Excerpts from Romney's speech about his religion - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind > Free Your Mind Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-06-2007, 10:50 AM   #1
War Child
 
MaxFisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 776
Local Time: 07:53 PM
Excerpts from Romney's speech about his religion

There are some who may feel that religion is not a matter to be seriously considered in the context of the weighty threats that face us. If so, they are at odds with the nation's founders, for they, when our nation faced its greatest peril, sought the blessings of the Creator. And further, they discovered the essential connection between the survival of a free land and the protection of religious freedom. In John Adam's words: 'We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. ... Our Constitution was made for a moral and religious people.' "

___

"Freedom requires religion just as religion requires freedom. Freedom opens the windows of the soul so that man can discover his most profound beliefs and commune with God. Freedom and religion endure together, or perish alone."

___

"When I place my hand on the Bible and take the oath of office, that oath becomes my highest promise to God. If I am fortunate to become your president, I will serve no one religion, no one group, no one cause, and no one interest. A president must serve only the common cause of the people of the United States."

___

"There are some who would have a presidential candidate describe and explain his church's distinctive doctrines. To do so would enable the very religious test the founders prohibited in the Constitution. No candidate should become the spokesman for his faith. For if he becomes president he will need the prayers of the people of all faiths."

___

"It is important to recognize that while differences in theology exist between the churches in America, we share a common creed of moral convictions. And where the affairs of our nation are concerned, it's usually a sound rule to focus on the latter — on the great moral principles that urge us all on a common course. Whether it was the cause of abolition, or civil rights, or the right to life itself, no movement of conscience can succeed in America that cannot speak to the convictions of religious people.

___

"We separate church and state affairs in this country, and for good reason. No religion should dictate to the state nor should the state interfere with the free practice of religion. But in recent years, the notion of the separation of church and state has been taken by some well beyond its original meaning. They seek to remove from the public domain any acknowledgment of God. Religion is seen as merely a private affair with no place in public life. It is as if they are intent on establishing a new religion in America — the religion of secularism. They are wrong.

___

"The founders proscribed the establishment of a state religion, but they did not countenance the elimination of religion from the public square. We are a nation 'Under God' and in God, we do indeed trust.

___

"We should acknowledge the Creator as did the founders — in ceremony and word. He should remain on our currency, in our pledge, in the teaching of our history, and during the holiday season, nativity scenes and menorahs should be welcome in our public places. Our greatness would not long endure without judges who respect the foundation of faith upon which our Constitution rests. I will take care to separate the affairs of government from any religion, but I will not separate us from 'the God who gave us liberty.'"

___

"These American values, this great moral heritage, is shared and lived in my religion as it is in yours. I was taught in my home to honor God and love my neighbor. I saw my father march with Martin Luther King. I saw my parents provide compassionate care to others, in personal ways to people nearby, and in just as consequential ways in leading national volunteer movements."

___

"My faith is grounded on these truths. You can witness them in Ann and my marriage and in our family. We are a long way from perfect and we have surely stumbled along the way, but our aspirations, our values, are the selfsame as those from the other faiths that stand upon this common foundation. And these convictions will indeed inform my presidency."

___

"The diversity of our cultural expression, and the vibrancy of our religious dialogue, has kept America in the forefront of civilized nations even as others regard religious freedom as something to be destroyed.

___

"In such a world, we can be deeply thankful that we live in a land where reason and religion are friends and allies in the cause of liberty, joined against the evils and dangers of the day. And you can be certain of this: Any believer in religious freedom, any person who has knelt in prayer to the Almighty, has a friend and ally in me. And so it is for hundreds of millions of our countrymen: we do not insist on a single strain of religion — rather, we welcome our nation's symphony of faith."
__________________

__________________
MaxFisher is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 01:11 PM   #2
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,997
Local Time: 02:53 PM
Would he even have made that speech if it weren't for certain conservative Christians and his need to placate them somehow-given the polls and such? I don't care one iota about his religious beliefs, I respect them but they are irrelevant to me in the job of President. No one should not vote for him just because he is a Mormon (or vote for him merely for that reason). Isn't he only calling more attention to that than it deserves?
__________________

__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 01:20 PM   #3
BVS
Blue Crack Supplier
 
BVS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: between my head and heart
Posts: 40,697
Local Time: 01:53 PM
Re: Excerpts from Romney's speech about his religion

Quote:
Originally posted by MaxFisher

"The diversity of our cultural expression, and the vibrancy of our religious dialogue, has kept America in the forefront of civilized nations even as others regard religious freedom as something to be destroyed.

Diversity? I always have to laugh when someone uses religion and deversity in the same sentence.
__________________
BVS is online now  
Old 12-06-2007, 01:45 PM   #4
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,997
Local Time: 02:53 PM
I caught the Jihadist reference. Well after all he was in favor of wiretapping mosques, but maybe he has changed his position on that too.


msnbc.com

From NBC's Mark Murray
So far, it's mostly positive...
National Review's Kate O'Beirne: "I predict it will get rave reviews. Mitt Romney, who sure looked presidential, explained effectively that he is a man of faith who is committed to America's values. He was sure-footed and polished as usual but appeared today to be fighting back strong emotions when he talked about American exceptionalism."

Ed Morrissey: "Interesting, and somewhat better than I thought. I still think that he won’t have convinced people disinclined to vote for Mormons to support him, but at least he may have made some evangelicals more comfortable with his candidacy."

National Review's Mona Charen: "That was perhaps the best political speech of the year. It was well-crafted and delivered with conviction and — this is unusual for Romney — considerable emotion. I thought his contrast of the empty cathedrals of Europe with the violent jihadis was particularly adroit. He managed to make this a speech about patriotism as much as about religion. Brilliant."

National Review's Ramesh Ponnuru: "It would have been nice if Romney, while making room for people of all faiths in this country, could have also made some room for people with none."

National Review's Jonah Goldberg: "I thought it was a very good speech too. I agree with Ramesh that the failure to mention agnostics and atheists was an oversight... The thrust of the speech was that all believers are good, all believers are Americans. That's a nice sentiment and its message of inclusion would encompass Hindus. But would it encompass non-believers? I'm sure Romney himself would say it would if asked. But he didn't say it in the speech."

The Atlantic's Andrew Sullivan (although many Republicans would not label him a conservative): "Romney flip-flopping on faith?"
"I do not define my candidacy by my religion. A person should not be elected because of his faith, nor should he be rejected because of his faith," - Mitt Romney, at the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum today.
"We need to have a person of faith lead the country," - Mitt Romney, February 17, 2007.
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 01:54 PM   #5
War Child
 
MaxFisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 776
Local Time: 07:53 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
Would he even have made that speech if it weren't for certain conservative Christians and his need to placate them somehow-given the polls and such? I don't care one iota about his religious beliefs, I respect them but they are irrelevant to me in the job of President. No one should not vote for him just because he is a Mormon (or vote for him merely for that reason). Isn't he only calling more attention to that than it deserves?
http://www.vanderbilt.edu/news/relea...o-gain-support

Mormons suffer more prejudice than most other segments of our population. As a Mormon presidential candidate, Romney has to address his religous views. I agree it's too bad that he has to. His religion shouldn't matter.
__________________
MaxFisher is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 01:56 PM   #6
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,997
Local Time: 02:53 PM
But who is the most prejudiced against them? Which voters actually care about his Mormonism?
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 02:01 PM   #7
War Child
 
MaxFisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 776
Local Time: 07:53 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
But who is the most prejudiced against them? Which voters actually care about his Mormonism?
The general public--the polling was done on a national level.
__________________
MaxFisher is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 02:11 PM   #8
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 02:53 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
I don't care one iota about his religious beliefs, I respect them but they are irrelevant to me in the job of President.
That's because you are at ODDS with the founders of your nation, duh!
__________________
anitram is online now  
Old 12-06-2007, 02:14 PM   #9
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 02:53 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by MaxFisher

Mormons suffer more prejudice than most other segments of our population.
I think this is pretty silly.
__________________
anitram is online now  
Old 12-06-2007, 02:20 PM   #10
War Child
 
MaxFisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 776
Local Time: 07:53 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by anitram


I think this is pretty silly.
Silly because you don't think it's true?
__________________
MaxFisher is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 02:28 PM   #11
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 02:53 PM
I doubt that it is true as I've never seen any kind of study indicate that Mormons are prejudiced from finding employment, advancement to upper management positions, enrollment in top universities, ability to run their own businesses, freedom to practice their religion (insofar as it accords with local laws - applicable to FLDS), and so on. The idea that some (religious?) voters would not vote for a Mormon president doesn't prejudice them in ways that Muslims, atheists, Hindus, gays and lesbians, the transgendered, single mothers of 3, the uneducated, blacks, Mexicans and other "visible minorities," maybe Jews, maybe women are also not prejudiced. If you are comparing them to straight, white, (relatively) affluent Christian men, sure they're prejudiced, but frankly no more so or little more so than most of the rest of us.
__________________
anitram is online now  
Old 12-06-2007, 02:28 PM   #12
BVS
Blue Crack Supplier
 
BVS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: between my head and heart
Posts: 40,697
Local Time: 01:53 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by MaxFisher


Silly because you don't think it's true?
I can think of groups that receive MUCH MORE prejudice.
__________________
BVS is online now  
Old 12-06-2007, 02:36 PM   #13
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 30,499
Local Time: 02:53 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen
National Review's Ramesh Ponnuru: "It would have been nice if Romney, while making room for people of all faiths in this country, could have also made some room for people with none."

National Review's Jonah Goldberg: "I thought it was a very good speech too. I agree with Ramesh that the failure to mention agnostics and atheists was an oversight... The thrust of the speech was that all believers are good, all believers are Americans. That's a nice sentiment and its message of inclusion would encompass Hindus. But would it encompass non-believers? I'm sure Romney himself would say it would if asked. But he didn't say it in the speech."
[/B]
__________________
Irvine511 is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 02:42 PM   #14
Blue Crack Addict
 
verte76's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: hoping for changes
Posts: 23,331
Local Time: 07:53 PM
I don't care that Romney is a Mormon. I wouldn't vote for or against anyone just because of their religion. Maybe some are concerned because Mormons tend to be conservative. Bill Clinton finished third in Utah in 1992. Ross Perot got more votes there than he did! But I know a liberal Mormon, one who claims she must be the only Democratic Mormon on the planet.
__________________
verte76 is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 03:04 PM   #15
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: The American Resistance
Posts: 4,754
Local Time: 01:53 PM
Simply a superb speech. A couple of my favorite lines from the complete text.
Quote:
"It is important to recognize that while differences in theology exist between the churches in America, we share a common creed of moral convictions.
Quote:
...in recent years, the notion of the separation of church and state has been taken by some well beyond its original meaning. They seek to remove from the public domain any acknowledgment of God. Religion is seen as merely a private affair with no place in public life. It is as if they are intent on establishing a new religion in America – the religion of secularism. They are wrong.
"The founders proscribed the establishment of a state religion, but they did not countenance the elimination of religion from the public square. We are a nation 'Under God' and in God, we do indeed trust.
Exactly the point I've attempted to make in various FYM threads.
Quote:
I have visited many of the magnificent cathedrals in Europe. They are so inspired … so grand … so empty. Raised up over generations, long ago, so many of the cathedrals now stand as the postcard backdrop to societies just too busy or too 'enlightened' to venture inside and kneel in prayer.
__________________

__________________
INDY500 is offline  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com