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Old 09-11-2007, 11:26 AM   #1
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How will you remember 9/11 today?

It seems like it gets less press coverage as the years go by, but it still remains a vivid, harrowing memory for me.

I think I might watch United 93 again -- that was an amazing film. If I watch the DVD extra with the family members of the victims of that flight, I'll probably cry long and hard.

Never forget.
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Old 09-11-2007, 11:30 AM   #2
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Finally a 9-11 remembrance thread. I couldn't believe there wasn't one already. Regardless of any political implications behind it all or caused by it since, we should respect and remember the innocent victims. RIP
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Old 09-11-2007, 11:36 AM   #3
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I paused for a moment of silence at 8:46, 9:03, 9:59, and 10:29 this morning.
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Old 09-11-2007, 11:56 AM   #4
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There have been years where I'll read the actual thread here from that day. Other years I observe the moment of silence or listen to my morning radio show, who put aside their usual banter for the day to observe it by talking about it and replaying their broadcast from that day (they usually go off the air between 10:30 and 11, that day they stayed on until after 3pm).

This is the first year I haven't watched any 9/11 related documentaries. I cry my eyes out too much so I decided to stop.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:04 PM   #5
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Re: How will you remember 9/11 today?

Quote:
Originally posted by SeattleVertigo
It seems like it gets less press coverage as the years go by
I was just thinking that same thing earlier, and it is terribly sad.

I debated between going to class and watching the "real-time" coverage of that morning, but I went to class. I'll be watching it all day, though.

Also, I've never seen the World Trade Center movie. I think I might watch it today sometime. Either that, or Flight 93 or United 93.

Quote:
Originally posted by SeattleVertigo
Never forget.
Absolutely. Never, ever forget.

:Pray:
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:18 PM   #6
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I watched about 10 min of the real time repeat on MSNBC, I just couldn't handle it. For me it seems far too morbid to watch.

It's been on my mind all day, and I have been thinking about how I experienced that day. I was lucky, I didn't lose anyone I loved. But we all really lost people.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:30 PM   #7
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I'm replaying how I found out. I was in my 8th grade social studies class and my teacher told us that 2 planes had flown into the WTC. At that point nobody really knew what was going on. We found out within the next hour though. I remember parents coming to take their kids out of school, and not being allowed to go outside at lunch like most of us usually did. We watched news coverage most of the day. A lot of kids were afraid we were going to be attacked. That night a couple of my friends and I sat outside until sunset to talk about what happened. We were so confused and wondering what would happen to the country and how we would respond, and about all the people who walked into work or a plane on a normal Tuesday and never returned.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:33 PM   #8
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listening to ATYCLB and meditating on love and loss.

especially loss.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:36 PM   #9
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I'll never forget 9/11, but I've tried to forget some of the things that happened afterward. Like large quantities of misguided patriotism, racism and Uncle Sam's strong desire to remove our rights as citizens under the guise of homeland security.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:37 PM   #10
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this is from the documentary i keep talking about, Faith and Doubt at Ground Zero, and it strikes me as just about the most powerful thing i can think of. screw the politics, screw the war, screw the mistakes, screw the warped patriotism, screw the last 6 years.

this, to me, is what matters:

[q]These are final conversations that were recorded on cell phones, recorded on voice mail. They seem to me to be incredible texts, because they were at the moment of confronting life or death. They're so pure about the expression of love between husband and wife, between mother and child. ... When I read them, I just felt they were texts as sacred as the text that we end up having recorded, that we transmit from generation to generation.

I read these every single morning now, or most mornings, because they remind me that whatever my tradition is about, it's about this. It's about being able to express love. It's about being able to understand. Taking care of our children. It's about being in real, genuine friendships.

They just seem so real to me. ... I know all these chants because my father is a cantor. He transmitted all these ancient Jewish chants to me, so they almost naturally came out in chant. I realized, "My God, the chant that we use to read one of the Scriptures that tells the story of the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem and the burning down of that temple, those chants fit this perfectly," although that's not how I thought about it. The chant came and then I said the chant worked, which, of course, is the way a good tradition works. The chant has made them even more alive to me and then links these new texts to my traditional text, even though I don't know these people. But the fact is, we all knew these people in our own way. ...

[Singing]:

"Honey. Something terrible is happening. I don't think I'm going to make it. I love you. Take care of the children."

"Hey, Jules. It's Brian. I'm on the plane and it's hijacked and it doesn't look good. I just wanted to let you know that I love you, and I hope to see you again. If I don't, please have fun in life, and live life the best you can. Know that I love you, and no matter what, I'll see you again."

"Mommy. The building is on fire. There's smoke coming through the walls. I can't breathe. I love you, Mommy. Good-bye."
[/q]


we are all connected to the 82nd floor.

and now i might have to shut my office door and take a moment to compose myself.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:44 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by Irvine511
this is from the documentary i keep talking about, Faith and Doubt at Ground Zero, and it strikes me as just about the most powerful thing i can think of. screw the politics, screw the war, screw the mistakes, screw the warped patriotism, screw the last 6 years.

this, to me, is what matters:

[q]These are final conversations that were recorded on cell phones, recorded on voice mail. They seem to me to be incredible texts, because they were at the moment of confronting life or death. They're so pure about the expression of love between husband and wife, between mother and child. ... When I read them, I just felt they were texts as sacred as the text that we end up having recorded, that we transmit from generation to generation.

I read these every single morning now, or most mornings, because they remind me that whatever my tradition is about, it's about this. It's about being able to express love. It's about being able to understand. Taking care of our children. It's about being in real, genuine friendships.

They just seem so real to me. ... I know all these chants because my father is a cantor. He transmitted all these ancient Jewish chants to me, so they almost naturally came out in chant. I realized, "My God, the chant that we use to read one of the Scriptures that tells the story of the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem and the burning down of that temple, those chants fit this perfectly," although that's not how I thought about it. The chant came and then I said the chant worked, which, of course, is the way a good tradition works. The chant has made them even more alive to me and then links these new texts to my traditional text, even though I don't know these people. But the fact is, we all knew these people in our own way. ...

[Singing]:

"Honey. Something terrible is happening. I don't think I'm going to make it. I love you. Take care of the children."

"Hey, Jules. It's Brian. I'm on the plane and it's hijacked and it doesn't look good. I just wanted to let you know that I love you, and I hope to see you again. If I don't, please have fun in life, and live life the best you can. Know that I love you, and no matter what, I'll see you again."

"Mommy. The building is on fire. There's smoke coming through the walls. I can't breathe. I love you, Mommy. Good-bye."
[/q]


we are all connected to the 82nd floor.

and now i might have to shut my office door and take a moment to compose myself.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:52 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by Irvine511
screw the politics, screw the war, screw the mistakes, screw the warped patriotism, screw the last 6 years.

this, to me, is what matters
Yes indeed. Today is a day to honor and remember those people and forget about all of that. It's a day to connect on an emotional level, those people had nothing to do with the politics and everything else.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:53 PM   #13
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I'm heading over to my church on my lunch break. I know there aren't any services today but I know the sanctuary will be open for who ever wants to go in and pray.

I found a video that was made to Alan Jackson's "Where Were You the Day the World Stopped Turning?"

I'm sure I'll be popping that cd on as well and sit down and think back to 6 years ago.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:54 PM   #14
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I'll remember that morning for as long as I live. I was in the 8th grade, and I was sitting at home watching TV for a little while before walking to the bus stop. My mom was gone for a few minutes, taking my little sister to her bus stop. I turned on the news and saw the one tower burning. My mom came home a couple minutes later and we both started watching. Just as I was standing up to go leave, I saw the second plane hit. A few minutes later, I went to school, and we watched it on TV in almost every class. My mom now says that she should have kept me home that day, and if I had a bigger grasp of what was going on (I was only 13) I wouldn't have gone to school.

It's truly incredible. And I know I'm not the only one who can honestly say that that day changed my life. I was thinking about this earlier. God willing, I want nothing more than to work for the FBI or the DHS or the CIA when I get older, and I honestly don't think I would have such a drive and a love for country and security if 9/11 had never happened.

God Bless America, damn it.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:58 PM   #15
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I read this in the Christian Science Monitor, maybe this is a good idea.

In 9/11 remembrance, a turning to good deeds

By Alexandra Marks Mon Sep 10th

On Sept. 11, Jacob Sundberg of San Antonio has pledged to make eye contact and smile at everyone he meets. Kaitlin Ulrich will bring goody baskets to the police and fire departments in and around Philadelphia. And 100 volunteers from New York – 9/11 firefighters and family members among them – are going to Groesbeck, Texas, to rebuild a house destroyed by a tornado last December.

This is a minute sampling of the hundreds of thousands of people who have pledged to memorialize those killed on 9/11 by doing something good for others.

The heroic acts of all those killed trying to save others that September morning has spawned a growing grass-roots movement. The goal is to ensure that future generations remember not just the horror of the attacks, but also the extraordinary outpouring of humanity during the days, weeks, and months that followed.

"It was the worst possible day imaginable, and in some ways, a remarkable day, too, in the way in which people responded," says David Paine, cofounder of myGoodDeed.org. "We need to rekindle the way we came together in the spirit of 9/11: It would be almost as much a tragedy to lose that lesson."

Sept. 11 has inspired dozens of philanthropic efforts – from groups dedicated to building memorials to foundations designed to improve education in the Middle East. But myGoodDeed has a more universal goal: to turn 9/11 into a day dedicated to doing good – from small, simple things like Lisa Scheive's pledge to help stranded turtles cross the road in Pompano Beach, Fla., to lifesaving efforts, such as John Feal's decision in New York to donate one of his kidneys to help a seriously ill 9/11 worker.

The idea has been endorsed by members of Congress, and at myGoodDeed's urging, President Bush for the first time this year included a call for volunteering in his annual 9/11 proclamation.

After major disasters, Americans have historically tapped a deep reserve of compassion and reached out to others. But in the months and years that follow, those compassionate and civic urges tend to recede. Studies at Harvard's Saguaro Seminar on Civic Engagement in America found that in as few as five months after 9/11, most Americans had gone back to their daily lives and were not more engaged as they said they'd hoped to be. Part of the goal of turning 9/11 into a national day of service is to remind Americans of the inherent joy of giving and to hopefully spur volunteering and charitable acts throughout the year.

"I don't know of any research that's been done on one day of service, but studies have shown that people who do volunteering in high school are more likely to volunteer throughout their lives," says Thomas Sander, executive director of the Saguaro Seminar.

The idea of turning 9/11 into a day of service, charity, and good deeds came from the family and friends of one man: Glenn Winuk, a volunteer fireman and lawyer who worked a block and a half from the World Trade Center. After he helped evacuate his Broadway law offices, he grabbed a medic's bag and ran toward the smoke pouring from the South Tower. That's where his remains were found after the towers fell. Mr. Paine and Glenn's brother Jay had been friends for years. They decided that turning 9/11 into a day of service was best way to memorialize Glenn.

"It completely reflects the way my brother lived his life, and it also specifically reflects how he died," says Mr. Winuk, myGoodDeed.org cofounder. "He laid his life on the line for other people that day."

In 2002, Paine and Winuk sent e-mails to friends and family and suggested they do a good deed, such as donate a day's pay on 9/11. Then the idea evolved, and they founded myGoodDeed.org. In 2004, 100,000 visited their website and pledged to do a good deed on 9/11. This year, those pledging number more than 250,000.

"A lot of people don't know what to do on 9/11," says Paine. "This hits people in their heart and their soul. It connects with something that's fundamental."
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