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Old 03-13-2005, 08:58 AM   #16
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Originally posted by Rono
When it means to catch up with the numbers off the people without health care, old age pension,. education, normal income,...please don`t catch up Old Europe.
I think a lot of these problems can be traced to the state of K-12 education in the US...but that's another thread entirely.

The US still offers a better climate in which a lot of businesses can thrive -- this includes cutting-edge tech firms and union-busting retail megachains alike.
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Old 03-13-2005, 09:25 AM   #17
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The EU's biggest problem right now probably has to do with their notorious anti-immigrant attitudes. This will change, sooner or later, because Europe is in a population decline and, for better or for worse, asylum seekers generally don't pay the bills and someone will have to contribute money to the social programs.

Honestly? If the EU wanted to stick it to the U.S., they could suddenly roll out a series of new business incentives that make it very cheap to set up shop there, and then roll out more programs to attract our educated and creative types. There's a lot of discontent here amongst these demographics.

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Old 03-13-2005, 01:01 PM   #18
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Melon-good to see you.

Your anti-immigrant comment is right in one way but wrong in another. I dont think EU like immigrants (ie asians, africans, NA) I think that will change as cultures become more multicultural. England is a good example, they are very multicultural, but when you look at Ireland where they have allways seen emigration but now for the first time they are seeing large amounts of immigration it takes time to adjust.

But the EU as a whole is quite easy to get into. If you have a grandparent that was born in the EU then your automatically in. That covers about 50% of people. Countries like Canada and US have massive amount of EU decendents. So on that issue i believe that it can be easy enough to get a passport.
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Old 03-13-2005, 02:30 PM   #19
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Huh?? Europe has anti-immigrant problems? Heck..an awful lot of Germans living in Turkey, and quite content to srty, in sopite of the occasional riot or rumblings from the native-born.

The problem is yes, the US still invents a lot of great things, new technologies, etc, but increasing amounts of the averge "middle class" can't afford them, whether it's iPds of the latest in health care technology or the latest home entertainment gadget. It's not just the dollar being low. It;s more serious long-term weaknesses--more sikleed entry-level jobs de\isappearing, manufacturing jobd being converted to service jobs that are dead-end and poorly paid, (for example: one third of all US adults aged 18-24 have no health insurance AT ALL and another 25% have substandard insurance that lacks such things as dental etc). So half the US population of college age and just above has NO ACCESSto health care, outeide of the emergency room or paying it temselves. A night in a hospital room is $5000--IF they can find one. (More than 100 hospitals have closed since 1990, and 100,000 beds have vanished.) Our Glorious Leader has just passed not toolong ago a bill that effectively denies any access to health care AT ALL for Native Americans on reservations on weekends(the clincs have "not enough funding" and are now being closed Fridays to Sundays.)

And Speedracer...foreign enrollemtn in schools that you boast of has dropped by a thrid in the past 2 yrs. It seems large amounts of Asian and other imigrants are not waiting 2 or more yrs of their lives to see if the HS office declares them a potential terririst or not. They are flocking to Oxford and the Sorbonne etc. Have you read Businessweek, a staunchly conservative mag, any time this year?
Chew on that for awhile.
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Old 03-13-2005, 02:58 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by bonoman
But the EU as a whole is quite easy to get into. If you have a grandparent that was born in the EU then your automatically in. That covers about 50% of people. Countries like Canada and US have massive amount of EU decendents. So on that issue i believe that it can be easy enough to get a passport.
I wish that extended to "great-grandparents," because then I'd qualify.

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Old 03-13-2005, 03:05 PM   #21
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Originally posted by Teta040

And Speedracer...foreign enrollemtn in schools that you boast of has dropped by a thrid in the past 2 yrs. It seems large amounts of Asian and other imigrants are not waiting 2 or more yrs of their lives to see if the HS office declares them a potential terririst or not. They are flocking to Oxford and the Sorbonne etc. Have you read Businessweek, a staunchly conservative mag, any time this year?
I realize this. An Iranian student who was admitted to my own department had trouble entering the country and eventually gave up. As far as I can tell, the people that are having the biggest difficulties are from the Middle East. But the effect of our homeland security policies on the enrollment of foreign graduate students is the subject of yet another thread.
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Old 03-13-2005, 09:31 PM   #22
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Whoever 'Eurochambres' really are, those nutty leftists at the World Economic Forum (Davos) apparently don't share their glum view of Europe's economic prospects. The latest edition of their annual Global Competitiveness Index, a ranking of the world's most competitive economies, puts Finland--with its extensive welfare state--ahead of the US at #1. (Sweden and Denmark also made the top 5; Norway, Switzerland and Iceland the top 10; and the UK, Netherlands and Germany the top 15.)


The WEF's GCI has three main legs: the overall quality of a country's economy at the macro level (e.g., budget surpluses good, deficits bad); the state of its public institutions, which includes such measures as the independence of the judiciary and the level of public sector corruption; and the level of its technological innovation.

Finland scores well on all three sub-indexes, ranking third in each. The U.S., in contrast, is easily No. 1 for technological innovation, but its overall ranking is dragged down by being 15th on the macroeconomic environment ranking, one place below Australia, and 21st on the public institutions sub-index, one place below Chile.

Finland is given high marks for prudently running budget surpluses in preparation for the future claims on its social security, pension and health care systems expected to be incurred as its population ages.

The top of the CGI rankings is remarkably stable. Good habits become self-reinforcing and self-rewarding. Finland is No.1 for the third year in four, and nine of the top ten this year are repeats from last year.


(source: Forbes.com 13.10.04)
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Old 03-14-2005, 02:33 PM   #23
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Yes Europe is behind looking at many economical factors, but do we care about that????
I don't think many Europeans would want to catch up with America if that would mean working 49 or 50 weeks a year making 50+ hours a week, losing our socail security system (which I agree, does have to change and is also is changing)
Sure, our economy would probably benefit from it. The Eurochambres people would probably like it, but most other people in Europe will then be very happy to just stay behind...
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