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Old 03-13-2003, 11:17 AM   #46
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Originally posted by Sicy
She wont be answering your question melon.
Ah...then I can only guess what her fate was.

Anyhow, this is still a great thread. Let's move on with the original purpose of this thread, shall we?

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Old 03-13-2003, 12:27 PM   #47
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Whew. B-bye now.
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Old 03-13-2003, 12:34 PM   #48
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this is a very interesting thread!

I was raised Roman Catholic and am technically a full member of the church (I was confirmed and all that), but I generally consider myself to be agnostic. I believe it's possible that a supreme being exists but also possible that one doesn't. I only go to church on Christmas (because my whole family goes) and for funerals. I'm rather cynical of organized religion (sometimes I think it causes more problems than it's worth, and I can't stand how issues like gay rights and family planning get attacked by the religious right), but I have no problem with people who strongly hold genuine beliefs.

As for what caused me to become this way spiritually, that's kind of tricky. Even though I was raised Catholic, my family wasn't very religious. My dad never goes to church (I figure his beliefs are pretty close to mine, although we've never discussed it), and although my mom does attend church regularly religion was never stressed in our household. I've also become more skeptical of religion as I've progressed through my education, for example, reading parts of the Bible for a literature class was particularly enlightening in terms of seeing the Bible as a political work.

(Btw, I'm 20.)
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Old 03-13-2003, 05:46 PM   #49
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I believe that there's someone out there and it's unimportant if we call him God, Jehova or Allah.

I left the Lutheran Church because i had the feeling they weren't doing what they were preaching.

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Old 03-13-2003, 07:23 PM   #50
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Re: this is a very interesting thread!

Quote:
Originally posted by Giant Lemon
I'm rather cynical of organized religion (sometimes I think it causes more problems than it's worth, and I can't stand how issues like gay rights and family planning get attacked by the religious right), but I have no problem with people who strongly hold genuine beliefs.
Nicely put...that's how I feel, too.

Angela
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Old 03-14-2003, 09:35 PM   #51
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I presume when people say they believe in a God, they are talking about an omniscient, omnipotent, creator of the Universe. In this sense, I don't believe in a God because I don't think there is a creator or a universal consciousness looking after mankind or all of life for that matter. I do believe in the law of energy conservation, i.e. energy can not be created nor destroyed. Therefore, I view everything in our universe as a manifestation of this energy. This energy is what unites us all, not just human beings, but all of life. I'm not sure if this energy is finite or infinite, but it always gets recycled.

How did the universe get started? I don't think there was a beginning, what you see now has always been, just in a different form. I think our universe has gone through several big bangs and then reversed itself. I see it as one big cycle, where you have this extremely, dense, hot matter which explodes, but reaches a certain limit at which time it reverses. Where the end and beginning is arbitrary, it really is anywhere you want it to be. I think humans were formed from a chance combination of molecules, I know the probabilites of this are extremely slim. However, I think all the probabilities are explored and we only come to observe this slim probability because we wouldn't be around to observe the other ones.

I view spirituality or religion as an essential, otherwise there is no way to justify our existence. Truly, our time as human beings are finite and whatever we may accomplish will be meaningless on a longer time scale. As a result, it is absolutely necessary to link our finite existence to something that is immortal. For me, realizing myself as part of this energy gives me an escape from this finiteness conundrum.

As many have mentioned before me, human beings are essentially flawed. However, holding onto this as a crutch is pathetic. I think we should strive for perfection and I know we can get close to it if we really want to. Instead of being forgiven for sins, we don't have to sin in the first place. There are always choices, but if you stand by the truth there is no need to be forgiven. I suppose it gets a little bit tricky if your meaning of truth changes after time.

I grew up going to religious gatherings and to temple with my parents, but I didn't get much out of it because I never understood the language of the teachings. One thing that really bothered me about these gatherings was how everyone was so extravagently dressed with all this jewelry. I'm not sure if that's similar to the way it is in churches, but I saw this worldliness as a big hipocracy. In my mind, if you're going some place to observe something as grand as a God, you must let go of your own vanity first.

My mother is very religious and I'd like to say she's a Hindu but she's very much into Sikhism and Christianity also. At home, she used to perform many rituals but I thought it was a bunch of hokey stuff. It seemed very mythical and unrealistic, so I couldn't relate to it. The only way I can believe in something is if it is logical and intuitive. However, this does not mean I need proof of a God to believe in this entity in a classical sense. Because looking for any scientific evidence or proof of something infinite is self-defeating.

As for religious texts on God, I believe none of them are sacred. After all, they are created by humans and we tend to have different translations. This is not to say they are useless, because each one has some good advice to offer. I believe the main purpose of these books are to learn about some fundamental truths, and once you realize them the books hold no value. It's not just a matter of reading and hearing about them, but actually feeling and practicing them.
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Old 03-14-2003, 09:53 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally posted by qball7200
One thing that really bothered me about these gatherings was how everyone was so extravagently dressed with all this jewelry. I'm not sure if that's similar to the way it is in churches, but I saw this worldliness as a big hipocracy. In my mind, if you're going some place to observe something as grand as a God, you must let go of your own vanity first.
I never thought about that before...interesting point, I totally agree.

Quote:
Originally posted by qball7200
As for religious texts on God, I believe none of them are sacred. After all, they are created by humans and we tend to have different translations. This is not to say they are useless, because each one has some good advice to offer. I believe the main purpose of these books are to learn about some fundamental truths, and once you realize them the books hold no value. It's not just a matter of reading and hearing about them, but actually feeling and practicing them.
This makes sense.

Your whole post is interesting...you have some unique views on religion.

Angela
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Old 03-19-2003, 02:11 PM   #53
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I don't believe in God, but I am afraid of him. So I'll pray.
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Old 03-19-2003, 06:53 PM   #54
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by DebbieSG
...Allah is some demon that infected your leader, like Adam Smith or whover is the founder of the Mormons here in the States.

As a practicing member of The Church Of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (a.k.a. "Mormons") I resent the above and its implications. Please show some respect for other people's beliefs and religion.

BTW, the man's name was Joseph Smith.
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