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Old 06-19-2007, 07:45 PM   #16
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Originally posted by deep


And I doubt if any of the 3rd parties will nominate him.
They'd be foolish to do so...
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Old 06-19-2007, 07:50 PM   #17
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He is very Libertarian

but, currently serving as a maverick GOP congressman.

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In the 1988 presidential election, despite no previous affiliation with the Libertarian Party, Paul won the nomination of the United States Libertarian Party for the U.S. Presidency. Appearing on the ballot in 46 states and the District of Columbia,[33] he placed third in the popular vote (with 431,750 votes - 0.47%), behind George H. W. Bush and Michael Dukakis.[34] Although he had been an early supporter of Ronald Reagan, Paul was critical of the unprecedented deficits incurred by Reagan's administration, for which his opponent George H.W. Bush had been vice-president.[29]
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:03 PM   #18
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Originally posted by deep
He is very Libertarian

but, currently serving as a maverick GOP congressman.

Yeah my cousin actually ran against him for that seat. The man's been using(abusing) the Republican Party for years, that's why I have a hard time calling him a truly independent canidate...
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:08 PM   #19
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Originally posted by deep
Ron Paul, as much attention as he gets in the debates, will not come in any higher than maybe 5th in any of the GOP primaries.

And I doubt if any of the 3rd parties will nominate him.
Ron Paul will get his ideas in the media.

Accordingly, he will have performed a very important duty.

It's good to see ideas outside of the mainstream being represented in public life.
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:10 PM   #20
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Originally posted by BonoVoxSupastar
They'd be foolish to do so...
The sceptics wrote off too Perot too, but he played a very important part in that election.
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Old 06-19-2007, 10:26 PM   #21
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bloomberg isn't nader... he's a less crazy perot.

i'm psyched...

and remember... he's already got more money than all the other candidates without raising a single dollar.
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Old 06-19-2007, 10:34 PM   #22
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I really don't know much about Bloomberg or his stance on the "issues." Anybody know what he thinks about Iraq?

My hunch is that an independent candidate will ultimately hurt the Democratic field more than the Republicans.
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Old 06-19-2007, 10:42 PM   #23
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"The politics of partisanship and the resulting inaction and excuses have paralyzed decision-making, primarily at the federal level, and the big issues of the day are not being addressed, leaving our future in jeopardy,"




"I think the country is in trouble," Bloomberg said, citing the war in Iraq and America's declining standing globally.

"Our reputation has been hurt very badly in the last few years," he said. "We've had a go-it-alone mentality in a world where, because of communications and transportation, you should be going exactly in the other direction."



Strategists say he could mount a third-party campaign by stressing that he is a two-term mayor in a Democratic city and that he built his reputation as a political independent, social moderate and fiscal conservative.

Throughout his 5 1/2 years as mayor, Bloomberg has often been at odds with his party and Bush. He supports gay marriage, abortion rights, gun control and stem cell research, and raised property taxes to help solve a fiscal crisis after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
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Old 06-19-2007, 10:47 PM   #24
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not sure how this is going to play out in a general election, but it is further evidence that George Bush destroys everything he touches. he's destroyed the party of Goldwater, and even the *shudder* party of Reagan.

as for Bloomberg:

[q]U.S. Is ‘Really in Trouble,’ Says Bloomberg, Sounding Like a Candidate

By DIANE CARDWELL
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., June 18 — Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, sounding every inch the presidential candidate he insists he is not, brought his message of pragmatic, nonpartisan leadership to California on Monday, telling a crowd of Google employees that the nation was “really in trouble.”

In unusually stark terms, Mr. Bloomberg expressed his frustration with the state of the nation, touching on campaign-style issues like the war in Iraq, immigration, education, health care and crime before a crowd of more than 1,000 employees at the Google campus here.

“Whoever out of those 20 becomes president I think has to do something about a country that I think is really in trouble,” Mr. Bloomberg said, referring to the current crop of candidates. “There’s the war, there is our relationships around the world.”

“Our reputation has been hurt very badly in the last few years,” he continued, criticizing what he called a “go-it-alone mentality” in an increasingly interconnected world.


The trip west comes as speculation about Mr. Bloomberg’s presidential ambitions has intensified, with his increasing travels around the country to speak about national issues, and with aides promoting the idea behind the scenes.

Mr. Bloomberg made his comments as a guest speaker at Google, technically as part of their series of authors, ostensibly because of his autobiography, “Bloomberg by Bloomberg,” which was published in 1997. But the notion of his making a third-party run at the White House was never far from the surface.

Indeed, in introducing Mr. Bloomberg, Alan Davidson, Google’s senior policy counsel, said, to laughter, that the hourlong discussion was not part of the candidates’ series, which has already brought former Senator John Edwards, Gov. Bill Richardson and Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton and John McCain to the campus.

Asked about the subject, Mr. Bloomberg said that he was not a candidate for president and intended to finish out his term, which lasts through 2009, and then become a full-time philanthropist. Nonetheless, he declined to say definitively that he would not run, calling a question from a reporter asking him if he would rule out a candidacy too “Shermanesque” to answer.

In his remarks, he sounded much like a candidate for national office. He returned to a pet theme, criticizing the federal government for its immigration policies and what he sees as insufficient attention to rising costs of Social Security and health care.

Mr. Bloomberg also took a swipe at the presidential candidates of both parties, saying they were not offering serious ideas about improving public education or lowering street crime.

Arguing that people have a much greater chance of being killed by street crime than by a terror attack, he said: “Yet every press conference, they all beat their chests and say, ‘I can protect this country better from terrorism.’ Well, what about protecting them out in the streets every day?”

Mr. Bloomberg began his day in San Francisco. urging members of the Commonwealth Club, a public affairs group, to exert pressure on Congress to drop an amendment from its spending bill this year that limits the way the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives releases information about the source of illegal guns.

He ended the day in Los Angeles, where he assailed what he called the “swamp of dysfunction” in Washington. His remarks came in a speech opening a two-day conference for which Mr. Bloomberg is a co-host with the mayor of Los Angeles, Antonio Villaraigosa.

[/q]
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Old 06-20-2007, 02:13 AM   #25
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Poor Could Draw $6,000 a Year Under Bloomberg Plan

BY ELIZABETH GREEN - Staff Reporter of the Sun
June 19, 2007

Getting a library card, going to the dentist, and keeping a job will soon yield up to $6,000 a year in bonus cash under a test program that New York City is trying as part of Mayor Bloomberg's anti-poverty initiative.

About 13,000 families will be eligible for the payments, part of a $50 million program whose details were announced yesterday by the deputy mayor for health and human services, Linda Gibbs.

The idea is to offer payments to encourage behaviors that have been shown to reduce poverty. A library card for an elementary or middle school student will bring his parents $50; a preventive dental visit brings $100 for each family member; and a steady full-time job pays $150 extra a month.

Conditional cash transfers have become a popular anti-poverty experiment in the developing world, but New York City's will be the first American attempt.

The vice president of the Center for Global Development, Ruth Levine, praised Mr. Bloomberg for taking that step. "It's exciting to see that the mayor has decided to look at the evidence," she said, calling similar projects some of the world's most research-proven social programs.

Much of the money is tied to educational goals, such as attending a parent-teacher conference ($25 per conference, maximum two conferences a year), downloading your child's test results ($25 per download, maximum five downloads a year), and getting a child to attend school 95% of the time ($25 a month for parents, and an extra $25 for high schoolers).

One prong of the experiment — actually three separate projects that will have three sets of participants — will pay fourth- and seventh-graders incremental gifts based on how well they do on math and reading tests. Another prong, which targets low-income families and is the only to promise a maximum $6,000 in rewards, will pay high school students for things like taking a college entrance exam, the PSAT ($50), and graduating ($400).

Ms. Gibbs said the focus has to do with education's proven track record. "You cut your poverty rate in half if you can get that college degree," she said.

Funded by private donations, the Opportunity NYC program is now set to last just two years. But Ms. Gibbs made it clear that Mr. Bloomberg has broader ambitions. "At this point in two years we'll be looking to see if there is enough promise in this approach that we would be willing to commit city money to it," she said.

The Rockefeller Foundation, George Soros's Open Society Institute, and Mayor Bloomberg are among the private financiers.

Whether an expanded project could garner political support is unclear.

A policy analyst at the New America Foundation, Rourke O'Brien, said the proposal's unique blend of direct cash transfers and a commitment to personal responsibility could be broadly appealing, but some policy experts were skeptical.

A fellow at the right-leaning Manhattan Institute, Heather Mac Donald, scoffed at what she described as another extension of the welfare state. "When does this program ever stop?" she asked. "When do you stop paying people?"

Meanwhile, a senior economist at the left-leaning Fiscal Policy Institute, Trudi Renwick, questioned whether $6,000 would be enough to make a difference to a family. "If people are struggling to survive," she said, "they can't go to parent-teacher meetings."

Half the program's participants will be a control group, receiving no cash incentives — a design that will aid researchers charged with determining the program's effects.

Their research will be ongoing, as the mayor's staff hopes to build a case for expanding parts of the program, should they work.

No participants have yet been chosen. Ms. Gibbs said recruitment will begin this summer.

Tell me how this guy would take any votes away from the GOP candidate?
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Old 06-20-2007, 08:12 AM   #26
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Tell me how this guy would take any votes away from the GOP candidate?
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Old 06-20-2007, 01:18 PM   #27
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Tell me how this guy would take any votes away from the GOP candidate?
bloomberg has a chance to inspire the middle in the same way that ross perot did, only without the built in crazyness of ole' big ears.

perot got 19% of the popular vote in 1992 against an incumbent and an electric personality/politician... 16 years on, bloomberg will/could run at a time when many more americans are disenfranchised with both parties than they were in '92, with no clear candidate stepping to the forefront.

he might not win... but it certainly would be interesting.


the thing i absolutely love about mike bloomberg, the way he's run new york city thus far, is that he can't be bought out... who's gonna buy out a billionaire? bill gates? the guy's got all the money in the world, he could care less about special interest groups, he simply makes decisions based on what he feels is best. he's done things that lean right, he's done things that lean left. he's done things that have hurt the tobacco companies, the fast food industry, the oil companies. he doesn't give a crap.
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Old 06-20-2007, 01:29 PM   #28
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http://wcbstv.com/topstories/local_story_170181024.html

On Wednesday, Bloomberg echoed what he stated Tuesday about keeping his job as mayor. "My intentions are to be mayor for the next 925 days," he said during a noon news conference.

He did, however, go off on long tangents about his opinions on political policies after saying he did believe that there needs to be more candidates running for president. "I do think the more people that run for office the better. Hopefully this country is smart enough to pick someone to lead this country fully. Nobody is going to have an easy time," he said.
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Old 06-20-2007, 09:34 PM   #29
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Let's say he does run...and Hillary wins the Democratic candidacy, and Giuliani the Republican (unlikely in my book, but just for arguments sake)

That means all the candidates will be from New York. I wonder how the rest of the country will feel about that.

Methinks that will allow room for a fourth candidate, a more conservative one to come in. Could that one win? Having three liberal candidates may make more conservative voters run after that fourth person.
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Old 06-21-2007, 12:35 AM   #30
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I think we have more than enough candidates right now (Two-thirds of which have absolutely zero chance). However, I dont think Bloomberg entering the race would be entirely bad. He might have the same effect as Nader did. He is anti-war, so he would split the anti-war vote with Hillary, hopefully propelling the Republican nominee to victory.
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