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Old 04-21-2004, 02:58 AM   #16
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From BBC
Quote:
Powell hits phone to rally allies

US Secretary of State Colin Powell says he has been phoning every member of the coalition in Iraq to rally support.

It follows the decisions by Spain and Honduras to pull out their troops - a move Mr Powell said others may follow.

He has been reassured by Australia and Japan, which said they had no plans to withdraw their forces.

But the BBC's John Leyne says it is not yet clear whether there will be any more defections - unconfirmed reports say Poland might consider pulling out.

Warsaw may withdraw its contingent of 2,400 troops when their current commitment ends in September, our correspondent says.

Mr Powell must have made more than 30 calls - showing the depth of American concern, he says.

The secretary of state said he was getting solid support from the other members of the coalition for the American-led effort, and a series of commitments to finish the job.

...
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Old 04-21-2004, 04:16 PM   #17
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Oops...looks like Poland is staying.....oh the horror they are not falling apart.

[Q]Apr 21, 11:53 AM (ET)

By BEATA PASEK

(AP) People pass a U.S. Army vehicle while returning to their homes in Fallujah, Iraq Wednesday, April...
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WARSAW, Poland (AP) - Poland is not considering a troop pullout from Iraq, despite the outgoing prime minister's comments on the subject, the government spokesman said on Wednesday.

"Poland will be in Iraq as long as it necessary, until the situation there is stabilized," spokesman Marcin Kaszuba told The Associated Press. "Poland has not and is not considering a troop withdrawal."

Earlier, the Polish news agency PAP quoted Prime Minister Leszek Miller, who leaves office early next month, as saying Poland "cannot turn a blind eye" to the Spanish pullout. The comments suggested Warsaw might be rethinking its Iraq mission.

But Kaszuba said Miller only meant to restate the government's position "that the government is not considering increasing its contingent" in Iraq.

Poland leads a multinational force of 9,500 troops in central Iraq, including 2,400 Polish troops. The 1,300 Spanish troops that the new Madrid government is withdrawing are in the same sector.

Spain plans to bring home all its troops within six weeks. Following the Spanish lead, Honduras and the Dominican Republic said they too would remove troops soon.

Miller told PAP that the Spanish pullout was a problem that required decisions. He said his government was discussing the issue with the Americans.

"We will not make any rash gestures," Miller told PAP, apparently referring to the fact that the Spanish pullout was announced hours after Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero was sworn in Sunday. "The final decision about the pullout will be agreed and thought over, but the problem exists."

"We cannot turn a blind eye to the fact that Spain and others are leaving Iraq," he was quoted as saying. "I cannot say when we will leave Iraq, but I am sure the new prime minister will be more precise."

Miller is stepping down on May 2. His likely successor is Marek Belka, who has said Polish troops will stay in Iraq until the situation stabilizes. Until last month, Belka directed economic policy in Iraq for the U.S.-led coalition.

The Polish-led multinational troops are stationed in south-central Iraq, which in recent weeks has become the center of a violent uprising by followers of radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr.

The 23-nation force now regularly comes under attack - overnight, the insurgents fired mortars at a Spanish base in Najaf. [/Q]

Now what will we use to show the administration in a bad light?
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Old 04-21-2004, 04:58 PM   #18
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Dreadsox:
with my above posting i wanted to show that Mr. Powell (a man i respect verry much) fixed the problem and the situation seems to be under control.
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Old 04-21-2004, 06:02 PM   #19
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Originally posted by Klaus
Dreadsox:
with my above posting i wanted to show that Mr. Powell (a man i respect verry much) fixed the problem and the situation seems to be under control.
I got that...my post was directed more at the Poland withdrawing article from yesterday.
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Old 04-22-2004, 04:09 PM   #20
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US losing face as Poles waver

From agency correspondents in Washington and Baghdad
23apr04

PENTAGON chiefs are drawing up emergency plans for more troops and money in Iraq as the US-led coalition continues to splinter in the face of insurgent violence.

Poland sent mixed signals about its troop commitment yesterday after the Dominican Republic followed Spain and Honduras in announcing that it would withdraw its troops from the country.
Wednesday's co-ordinated car bombings in the southern city of Basra rocked the coalition because the British-controlled south had been an area of relative calm.

The toll from the attack rose from 68 to 73, including at least 20 schoolchildren, yesterday after five of the wounded died. Some coalition officials said the attacks bore the hallmarks of al-Qa'ida.

"This is a serious situation," General Richard Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the US Congress yesterday. "We're at war. We have a lot at stake against these extremists in Iraq."

General Myers gave one of the most candid official assessments yet of events in Iraq, marking a further turn from the Bush administration's stance that a smaller US force coupled with Iraqi security forces could secure the country.

He said General John Abizaid, commander of US forces in Iraq, was assessing what additional forces might be needed on top of the 135,000 US troops already there.

US troops this month have endured the worst casualties of the year-old campaign, with 100 killed. More than 700 have died since the war began.

General Myers also revealed that the cost of the war had increased to $US4.7 billion ($6.44 billion) a month.

British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said last night he expected the UN Security Council to approve a new resolution for Iraq in May.

The surge in violence has come at a political cost to the Bush administration, with hawkish Republicans calling for the head of Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld.

One influential Republican senator has even urged the White House to consider reinstating the draft.

Secretary of State Colin Powell and National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice have spent the past two days phoning coalition partners to check their commitment. Britain, Poland, Japan, Italy and Portugal all remained strong, White House spokesman Scott McClellan said.

But there is doubt about Poland's commitment after Leszek Miller, the outgoing Prime Minister, suggested the Government was having second thoughts. "We cannot turn a blind eye to the fact that Spain and others are leaving Iraq," he said.

Honduras, with 360 troops, and the Dominican Republic, with 300, exploited Spain's decision to withdraw its 1300 troops to make their own moves. Both Britain and Australia, with 7500 and 800 troops in Iraq respectively, have vowed to stay the course - but have not offered more personnel.

As a result the Pentagon is drawing up contingency plans to either maintain US forces in Iraq at 135,000 or to increase numbers over the northern summer. Many families are unhappy that 20,000 troops due home this month have had duties extended by 90 days.

But US President George W.Bush said yesterday: "The Iraqi people are looking at America and saying are we going to cut and run again? We're not going to cut and run if I'm in the Oval Office. We will do our job,"
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