap. Our roads are full of holes.
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Old 05-01-2005, 11:21 PM   #144
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli
I was going to guess that when you indicated tar and chip is cheap crap. Our roads are full of holes.
awww....
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Old 05-01-2005, 11:26 PM   #145
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A childrens slide = slippery dip

soda, pop = fizzy drink. Actually I noticed Bono says fizzy drink too.

Icey pole = Iced lolly (English). Dunno what USA people call them

candy (USA) = either lolly or chockie depending on what it is. They are two quite separate food groups.
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Old 05-01-2005, 11:31 PM   #146
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli
soda, pop = fizzy drink. Actually I noticed Bono says fizzy drink too.
Go Bono!

Quote:
Icey pole = Iced lolly (English). Dunno what USA people call them
I don't know what they call it either, but it's an ice block to me.

Quote:
candy (USA) = either lolly or chockie depending on what it is. They are two quite separate food groups.
I honestly do not understand the American usage of 'candy'. To me, 'candy' is a synonym for 'lolly' (or 'sweets') and can in no way be used for chocolate. A gummi snake is a lolly, but I'd accept the term candy, but a Mars or Crunchie bar is a chocolate bar, yet I understand that's 'candy' in the US.

You can't group lollies/sweets/candy together with chocolate.
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Old 05-01-2005, 11:45 PM   #147
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli
A childrens slide = slippery dip

soda, pop = fizzy drink. Actually I noticed Bono says fizzy drink too.

Icey pole = Iced lolly (English). Dunno what USA people call them

candy (USA) = either lolly or chockie depending on what it is. They are two quite separate food groups.
OK a slippery dip and an iced pole sound vaguely obscene.... Only thing I can think of that might be the US version of icey pole or iced lolly is a popsicle (frozen juice or the like on a stick).

soda, pop, tonic, coke are all used in various areas in the US (for fizzy drink).

candy -- well we have chocolates (which are, um, chocolate stuff), hard candy (I guess that would be lolly), and then other -- not chocolate but not really hard candy (stuff like pralines, non chocolate fudge, etc.).

And what is a biscuit to you?
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Old 05-01-2005, 11:48 PM   #148
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Quote:
Originally posted by indra

Only thing I can think of that might be the US version of icey pole or iced lolly is a popsicle (frozen juice or the like on a stick).
Yay, popsicle. I knew there must be a USA word for it.

Quote:
Originally posted by indra
And what is a biscuit to you?
a biscuit
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Old 05-02-2005, 12:05 AM   #149
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Quote:
Originally posted by beli


a biscuit
Arrggghhh! But what kind of food is it? What's in a biscuit? I always thought biscuits were one of those totally different in the US foods.
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Old 05-02-2005, 12:09 AM   #150
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Shortbread is a biscuit. Umm, anything baked in the oven made out of flour and sugar is probably a biscuit.

I thought people in the USA called them cookies? Like the things the Cookie Monster eats. They are biscuits.
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