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Old 06-30-2008, 10:48 PM   #61
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^Once when I was in high school, I snuck out of my house late at night because a me and friend were going to play a prank on some other friends. I was dressed in black and I snuck out of the house, and jumped in my friend's truck and off we drove. Pretty soon we realized we were being followed. We tried to evade the guy, but we couldn't. We got scared and drove to my friends house, where as we were pulling into the driveway, I finally recognized the vehicle as belonging to our next door neighbor.

I went over to talk to him and sheepishly explained that I'd snuck out of the house to play a prank and "pleaes, don't tell my mom." He told me he didn't recognize me and though my friend and I were burglars, so he chased us.

I'm just kinda glad my neighbor wasn't the guy in the story deep posted. Otherwise I might not be here to tell this story.
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Old 07-01-2008, 03:28 AM   #62
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I don't know what state you were in,
but if it was Texas your neighbor could have shot and killed you both.

And most likely got credit for stopping two criminals.
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Old 07-01-2008, 04:49 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deep View Post
I don't know what state you were in,
but if it was Texas your neighbor could have shot and killed you both.

And most likely got credit for stopping two criminals.
True that. I was in Florida.
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Old 07-01-2008, 08:23 AM   #64
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Yes that Texas case is scary, don't know what's going on there

ATLANTA, Georgia, (AP) -- The Supreme Court's landmark ruling on gun ownership last week focused on citizens' ability to defend themselves from intruders in their homes. But research shows that surprisingly often, gun owners use the weapons on themselves.

Suicides accounted for 55 percent of the nation's nearly 31,000 firearm deaths in 2005, the most recent year for which statistics are available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There was nothing unique about that year -- gun-related suicides have outnumbered firearm homicides and accidents for 20 of the last 25 years. In 2005, homicides accounted for 40 percent of gun deaths. Accidents accounted for 3 percent. The remaining 2 percent included legal killings, such as when police do the shooting, and cases that involve undetermined intent.

Public-health researchers have concluded that in homes where guns are present, the likelihood that someone in the home will die from suicide or homicide is much greater.

Studies have also shown that homes in which a suicide occurred were three to five times more likely to have a gun present than households that did not experience a suicide, even after accounting for other risk factors.

In a 5-4 decision, the high court on Thursday struck down a handgun ban enacted in the District of Columbia in 1976 and rejected requirements that firearms have trigger locks or be kept disassembled. The ruling left intact the district's licensing restrictions for gun owners.

One public-health study found that suicide and homicide rates in the district dropped after the ban was adopted. The district has allowed shotguns and rifles to be kept in homes if they are registered, kept unloaded and taken apart or equipped with trigger locks.

The American Public Health Association, the American Association of Suicidology and two other groups filed a legal brief supporting the district's ban. The brief challenged arguments that if a gun is not available, suicidal people will just kill themselves using other means.

More than 90 percent of suicide attempts using guns are successful, while the success rate for jumping from high places was 34 percent. The success rate for drug overdose was 2 percent, the brief said, citing studies.

"Other methods are not as lethal," said Jon Vernick, co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research in Baltimore.

The high court's majority opinion made no mention of suicide. But in a dissenting opinion, Justice Stephen Breyer used the word 14 times in voicing concern about the impact of striking down the handgun ban.

"If a resident has a handgun in the home that he can use for self-defense, then he has a handgun in the home that he can use to commit suicide or engage in acts of domestic violence," Breyer wrote.

Researchers in other fields have raised questions about the public-health findings on guns.

Gary Kleck, a researcher at Florida State University's College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, estimates there are more than 1 million incidents each year in which firearms are used to prevent an actual or threatened criminal attack.

Public-health experts have said the telephone survey methodology Kleck used likely resulted in an overestimate. iReport.com: Watch William Bernstein share his views on gun ownership

Both sides agree there has been a significant decline in the last decade in public-health research into gun violence.

The CDC traditionally was a primary funder of research on guns and gun-related injuries, allocating more than $2.1 million a year to such projects in the mid-1990s.

But the agency cut back research on the subject after Congress in 1996 ordered that none of the CDC's appropriations be used to promote gun control.

Vernick said the Supreme Court decision underscores the need for further study into what will happen to suicide and homicide rates in the district when the handgun ban is lifted.

Today, the CDC budgets less than $900,000 for firearm-related projects, and most of it is spent to track statistics. The agency no longer funds gun-related policy analysis.
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Old 07-01-2008, 06:55 PM   #65
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^Kind of gives a different spin on the Charlton Heston quote about "my cold dead hands", huh.

But hey. Long live liberty! If a man wants to kill himself, he ought to be able to do so in as quick and efficient a way as possible without the government acting on the behalf of pesky loved ones and such to make it more difficult.
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Old 07-01-2008, 07:07 PM   #66
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Quote:
Public-health researchers have concluded that in homes where guns are present, the likelihood that someone in the home will die from suicide or homicide is much greater.

Studies have also shown that homes in which a suicide occurred were three to five times more likely to have a gun present than households that did not experience a suicide, even after accounting for other risk factors.

In a 5-4 decision, the high court on Thursday struck down a handgun ban enacted in the District of Columbia in 1976 and rejected requirements that firearms have trigger locks or be kept disassembled. The ruling left intact the district's licensing restrictions for gun owners.

One public-health study found that suicide and homicide rates in the district dropped after the ban was adopted. The district has allowed shotguns and rifles to be kept in homes if they are registered, kept unloaded and taken apart or equipped with trigger locks.

The American Public Health Association, the American Association of Suicidology and two other groups filed a legal brief supporting the district's ban. The brief challenged arguments that if a gun is not available, suicidal people will just kill themselves using other means.

More than 90 percent of suicide attempts using guns are successful, while the success rate for jumping from high places was 34 percent. The success rate for drug overdose was 2 percent, the brief said, citing studies.

"Other methods are not as lethal," said Jon Vernick, co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research in Baltimore.

The high court's majority opinion made no mention of suicide. But in a dissenting opinion, Justice Stephen Breyer used the word 14 times in voicing concern about the impact of striking down the handgun ban.

"If a resident has a handgun in the home that he can use for self-defense, then he has a handgun in the home that he can use to commit suicide or engage in acts of domestic violence," Breyer wrote.


Suicide is illegal.

Anyone that uses a gun to commit suiciide is breaking the law.


If we had "right to carry" laws
anyone attempting suicide with a gun, could be shot by law-abiding citizens.

Then the stats on illegal deaths by guns would go way down.
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Old 07-01-2008, 07:25 PM   #67
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Suicide is still criminalized in your states?? Seriously?

How backwards.
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Old 07-01-2008, 07:43 PM   #68
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Are you sure that's true, deep? I know there used to be a few states that criminalized suicide, but I didn't think that was still the case.
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Old 07-01-2008, 07:47 PM   #69
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From Wikipedia:

Quote:
In the United States, suicide has never been punished as a crime nor penalized by property forfeiture or ignominious burial.[citation needed] Historically, various states listed the act as a felony, but all were reluctant to enforce it. By 1963, six states still considered attempted suicide a crime (North and South Dakota, Washington, New Jersey, Nevada, and Oklahoma that repealed its law in 1976). By the early 1990s only two US states still listed suicide as a crime, and these have since removed that classification.
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Old 07-01-2008, 07:48 PM   #70
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Attempted suicide with a gun.


(because of the use of a firearm ) federal gun law enhances the penalty to capital punishment.
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Old 07-01-2008, 07:59 PM   #71
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Could you give me an example of state or statute that criminalizes attempted suicide? I'm really curious to see the statutory language as I've never seen such a provision before.
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Old 08-19-2008, 08:33 AM   #72
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Texas school district to let teachers carry guns

Fri Aug 15, 3:32 PM ET

A Texas school district will let teachers bring guns to class this fall, the district's superintendent said on Friday, in what experts said appeared to be a first in the United States.

The board of the small rural Harrold Independent School District unanimously approved the plan and parents have not objected, said the district's superintendent, David Thweatt.

School experts backed Thweatt's claim that Harrold, a system of about 110 students 150 miles northwest of Fort Worth, may be the first to let teachers bring guns to the classroom.

Thweatt said it is a matter of safety.

"We have a lock-down situation, we have cameras, but the question we had to answer is, 'What if somebody gets in? What are we going to do?" he said. "It's just common sense."

Teachers who wish to bring guns will have to be certified to carry a concealed handgun in Texas and get crisis training and permission from school officials, he said.

Recent school shootings in the United States have prompted some calls for school officials to allow students and teachers to carry legally concealed weapons into classrooms.

The U.S. Congress once barred guns at schools nationwide, but the U.S. Supreme Court struck the law down, although state and local communities could adopt their own laws. Texas bars guns at schools without the school's permission.
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Old 08-19-2008, 08:36 AM   #73
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What the fuck is wrong with my state?
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