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Old 01-24-2005, 10:10 PM   #16
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A lady at my workplace lent me B. E. Ellis' "American Psycho". I don't really know what to think of it - it's definitely one-of-a-kind book, but IMO much too repetitive and, well, rather pointless. I was -very- grateful I don't have an overly active graphic imagination, because the depictions of violence are among the most disturbing and brutal I've ever read and at one point I felt almost sick.
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Old 01-24-2005, 10:20 PM   #17
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yeah I havent been too impressed by Ellis's books. They seem to translate well into films...but I dont "get" his style of writing perhaps. American Psycho was interesting...but it really didnt do much for me. The movie took that kinda boring material and made it very interesting.
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Old 01-24-2005, 11:35 PM   #18
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I've seen the film too, but apart from Christian Bale's amazing performance I didn't think much of it; I just don't think it's a very filmable book. The funny thing is that, if you take away the book's reputation, the controversy around the film is kinda silly since IMO there's no more sex and violence in it than in your average thriller.
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Old 01-25-2005, 06:40 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by Saracene
I've seen the film too, but apart from Christian Bale's amazing performance I didn't think much of it; I just don't think it's a very filmable book. The funny thing is that, if you take away the book's reputation, the controversy around the film is kinda silly since IMO there's no more sex and violence in it than in your average thriller.
the movie is a whole different tone than the book. The book seems very serious and sure of itself (as Im sure was intention since its the main characters voice...) but the movie was mocking... I found the movie to be funny as hell. I think the book just hit at an odd time for NYC (wasnt it published not too long after the whole "Preppy Murders" bit?) and got a rep cause of that.
I didnt like Less Than Zero much either...but it was more "readable" than American Psycho
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Old 01-25-2005, 03:02 PM   #20
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Catcher in The Rye, that caused some sort of controversy here lately. I can't remember why some parents were all a twitter about it. Of course there's also the Mark Chapman thing, unless I'm mistaken about that.

That was my favorite book in high school, I think every teenager should read it.
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Old 01-25-2005, 04:24 PM   #21
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Interesting observation. I've always found so many of the Russians and other Slavic countries to generally be far ahead of their American counterparts in so many of the arts--writing, dance, male figure skating, even. There are the Russians and then almost everyone else. Cold climate, oppressive society, better love of life, who knows? I think it is because there is a celebratory amorality about their art. (I will also include some French writers here) So many Americans are afraid of passion. Even American sexuality is bland. Blatant, but bland. We don't do sensuality very well. We do not do nuance very well. We are afraid of controversy. (Obviously, I am not including all American artists here)

That being said, I don't know if all this says as much abou tAmerican artists as it does about American audiences or
readers. We don't seem to want much challenge anymore. We had great artists in the twenties, the forties, the sixties when the audiences/readers were more daring in their thinking.

I was always grateful to a friend of mine who introduced me to Russian writing (although I still hate Tolstoy) and Russian dancers and Russian male figure skaters.

Art reflects the culture, I guess. When we demand more, maybe we will get it.
I agree with this, even to the point of being a huge fan of the Russian male skaters like Yagudin and Plushchenko. They've got something we don't have.
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