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Old 04-06-2007, 01:15 AM   #91
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The following two articles are brought to you by methamphetamine:

Quote:
Man chronicles his death by meth use
35-year-old made documentary to warn others off highly addictive drug


Associated Press

Updated: 6:29 p.m. CT March 27, 2007
ST. LOUIS - A former trucker whose documentary chronicled an agonizing descent as methamphetamine ravaged his body has died, optimistic to the end that his story would keep others from the highly addictive stimulant.

“He was extremely satisfied, wanting to do more in getting the word out and showing kids what meth harm does. We didn’t get to that point,” his father, Jack Bridges, said shortly after the 35-year-old died Monday at a hospital in Cape Girardeau.

“He didn’t want anyone to go through what he did,” his father said.

Shawn Bridges drew global attention last year for “No More Sunsets,” a 29-minute film shot by a former southern Illinois television videographer at Bridges’ request.

By his family’s account, Bridges already had died at least twice, his heart so damaged by years of using meth — a concoction that can include toxic chemicals such as battery acid, drain cleaner and fertilizer — that it stopped and had to be shocked back into beating.

The documentary shows Bridges mostly bedridden, his constant companions a catheter and feeding tube.

“I’d say he’s got a 34-year-old body on the outside with a 70-to 80-year-old man on the inside,” his father told The Associated Press last May.

Roughly 28,000 people sought treatment for meth addiction across the country in 1993, accounting for nearly 2 percent of admissions for drug-abuse care, according to the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Just a decade later, the meth-related admissions numbered nearly 136,000 — more than 7 percent of the national total for drug-abuse treatment.

Haunted by brother's death
Family members have said Bridges had been haunted by the dreary day in 1976 when his younger brother Jason, barely a year old, died in a car wreck. Shawn was 4 and nowhere near the accident but still blamed himself, wanting to trade places with his dead sibling, his father said.

A lenient upbringing set Bridges on the road to becoming “a little monster,” his father said. “By 16, the kid was a high school dropout and partier.”

At 26, Bridges had a heart attack that his father blamed on meth’s ability to damage a chronic user’s heart and other internal organs. Bridges learned he had congestive heart failure. Twice, he tried to kill himself, according to family members.

During his final months in a hospital bed, Shawn’s words slurred to guttural sounds when he tried to talk. At times, he spit up blood, and his weight fell dangerously when he couldn’t keep food down. His father said Monday that Bridges developed a urinary tract infection shortly before he died.

“I don’t think people will forget what got him to this point,” said Chip Rossetti, who filmed the documentary. “But what he did with his condition is really the amazing thing.”

Rossetti said 500 to 600 copies of the documentary have been sold, some going as far as Australia. Bridges was also profiled on German television. Rossetti said Monday he plans a sequel, chronicling Bridge’s final year and testimonials by people touched by his awareness effort.

“We wanted to keep him with us a lot longer, but we appreciate God’s good grace,” Jack Bridges said after his son’s death. “We’ll still be trying to drive home the point that these drugs are poison, and that people using them are heading the same place Shawn has gone.”


James A. Finley / AP
Shawn Bridges rests in his bed in the living room of his father's house in Cape Girardeau, Mo., last year. Bridges, whose documentary about how methamphetamine ravaged his body drew global attention, died Monday.
And from my part of the country...

Quote:
Alabama woman on horseback charged with DUI

4/4/2007, 6:41 p.m. CDT
The Associated Press

SYLVANIA, Ala. (AP) — A woman who went for a horseback ride through town at midnight and allegedly used the horse to ram a police car was charged with driving under the influence and drug offenses, police said Tuesday.

"Cars were passing by having to avoid it, and almost hitting the horse," said Police Chief Brad Gregg.

He said DUI charges can apply even when the vehicle has four legs instead of wheels.

Police in the northeast Alabama town received a call around midnight Saturday about someone riding a horse on a city street, Gregg said.

Officer John Seals found Melissa Byrum York, 40, of Henagar on horseback on a nearby road and attempted to stop her. Seals asked the woman repeatedly to get off the horse, but she kept trying to kick the animal to make it run, the chief said.

"She wouldn't stop. She kept riding the horse and going on," Gregg said.

After ramming the police car with the horse and riding away, the woman tried to jump off but caught her foot in a stirrup, Gregg said. The officer took the woman into custody and discovered that she had crystal methamphetamine, a small amount of marijuana, pills and a small pipe, the chief said.

York was charged with DUI for allegedly riding the horse under the influence of a controlled substance. She was also charged with drug possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, resisting arrest, assault, attempting to elude police and cruelty to animals.

Gregg said the horse, which belonged to York, "wasn't in the best of health, but it's still alive."

York was released from the DeKalb County Jail on $4,000 bond and was being transferred to the jail in Jackson County, where authorities had a warrant for her arrest on unrelated charges, Gregg said.

Jackson County officials said Tuesday that York had yet to be booked, and there were no records indicating whether she had a lawyer.
Ahhh, it's just meth though; people just wanting to have a little fun...

Yes, we really need to make this shit more easily available!

~U2Alabama
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:01 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally posted by U2Bama
The following two articles are brought to you by methamphetamine:

Yes, we really need to make this shit more easily available!

~U2Alabama
Legalised, regulated, and taxed, with the tax monies going to treatment, would indeed be better than the current "system." Legalisation isn't about making drugs easily accessible, it's simply understanding there is a demand for these drugs and given that demand it will be met. Much better it be met in a relatively safe (and yes I do know there really is no "safe" form of meth) manner, both for the user and for people unwittingly endangered by illicit meth labs.
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:08 PM   #93
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The major problem I see with "legalization, regulation, etc." is that if the state is essentially sponsoring the distribution of drugs (for profit), what happens to secondary victims? For example, a parent who has children in their custody is legally allowed to purchase meth and get high out of their mind. Does the child now have a civil action against the state? Children have been successful in recovering from their mothers who were battered wives for a failure to leave the husband, because of the physical and/or emotional harm suffered. Why would this be any different?
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Old 04-06-2007, 09:25 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally posted by anitram
The major problem I see with "legalization, regulation, etc." is that if the state is essentially sponsoring the distribution of drugs (for profit), what happens to secondary victims? For example, a parent who has children in their custody is legally allowed to purchase meth and get high out of their mind. Does the child now have a civil action against the state? Children have been successful in recovering from their mothers who were battered wives for a failure to leave the husband, because of the physical and/or emotional harm suffered. Why would this be any different?
Well how does it work with pain killers?
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Old 04-06-2007, 09:26 PM   #95
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Quote:
Originally posted by U2Bama

Ahhh, it's just meth though; people just wanting to have a little fun...

Yes, we really need to make this shit more easily available!

~U2Alabama
That's extremely sad. But I can also show you the downfall and demise of an alcoholic or a smoker, in the same manner.
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Old 04-06-2007, 09:43 PM   #96
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Quote:
Originally posted by BonoVoxSupastar


Well how does it work with pain killers?
Pain killers are not prescribed for the purpose of maintaining somebody's chemical addiction. They have a legitimate medical purpose. If somebody becomes addicted to them, that is a secondary effect. But nobody is prescribing pain killers for the sake of furthering an addiction (even things like methadone have the purpose of weaning you off, not maintaining your addiction).
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Old 04-06-2007, 09:46 PM   #97
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Quote:
Originally posted by anitram


Pain killers are not prescribed for the purpose of maintaining somebody's chemical addiction. They have a legitimate medical purpose. If somebody becomes addicted to them, that is a secondary effect. But nobody is prescribing pain killers for the sake of furthering an addiction (even things like methadone have the purpose of weaning you off, not maintaining your addiction).
Well I understand that, but what stops someone from suing for the secondary effect?
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:00 PM   #98
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In the US, or in any other country?
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:05 PM   #99
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Well I'm just opening the question to anyone or anyplace...
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:14 PM   #100
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Here they would have no chance.

First, it's common knowledge that painkillers can make addictive. So it's also your own responsibility.
Second, if the painkillers are available only on prescription the doctor will tell you about the risk. Additionally there will be a warning in the description.

If it's available without prescription there will be the warning, and for TV and radiospots or print there is a disclaimer mandatory.

So, you would not get a case before the court.
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:39 PM   #101
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Quote:
Originally posted by indra


Legalised, regulated, and taxed, with the tax monies going to treatment, would indeed be better than the current "system." Legalisation isn't about making drugs easily accessible, it's simply understanding there is a demand for these drugs and given that demand it will be met. Much better it be met in a relatively safe (and yes I do know there really is no "safe" form of meth) manner, both for the user and for people unwittingly endangered by illicit meth labs.
Whether or not the purpose of legalization is to make harmful narcotics, opiates and chemical coctails more accessible is not entirely my point - it will make them more accessible, but also more acceptable, which will introduce them to larger numbers of curious people who will potentially get hooked, whereas they may have never tried them if illegal.

"Meth labs" are not the only danger associated with meth; you also have the societal risks that the users (not the manufacturers) pose to other people. anitram brought up a good point about the risk you are putting on the children of drug users; news accounts of crack users selling their kids or otherwise putting them in dangerous situations certainly won't go away by making crack more accessihble and acceptable.

~U2Alabama
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:44 PM   #102
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Quote:
Originally posted by BonoVoxSupastar


Well I understand that, but what stops someone from suing for the secondary effect?
I agree with anitram on this...the painkillers serve a legitimate medical purpose; all of these other drugs we are talking about legalizing are not even for the purpose of sustaining someone's addicition; we are talking about legalizing them for simple recreational use, not any medical benefit. To introduce something else addictive (while we already have alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, etc.) just seems like the wrong direction to take.

Quote:
Originally posted by BonoVoxSupastar


That's extremely sad. But I can also show you the downfall and demise of an alcoholic or a smoker, in the same manner.
I'm sure you can; I can too. Remember, I agree with you on the whole tobacco issue and second hand smoke.

But why do we need to introduce more paths to addiction to mainstream retail society?



~U2Alabama
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:56 PM   #103
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Quote:
Originally posted by U2Bama


I agree with anitram on this...the painkillers serve a legitimate medical purpose; all of these other drugs we are talking about legalizing are not even for the purpose of sustaining someone's addicition; we are talking about legalizing them for simple recreational use, not any medical benefit.
Not entirely true; some do have medical benefits and some were even medical drugs to begin with, i.e. extasy
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Old 04-06-2007, 11:02 PM   #104
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Old 04-06-2007, 11:05 PM   #105
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Quote:
Originally posted by BonoVoxSupastar


Well I understand that, but what stops someone from suing for the secondary effect?
Vincent Vega answered this already quite well. The manufacturers meet their duty and standard of care, therefore there is no suit.

I don't know that drug use should be criminalized (addicts need treatment, not jail) but I'm really not convinced that the state delivering drugs for profit and either maintaining addictions or starting them has any kind of social utility.

If it were up to me, smoking would be banned as well, so I'm an equal opportunity freedom-restricter.
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