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Old 06-09-2006, 08:56 PM   #1
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Aung San Suu Kyi Hospitalized

This is VERY troubling news:


US worried over Suu Kyi medical reports Fri Jun 9, 2:53 PM ET


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States voiced concern on Friday over reports Myanmar democracy campaigner Aung San Suu Kyi may have been hospitalized and urged the authorities to release the Nobel laureate from house arrest.


State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said he had heard reports that Suu Kyi had been hospitalized but he could not confirm whether they were true or not.


"We would call upon the Burmese (Myanmar) government to provide Aung San Suu Kyi any and all medical assistance that she might need and to do so expeditiously and to ensure her safety during any treatment," said McCormack.


"We are, of course, very concerned by these reports and we would also reiterate our call on the regime to release her from house arrest," he added.


Earlier on Friday, military-ruled Myanmar, formerly called Burma, confirmed Suu Kyi's house arrest had been extended for one year.


Suu Kyi won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991 and has been in prison or under house arrest off and on since 1989. Her party, the National League for Democracy, won landslide elections in 1990 but the military refused to relinquish power.



http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060609/...kyi_medical_dc
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And here is an email that I received from the U.S. Campaign for Burma organization today:


We have learned that Aung San Suu Kyi has been hospitalized in Rangoon.


While news reports (see AP article below) cite severe diarrhea, we have
reason to fear that her situation is worse than that would make it
sound
- severe gastro-intestinal distress like Aung San Suu Kyi is
experiencing can be signs of serious medical conditions and she has not
been able to see her doctor regularly in the recent months because of
increased restrictions imposed by the regime.



The international media is aware that this is happening, though we
cannot rely on them to report it widely enough. As a measure to
protect
Aung San Suu Kyi's safety while she's in the hospital we must make June
17 a huge day of action. We can protect her by insisting on vigilant
and intense international scrutiny by the media and the world's
governments.


Please, please double your efforts now.


Contact the local media about your house party, invite more people,
solicit more funds, donate more, and get more letters written so that
Aung San Suu Kyi will be provided with the best medical care, and so
that she will be released, and we can begin on a path to global action
that might end all of this suffering once and for all.

The last time that Aung San Suu Kyi was free (in 2003), the military
tried to assassinate her. She needs our help and protection, and even
if you don't feel like your one house party in middle-America will make
the difference, yours and the 252+ others combined WILL make a
difference, like so many individual drops of water building a great
ocean.


Let's all do our part and more.

Cristina




Myanmar's Suu Kyi Hospitalized

By NICK WADHAMS

The Associated Press

Friday, June 9, 2006; 3:10 PM

UNITED NATIONS -- Myanmar's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has
been hospitalized with severe diarrhea, activists with contacts in the
country said Friday.

Suu Kyi, 60, was taken to the hospital Thursday afternoon after calling
her physician to say she was suffering from diarrhea and weakness, said
Thaung Htun, the New York-based U.N. representative for the Burmese
government in exile. Myanmar is also known as Burma.

Htun said Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize winner who has spent much of the
last 16 years under house arrest, was delayed going to the hospital
because her physician had trouble getting permission to see her.

"The physician should have a visit any time he thinks it's necessary,"
Htun said. "Delays should not happen because of asking permission from
the authorities."

Htun said colleagues in Myanmar had confirmed Suu Kyi's
hospitalization.
It was not immediately clear if she had been released.

In Washington, the State Department said it had heard reports of Suu
Kyi's hospitalization but could not confirm them.

"We would call upon the Burmese government to provide Aung San Suu Kyi
any and all medical assistance that she might need and to do so
expeditiously and to ensure her safety during any treatment," spokesman
Sean McCormack said.

"And we would also reiterate our call on the regime to release her from
house arrest. It's sometimes difficult to get good, solid information
in
Burma, just because of the nature of the place. But we are quite
concerned about the reports."

Myanmar's junta took power in 1988 after crushing vast pro-democracy
demonstrations in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. In 1990, it refused
to hand over power when Suu Kyi's party won a general election by a
landslide.

The United States and many Western nations have since shunned the junta
due to its poor human rights record and failure to give up power.

Earlier Friday, the government acknowledged for the first time that it
had extended her house arrest last month.

-------------------------------------------------------------------


PLEASE visit this website to learn what more that you can do to support freedom and democracy in Burma and to win the

UNCONDITIONAL RELEASE OF AUNG SAN SUU KYI!


Thank you for your time.


http://www.uscampaignforburma.org
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Old 06-09-2006, 09:52 PM   #2
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Thanks for the notice.
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Old 06-09-2006, 10:29 PM   #3
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You're very welcomed, U2democrat.

I only hope more people will become interested in this very disconcerting situation for one of the GREAT leaders of our time.

WALK ON....
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Old 06-10-2006, 10:08 PM   #4
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To show your support of freedom and democracy in Burma and for the IMMEDIATE and UNCONDITIONAL RELEASE of Aung San Suu Kyi, the U.S. Campaign for Burma is asking as many people as possible to "arrest yourselves" on June 17, 2006 in honor of the 61st birthday of "The Lady".


Here is some more info on this international event:


'Arrest Yourself' on June 17, 2006!


Help the world's most prominent political prisoner, Aung San Suu Kyi !



We are calling on every single person in the world who cares about human rights to lock themselves up in their home for 24 hours in solidarity with Aung San Suu Kyi on June 17, 2006 - the weekend before her 61st birthday.


Why 'Arrest Yourself?'
Aung San Suu Kyi (pronounced Sue Chee) has been held in prison and under house arrest for over ten of the past 16 years in the Southeast Asian country of Burma, which is situated between China and India.

Her captor--Burma's ruling dictator Than Shwe--is among the world's most brutal leaders and is often compared to Kim Jong Il of North Korea.


How Do I Participate?
First, sign up to 'arrest yourself' on June 17, 2006.

If you live in the United States, we'll send you a packet of materials so that you can hold a successful and action-oriented 'Arrest Yourself' party through the mail. You can also download these materials by clicking on the individual packet items below. We'll sign you up to our listserve for 'arrest yourself' party hosts so you can share your party ideas and ask any questions you may have.

Next, start inviting your 'arrest yourself' house party guests, and making your party preparations! With June 17 fast approaching, you should be making plans ASAP.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Hope that YOU will arrest yourself next weekend to show your support for a free and democratic Burma

and the immediate and unconditional release of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.


WALK ON....
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Old 06-12-2006, 12:16 AM   #5
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What a difference a day makes (and a whole lot of international pressure)!

The day after it was reported that Aung San Suu Kyi was hospitalized with severe gastro-intestinal problems, she evidently was treated and released to return back to her home to resume her illegal house detention:


http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060611...i_060611073645



Aung San Suu Kyi feeling better after illness: party

Sun Jun 11, 4:31 PM ET



YANGON (AFP) - Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi is feeling better after suffering from stomach troubles and remained at home under the care of her personal physician, her party said.

Her family doctor is taking very good care of her. We are sure of that," said Nyan Win, a spokesman for her National League for Democracy. "The latest information we have is that by yesterday, she was recovering."

Reports of her illness had on Friday prompted the US State Department to say it was "very concerned" and call on the country's military rulers to ensure she received prompt treatment.

Nyan Win on Saturday said that the 60-year-old Nobel peace laureate had been briefly hospitalized on Friday for treatment.

But on Sunday he said "it was a misunderstanding," and that the party was still trying to confirm whether she had been taken to hospital.

Myanmar's police chief, Major General Khin Yi, said that the doctor had treated her at home Thursday for digestive problems and that she had not left the house.

Aung San Suu Kyi's doctor could not be reached for comment on her condition, but Nyan Win said the physician could still be caring for her inside the lakeside home where she is under house arrest.

The daughter of the country's independence hero Aung San has spent more than 10 of the past 17 years under house arrest, with only a short-wave radio to connect her to the outside world.

The junta last month defied international demands for her freedom and extended her house arrest by another year.

Aung San Suu Kyi has been held in detention since a May 2003 attack on her convoy by junta-backed militia in the country's central region.

She was thrown into prison after the assault but, following a gynecological operation four months later, allowed to return home -- again under house arrest.

Just last month, more than two years after being barred from seeing foreigners, Aung San Suu Kyi was allowed by the junta to meet with UN Under Secretary General Ibrahim Gambari.

The UN envoy said after the surprise meeting that Aung San Suu Kyi's health was good, but reported that she would like visits by her doctors "to be more predictable and regular".

Hopes had swelled for her release after the meeting, but the junta -- accused by various governments and non-governmental groups of human rights abuses -- extended her house arrest.

UN Secretary General Kofi Annan was among world leaders who expressed profound disappointment over the junta's decision.

Her National League for Democracy party won a landslide election victory in 1990, but the military government never recognized the result.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is definitely a situation that all supporters of human rights and democracy need to keep a watch on.
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Old 06-12-2006, 08:21 PM   #6
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Here is a short biography about "The Lady" from the website that bears her name:


Aung San Suu Kyi is the daughter of one of Burma's most cherished heroes, the martyred General Aung San, who led his country's fight for independence from Great Britain in the 1940s and was killed for his beliefs in 1947. Suu Kyi has equaled her father's heroics with her calm but passionate advocacy of freedom and democracy in the country now called Myanmar, a name chosen by one of the most insensitive and brutal military dictatorships in the world.

The ruling junta – "political party" would be too generous a concession – goes by the Orwellian name of the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC). Burma, or Myanmar, has a population of 45 million and is Southeast Asia's second largest country (in area) after Indonesia.

The news event that brought Suu Kyi back into prominence in May 2002 was her release from 19 months of house arrest in her barricaded villa in Yangon, formerly Rangoon. The United Nations helped to negotiate her release this time.

There was outrage around the world in 2000 when Suu Kyi tried to leave Yangon, only to be thwarted by authorities. In August of that year Suu Kyi, her driver and 14 members of her pro-democracy party were confined in two cars on the side of the road outside of Yangon. She endured a similar roadside standoff for 13 days in 1998, during which time she suffered severe dehydration and had to be returned to her home by ambulance.

Suu Kyi (pronounced Soo Chee) was two years old when her father – the de facto prime minister of newly independent Burma – was assassinated. Though a Buddhist – the predominant religion of Burma – she was educated at Catholic schools and left for India in her mid-teens with her mother, who became the Burmese ambassador to India. Suu Kyi went to England where she studied at Oxford University. There she met Michael Aris, the Tibetan scholar whom she married. They had two sons, Alexander and Kim.

A watershed in her life was 1988, when Suu Kyi received a call from Burma that her mother had suffered a stroke and did not have long to live. Suu Kyi returned to Burma, leaving her husband and two children behind in England, having cautioned them years earlier that duty may one day call her back to her homeland.

She arrived back in Burma to nurse her mother at a time of a burgeoning pro-democracy movement, fueled by the energy and idealism among the country's young people. There were demonstrations against the repressive, one-party socialist government. Suu Kyi was drawn into the pro-democracy movement, which was snuffed out by SLORC, which seized power on September 18, 1988. Thousands of pro-democracy advocates were killed.

Next came a general election in 1990, which political parties were allowed to contest. Suu Kyi headed the National League for Democracy (NLD), which won a landslide victory, with 80 per cent support. This was not be tolerated by the SLORC leaders, who refused to recognize the election results. Worse, SLORC put the elected pro-democracy leaders under house arrest, including Suu Kyi.

Despite the restrictions of house arrest, Suu Kyi continued to campaign for democracy, and for this she won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991.

One of Suu Kyi's most dramatic speeches was in 1995, soon after she was released from nearly six years of house arrest, when she spoke to a global women's conference in Beijing. She didn't appear at the conference, but spoke to the international gathering by means of a video smuggled out of Burma. Suu Kyi always expresses herself with calm conviction and calm passion, which reflects her Buddhist upbringing. She is Gandhian in her synergistic mixture of force and restraint.

In her speech, she said, "…to the best of my knowledge, no war was ever started by women. But it is women and children who have always suffered the most in situations of conflict." She mentioned "the war toys of grown men." Without specifically targeting her SLORC opponents, but her words dripping with gentle sarcasm, Suu Kyi went on to say:

"There is an outmoded Burmese proverb still recited by men, who wish to deny that women too can play a part in bringing necessary change and progress to their society: 'The dawn rises only when the rooster crows.' But Burmese people today are well aware of the scientific reason behind the rising of dawn and the falling of dusk. And the intelligent rooster surely realizes that it is because dawn comes that it crows and not the other way around.

"It crows to welcome the light that has come to relieve the darkness of night. It is not the prerogative of men alone to bring light to the world: women with their capacity for compassion and self-sacrifice, their courage and perseverance, have done much to dissipate the darkness of intolerance and hate, suffering and despair."

It was a powerful speech, subtly crafted for the targeted audience in her homeland.

In 1999, Michael Aris, was dying of prostate cancer in England, where he lived with their two sons. He had repeatedly requested permission to visit his wife one last time before he died, but the SLORC authorities denied him entry, arguing that there are no proper facilities in the country to tend to a dying man. They suggested instead that Suu Kyi visit him in England. She refused, fearing if she ever left the country she would never be allowed to return.

The day Aris died, on his 53rd birthday on March 27, 1999, Suu Kyi honoured the occasion at her home in Rangoon, with 1,000 friends and supporters, including high-ranking diplomats from Europe and the United States. As part of a ceremony, she offered food and saffron robes to 53 Buddhist monks, one for each year of her husband's life. The monks recited prayers and chanted sutras. Instead of wearing her usual bright flowers and wreathes of jasmine, Suu Kyi chose instead a traditional black lungi with a white jacket. She cried only when one of the monks reminded the audience that the essence of Buddhism is to treat suffering with equanimity.

The police did not stop the supporters from visiting Suu Kyi in her time of grief. But they took the names and addresses of all those who attended at the service to honour the husband from whom she had been separated since she left England to tend to her dying mother.


-----------------------------------------------------


I hope that this article informs more people about Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.


She has had a much more diverse life and experiences in her life than I think some people realize.


Next time, I'll provide ONE way that you can show your support FOR THE LADY.


http://www.dassk.org/contents.php?id=127



WALK ON....
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Old 06-13-2006, 07:09 AM   #7
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http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayA...editorial&col=

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pressure is building on the illegal military government in Burma to release Aung San Suu Kyi from detention and to restore democracy to Burma!


Here is an editorial from a newspaper in India which appeared yesterday:




Set Suu Kyi free

12 June 2006



US has strongly reacted to reports about the illness of Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s charismatic champion of democracy, demanding her immediate release. Suu Kyi, who has remained a prisoner in her own home, after her National League for Democracy swept parliamentary elections in 1990.


The military junta that has ruled the Southeast Asian country for the past 45 years simply ignored the democratic verdict. Instead it went ahead and imprisoned Suu Kyi, the winner of that historic vote. Last month, the Generals extended her detention by another year despite passionate appeals by Myanmar’s friends, neighbours and the world powers.

Myanmar remains an affront to the international community and all that it believes in: freedom, democracy, rule of law, justice and human rights. It is hard to believe that the tyrants can get away with such blatant abuse of basic rights in the 21st century. When will the world act to stop this continuing outrage? The Generals in Yangon have to be sent back to their barracks, or wherever they came from.

Myanmar’s neighbours and big powers have to stop treating the junta with kid gloves. It’s time to show where the world stands on basics such as a people’s right to determine and run own affairs. And it’s time to force the junta to free Suu Kyi and her people.
---------------------------------------------------------

This is EXCELLENT news!

The more the countries in the area put pressure on the military government, the better the chances that things will change sooner than later.



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Old 06-13-2006, 08:28 AM   #8
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7amila, it's an editorial...
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Old 06-13-2006, 11:34 AM   #9
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Thanks for the info.

As for the last article, yeah, as an editorial I would HOPE that those things would happen, but unfortunately it's not news until people follow through.
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Old 06-13-2006, 08:49 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by Zoomerang96
7amila, it's an editorial...
I'm fully aware that it's an editorial.

My point which was clearly delineated is that when the countries in the area of Burma begin to state as clearly as this editorial does that they also want to see change in Burma, then that's a very positive thing.

How could anyone interpret it as anything but a positive development?

For too long countries in SE Asia have looked the other way to the abuses of the illegal military government that has ruled Burma.

Now more and more of them are speaking out against the military dictatorship in Burma.

Again, how could you interpret it as anything but a positive development?


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Old 06-14-2006, 06:28 AM   #11
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Here is ONE thing that you can do this weekend to help show your support for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi:

you can "ARREST YOURSELF" to help gain her freedom!


Check it out:



'Arrest Yourself' on June 17, 2006!

Help the world's most prominent political prisoner, Aung San Suu Kyi


We are calling on every single person in the world who cares about human rights to lock themselves up in their home for 24 hours in solidarity with Aung San Suu Kyi on June 17, 2006 - the weekend before her 61st birthday.



Why 'Arrest Yourself?'

Aung San Suu Kyi (pronounced Sue Chee) has been held in prison and under house arrest for over ten of the past 16 years in the Southeast Asian country of Burma, which is situated between China and India.

Her captor--Burma's ruling dictator Than Shwe--is among the world's most brutal leaders and is often compared to Kim Jong Il of North Korea.



How Do I Participate?

First, sign up to 'arrest yourself' on June 17, 2006.

If you live in the United States, we'll send you a packet of materials so that you can hold a successful and action-oriented 'Arrest Yourself' party through the mail. You can also download these materials by clicking on the individual packet items below. We'll sign you up to our listserve for 'arrest yourself' party hosts so you can share your party ideas and ask any questions you may have.

Next, start inviting your 'arrest yourself' house party guests, and making your party preparations! With June 17 fast approaching, you should be making plans ASAP.



Lastly, start thinking about your "Beaming Burma!" project. "Beaming Burma!" is a cutting-edge and unique video project that will allow people all over the world to create video-taped messages of support and hope to the people of Burma, who will actually watch the videos on satellite TV inside Burma!



http://www.uscampaignforburma.org/action/community.html



I will be arresting myself this weekend.


Here is a list of everyone around the USA and elsewhere who will also be "arresting themselves" and their friends who participate in this event to show our Respect for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and the very beleaguered People of Burma.



http://www.uscampaignforburma.org/action/j17.html



Please join us.
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Old 06-15-2006, 11:32 PM   #12
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Here is some VERY INTERESTING news today about the conti- nuing international pressure to free Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest:


Aung San Suu Kyi Relative Files First Petition to UN Rights Body
June 16, 2006

By Agence France-Presse

WASHINGTON -- A family member of Myanmar's jailed pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Thursday filed the first petition with a new UN Human Rights Council challenging her detention by the country's military junta.


The petition was filed just as the Geneva-based council officially took over at 2200 GMT Thursday from the discredited UN Commission on Human Rights, which has been abolished by the world body as part of UN reforms.


It was filed on the relative's behalf by American lawyer Jared Genser, who is also president of Freedom Now, a US-based group striving to free "prisoners of conscience" across the globe.


Freedom Now filed the petition directly to the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, a five-member panel of human rights experts led by Algerian judge Leila Zerrougui which will operate under the council.


"I think it is highly appropriate that this first case filed to this new human rights council is on behalf of such an important symbol of freedom, democracy and human rights in the world," Genser told AFP.


He declined to name the member of the detained leader's family who authorized him to file the petition, saying he had to "maintain their privacy."



Aung San Suu Kyi is the world’s only imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and has spent more than 10 of the last 17 years under house arrest.


Defying international demands for her freedom, Myanmar's military rulers in late May extended her arrest for another year.


Previously, the UN working group had declared that her house arrest was in violation of international law.


"This new petition to the working group is necessary because the latest working group's declaration in 2004 expired when the military junta in Burma (Myanmar) issued a new detention order on May 27, 2006," Genser said.



"We need to reaffirm that her extended house arrest is a violation of international law," he explained.


The petition came in the wake of a US bid to seek a UN Security Council resolution compelling Myanmar's military junta to change its repressive policies.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

All I can add to this action is....WALK ON!
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Old 06-16-2006, 10:28 PM   #13
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Here is a very good editorial about "The Lady" on the eve of the worldwide "arrest parties" that will be happening around the world to remember Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.



http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...mment-opinions



Asia's captive heroine
Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi will turn 61 in forced solitude.

By Timothy Garton Ash

TIMOTHY GARTON ASH is professor of European studies at Oxford University and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

June 15, 2006




NEXT MONDAY is the 61st birthday of Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese opposition leader and Nobel Prize winner. Unless she is back in the hospital, where she was recently treated for a stomach ailment, she will presumably mark that birthday alone in the rundown villa on the shore of Inya Lake where she has spent more than 10 of the last 17 years under house arrest.



We don't know what she will do, what she is writing or what she is thinking. Her isolation is almost total. According to recent reports, she sees only a housekeeper, the housekeeper's daughter, a gardener and occasionally her doctor. It seems unlikely she will even be able to talk on the phone with sons Alexander and Kim, who live in the West.


We are told she spends time meditating, playing piano and keeping fit, but that is hearsay. The last foreigner to meet her was a United Nations envoy, Ibrahim Gambari, who visited Burma — now officially Myanmar — last month and said she was well. There were rumors at the time that her house arrest would be lifted, but a few days later, the military regime extended her detention for another year. So much for dialogue.


I will never forget meeting Suu Kyi in Rangoon — now Yangon — about six years ago, when she was still able to leave her house. I delivered a lecture about transitions to democracy — which she interpreted — to a brave group of activists of the National League for Democracy, or NLD. Such a meeting would be unthinkable today in a country that has gone backward while all around are going forward.


I'm sure she will be bearing her solitary confinement with fortitude, grace and the Buddhist life-philosophy that is so important to her. Yet I feel a terrible sense of frustration in writing about her and her country's predicament. What new is there to say? That she is a heroine of our time, an Asian Nelson Mandela? That the Burmese generals run one of the worst states in the world, spending about 40% of the country's budget on the military while most of their people live in poverty and disease? (The health system is ranked 190th out of 190 countries by the World Health Organization.) That dialogue with the NLD, which overwhelmingly won a democratic election in 1990, is the key to political change? All true. All said a thousand times already. All to no apparent effect.


But if she doesn't give up, we have no right to. So here are three modest thoughts about possible ways to thaw this frozen conflict.


First of all, remembering Burma is itself a political act of the first importance. As the Czech writer Milan Kundera famously observed, "The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting." Forgetting Burma is just what its rulers want us to do. We have to keep hammering away. After all, though the comparison is hardly encouraging, Nelson Mandela was in prison for 27 years, and yet South Africa moved in the end.

Second, while paying all respect to Suu Kyi's often-repeated call for tight sanctions against the military regime, we should think again about the mix of our policies. For example, is there more we can do to alleviate directly the suffering of the population from the effects of AIDS or heroin addiction without giving an unacceptable payoff to the regime? What mixture of carrots and sticks would have a chance of persuading the Burmese military to loosen up?



Third, if the internal key to change is the reopening of dialogue between the regime and the NLD, the external key is a change in approach by at least one of the country's Asian neighbors — because we in the West simply don't have enough leverage to do it ourselves.

Where to begin? Surely in India, the world's largest democracy and the country where Suu Kyi went to school. One hardly expects communist China to press for liberalization and democracy in its disgraceful little neighbor, but it is disappointing that democratic India has been so timid toward its Burmese neighbor. The shape of the conversation should not be (Washington speaking), "Hey, Indians, you must take our self-evidently correct Western template and help us impose it on Burma." It should be: "We're wondering whether you think, judging by your own values, that this is acceptable behavior in your own immediate neighborhood?"



This is the shape of the new world order, if there is to be one. If we are to achieve liberal ends in an increasingly multipolar world, then we do have to rethink how we say it, and to whom. And we have to listen more than we have for the last 500 years.


------------------------------------------------------------

I especially liked the idea that if she doesn't give up, then neither should we.


EXCELLENT!


I hope that you will do something special to remember "The Lady" this weekend and beyond this weekend because Aung San Suu Kyi's struggle is much bigger than her own freedom.


It's about the freedom of the Burmese people.


Thanks for your time.


http://www.freeburmacoalition.org
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Old 06-16-2006, 10:36 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jamila

'Arrest Yourself' on June 17, 2006!
Don't forget to arrest yourself tomorrow Jamilla!
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Old 06-17-2006, 06:53 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by zoney!


Don't forget to arrest yourself tomorrow Jamilla!
I have a feeling that this comment wasn't sincerely meant to show support for Aung San Suu Kyi as to take another cheap dig at me.

If that is the case, it's really sad to know that some people at this site refuse to move on with their lives enough to stop appearing to be so immature as to try to make fun of me at Daw Aung San Suu Kyi's expense.


That would say a whole lot more about them than about me.

I will be glad to "arrest myself" tomorrow for "The Lady" as will thousands of other people around the world this weekend.


And I will our efforts on her behalf.
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