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Old 06-08-2003, 01:44 PM   #16
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As of Friday I haven't received any newsletters from the Free Burma Coalition, becoming more concerned by the moment.
By the way, if you are interested in receiving newsletter's or help in any other way, go to their site and sign up:
http://www.freeburmacoalition.org

Thanks FrizzingWhizzbees for the link to AI. Good specific information there on How to write and word a letter to a (un-reconized) government or the officials - such as the ones in Myanmar or as we know it should be - Burma.
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Old 06-08-2003, 05:12 PM   #17
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http://web.amnesty.org/pages/mmr-040603-action-eng

Here's the Amnesty link guys.

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Old 06-10-2003, 12:53 AM   #18
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Is anyone else concerned why Amnesty or Free Burma is not sending emails?

I hate to say this, but the first thing that comes to my mind, is that her life is or was in jeopardy if no one is saying anything.

*sick to stomach*
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Old 06-10-2003, 12:43 PM   #19
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This is good news, I hope.. I still haven't received any additional newsletters from Free Burma but I Found this article today in the Washington Post. I heard John McCain talking about it while getting ready for work this morning. Glad someone in government is trying to get the word out.

U.N. Diplomat Meets Detained Burmese Activist
Suu Kyi in 'Good Spirits' and Uninjured
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BANGKOK, June 10-Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese opposition leader held incommunicado for 11 days after a violent clash between her supporters and government-backed activists, is uninjured, "in good spirits and very feisty," U.N. special envoy Razali Ismail said after a brief visit with her today.

Read the whole article here:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...ml?nav=hptoc_w
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Old 06-11-2003, 12:07 PM   #20
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Razali sees Aung San Suu Kyi yesterday. This according to LA Times today. Here's the article:


June 11, 2003 E-mail story Print


EDITORIAL
Freeze Myanmar Assets

The military thugs running Myanmar finally may have opened their eyes to the esteem in which Aung San Suu Kyi is held outside their nation. They already knew how much their oppressed citizens thought of the woman who should be leading the nation formerly known as Burma: The huge numbers greeting her on her journeys around her country provided graphic evidence of her popularity.

Harboring despots' fears of ouster by a charismatic pro-democracy leader, the army rulers arrested Suu Kyi, again, after a deadly attack on her motorcade May 30. However, they let United Nations representative Razali Ismail meet with the democracy activist Tuesday after stalling for days.

Delay is not new for Razali, who has sought for two years to push the nation's autocrats toward democracy. He deserves credit for insisting on a meeting with Suu Kyi; so does his boss, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who denounces the generals.

In 1947 a political rival assassinated Suu Kyi's father, an architect of the independence movement. Forty years later, his daughter began campaigning against the military regimes that ruled the country for much of its post-independence history. In 1990, she and her party won a parliamentary election but the military scrapped those results and kept her under house arrest. It also refused to let her leave to receive her 1991 Nobel Peace Prize or to be with her husband as he lay dying in England.

But a year ago, the junta let Suu Kyi travel again. Seeing her popularity undimmed, the government organized the May30 ambush of her motorcade and cited the violence as cause for her arrest. She was held incommunicado until Razali met her. Nearby nations like Thailand and Malaysia feebly protested the assault and arrest.

The U.S. Congress is considering tougher measures to freeze the assets of the Myanmar government held in the United States and to bar the country's leaders from traveling here.

Those steps are warranted unless Suu Kyi is released and allowed to travel freely. The United States and other countries earlier imposed economic sanctions on Myanmar that devastated its economy. Trade with Thailand and China, plus the export of narcotics, has kept it afloat.

The trading partners, other countries in the region and aid givers like Japan need to get tougher by imposing sanctions and aid suspensions to push the country toward democracy; that's the outcome Myanmar's citizens show they favor every time they get the chance.
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Old 06-13-2003, 09:12 PM   #21
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Myanmar's Suu Kyi May Be Released This Month-Report

_____Democracy in Burma_____


I truly hope this is so. Two articles here. It's long but alot is happening in Suu Kyi's life:

Reuters
Friday, June 13, 2003; 9:06 AM
TOKYO (Reuters) - Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been detained by the ruling military for the past two weeks, may be released later this month, an official in Myanmar's Foreign Ministry told Japanese media on Friday.

Thaung Tun, director general of the ministry's political department, was quoted by Kyodo news agency as saying that Suu Kyi could be released if the situation in Myanmar "returns to normal."
No further details were available from the interview, which was conducted in Phnom Penh ahead of a series of meetings of Asia-Pacific nations.
Myanmar's military government took Suu Kyi into what it called "protective" custody during a trip to the north on May 30 after a clash between her supporters and government forces.

Suu Kyi and about two dozen senior members of her National League for Democracy have been held at locations in or outside the Myanmar capital, sources told Reuters in Yangon. Some of the locations are undisclosed.
The government said on Tuesday they would release her as soon as possible, but gave no time frame. She has spent more than half of the last 14 years in detention at her Yangon home.

Secretary of State Colin Powell said on Thursday he would seek action from Asian countries on the issue during a trip to the region next week for an annual meeting of the Association of South East Asian Nations Regional Forum.


U.S. Sanctions Bill Would Ban Burmese Imports
Friday, June 13, 2003;

Outraged over the latest crackdown by Burma's military junta, Congress is poised to approve legislation that would impose some of the toughest economic sanctions ever on a country for human rights violations, including a ban on the importation of Burmese goods.

The Senate passed a sanctions bill by a 97 to 1 vote on Wednesday, amid indignation over a deadly May 30 attack on the motorcade of Aung San Suu Kyi, leader of Burma's pro-democracy forces, who was later detained. Yesterday, the House International Relations Committee approved a similar bill by voice vote, and Secretary of State Colin L. Powell endorsed the "goals and intent" of the bills in a signed Wall Street Journal commentary headlined "It's Time to Turn the Tables on Burma's Thugs."

Business groups are protesting that the sanctions violate international trade rules, will accomplish little in the absence of cooperation from other countries, and contravene the longstanding U.S. policy of using "engagement," including commerce, to change the behavior of dictatorial regimes. But "when the train is moving 400 miles per hour, not a whole lot of people want to stand on the tracks," said William A. Reinsch, president of the National Foreign Trade Council, a corporate-backed organization.

The proposed import ban, which would cut off shipments of textiles and other Burmese goods to the United States that totaled about $356 million last year, gives the legislation far more of an economic bite than most other human rights or pro-democracy bills that Congress has passed. The only comparable laws to be enacted in recent memory, according to Kimberly Ann Elliott, a expert on sanctions at the Institute for International Economics, are the embargo on Cuba, the sanctions that restricted commerce with South Africa's apartheid regime and similar bans on trade with Haiti in the early 1990s.

The success enjoyed by Burma's congressional critics, whose leaders include Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Rep. Tom Lantos (D-Calif.), marks a reversal of a trend away from the use of trade as a weapon for human rights and other foreign policy purposes. The predominance of the engagement approach was evident in the approval of "permanent normal trade relations" with China in 2000, and Powell derided sanctions as exercises in futility when the Bush administration took office.

So although commerce with poverty-stricken Burma is of scant economic significance to the United States, business representatives fear that a trade embargo on Rangoon will give human rights activists and other proponents of sanctions new momentum to press for trade restrictions on other countries. After all, if engagement has been judged a clear failure in Burma's case, that makes it harder to argue that the policy will work at loosening authoritarian control elsewhere.

"We were kind of on a roll," Reinsch said ruefully. "Someone asked me the other day for a list of sanctions that had been enacted since [the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks], and the answer is none. I thought that was a pretty good record. Then here we go." Besides the Burma legislation, "there are other bills kicking around," he noted, including one aimed at Syria, which failed to pass last year but now "has some steam behind it."

Burma is a member of the World Trade Organization, which entitles it to the same treatment for its exports as other WTO members. So if the proposed ban on Burmese imports is implemented, Rangoon would presumably file a complaint with the WTO, and it might win the right to impose a ban on imports of U.S. goods.

That is a matter of little practical consequence, since U.S. exports to Burma total only about $10 million a year -- less than one-one-thousandth of 1 percent of total exports -- and the legislation would ban those exports anyway. But the administration is concerned enough about appearing to flout WTO rules that Powell's article warned of the need to "take into account our WTO obligations." He endorsed other provisions of the bills, including a freeze on the junta's financial assets.

For now, concerns about WTO rules do not seem likely to halt the march toward sanctions, given the widespread sentiment that the oppression by the generals in Rangoon has reached intolerable levels.

Even longtime critics of sanctions, such as Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.), backed McConnell's bill. Asked to explain the apparent change of heart, Lugar's spokesman, Andrew Fisher, said that although the senator "has been opposed to unilateral sanctions . . . the world is well united against the regime in Burma," and may join an embargo if Washington leads.

But Burma's main trading partners, including China and Thailand, have voiced unwillingness to go the sanctions route, and if that continues to be the case, "U.S. sanctions, or even more broadly, Western sanctions, probably aren't going to have much of an impact," said Elliott. Still, she said, "I think somehow, the regime does need to be confronted over its behavior."
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Old 06-15-2003, 11:41 PM   #22
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Envoy Sees Chance of Burma Talks

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia -- U.N. special envoy Razali Ismail said Friday that he believed further mediation coupled with international pressure could win release of detained Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and lead to a political settlement between the opponents and the government.

Razali, the first foreigner to see Suu Kyi after a brutal crackdown on her pro-democracy movement two weeks ago, said divisions within the government offered hope that the two sides could resume talks.

"My job is to use this [division] to try to pry open the door as widely as I can," he said in his first extensive interview since leaving Rangoon, the Burmese capital, on Tuesday. "We have to begin to talk to the people who are pragmatists to see what can be done quickly."
For the full article:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2003Jun13.html
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Old 06-16-2003, 10:52 PM   #23
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slightly off topic, but....

Has anyone here visited Myanmar? Any thoughts on how the form of government is affecting the people? What is the country like?
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Old 06-17-2003, 08:40 PM   #24
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This I found while looking for articles about Suu Kyi. Still haven't received any newsletters and this is the longest it's ever been between newsletters. I wonder if they are being threatened in some way or if some of the people injured in the attack actually handled the newsletters. I have always gotten at least one a week sometimes 2 or 3. Just weird....
This reporter went there and his article is interesting:

I Went To Burma. Bad Move
A Place Where Tourism Carries Political Baggage
By Steve Hendrix
Sunday, June 15, 2003;

Burma has been high on my must-see list for decades. It's one of those cloaked-in-mystery countries, still wearing the veils of jungle secrecy so celebrated by Kipling and Orwell. Few Westerners go to Burma, which alone makes it irresistible. Add Burma's reputation for unspoiled natural beauty and deep cultural traditions, and its siren call reaches clear around the world.

It was only recently that it seemed appropriate to be a tourist in Burma. This is a government credibly accused of trafficking in narcotics, imprisoning dissidents and forcing citizens onto road gangs and children into the army. In 1990, Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy won national elections in a landslide. The military regime ignored the vote, crushed the party and sent Suu Kyi into the purgatory of house arrest for most of the decade.

The entire article is here;

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2003Jun13.html

And:
Nine Asian Nations Call for Suu Kyi's Release
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2003Jun16.html
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Old 06-18-2003, 01:14 PM   #25
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Latest article i found this morning...

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp..._nm/myanmar_dc
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Old 06-18-2003, 02:43 PM   #26
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Ergh...NOT encouraging....



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Old 06-18-2003, 07:38 PM   #27
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Bad news.........
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Old 06-19-2003, 12:14 AM   #28
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Happy Birthday Aung San Suu Kyi... We'll See you when you get home....
Walk On. And if the darkness is to keep us apart
And if the daylight feels like it's a long way off
And if your glass heart should crack
And for a second you turn back
Oh no, be strong

Walk on, walk on
What you got they can't steal it
No they can't even feel it
Walk on, walk on...
Stay safe tonight

My God....Please!!!!

Red Cross to Meet Myanmar Detainees

The Associated Press
Wednesday, June 18, 2003; 11:23 PM


YANGON, Myanmar - Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi spent her 58th birthday Thursday locked up in an undisclosed place by a military government that defied demands by foreign government to free her.

Even Myanmar's partners in the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations have told the generals of the junta to free Suu Kyi quickly, a remarkable departure from the group's policy of not commenting on each other's internal affairs.

"The brutal rulers of Burma need to understand that the only acceptable way forward is to release Aung San Suu Kyi and her supporters and to resume dialogue with her and with her party," Secretary of State Colin Powell told a news conference Wednesday in Cambodia.

Nobel Peace laureate Suu Kyi has been held incommunicado since May 30, following violent clashes in northern Myanmar where she was on a tour. The government says the violence started when her motorcade tried to plow through a group of pro-junta demonstrators.

Myanmar authorities on Wednesday refused a Red Cross request to see Suu Kyi, but the group said Wednesday it will be allowed to see other people held in connection to political violence in northern Myanmar last month.

Members of her National League for Democracy have also been detained since the May 30 violence.

World leaders ranging from U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan to President Bush have issued strong appeals for Suu Kyi's immediate release and the restoration of political freedom for her party.

So far the only independent observer known to have seen Suu Kyi since her detention is Razali Ismail, the U.N. secretary general's special envoy to Myanmar, on June 10.

"The International Committee of the Red Cross is given access to all persons detained in connection with the event on May 30 with one exception," Michel Ducreaux, the regional representative of the ICRC in Myanmar, said after meeting Wednesday with Home Minister Col. Tin Hlaing.

"You know who that one exception is," Ducreaux said in a clear reference to Suu Kyi, whom he'd been asked about for several days.

Ducreaux didn't mention Suu Kyi by name, but instead made a point of saying he could meet Tin Oo, the 76-year-old vice chairman of Suu Kyi's party, and others.

World leaders ranging from U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan to President Bush have issued strong appeals for Suu Kyi's immediate release and the restoration of political freedom for her party, many of whose offices have been closed by the authorities since the incident.

The government described the May 30 violence as a clash between members of Suu Kyi's party and government supporters. It said four people died and about 50 were hospitalized. But opposition accounts portrayed the incident as a brutal, government-organized ambush of Suu Kyi's entourage in which as many as 70 people may have died.

On Tuesday, a government spokesman said 46 of those detained after the incident had been released, but did not give the number of those who were "called in for questioning." The ICRC has confirmed the release of 22 people.

Some National League for Democracy members, including would-be Members of Parliament, have been sent home, NLD officials said on condition of anonymity.

Myanmar's ruling military junta, which came to power in 1988, refused to step down after Suu Kyi's party won a 1990 general election. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991 and has spent most of the time since then under house arrest or strict surveillance.

2003 The Associated Press
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Old 06-23-2003, 08:53 PM   #29
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There still isn't anything coming from the Free Burma Coalition. I wonder if Suu Kyi's life was threatened if theycontinued to send out emails. This was in the Washington Post today:

Suu Kyi's Conditions Said 'Deplorable'

The Associated Press
Monday, June 23, 2003; 4:22 PM


UNITED NATIONS - U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan on Monday decried the "truly deplorable" conditions under which Myanmar's military government is holding pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and again urged her immediate release.

Annan was concerned that Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, was reportedly being held in Insein Jail outside the Myanmar capital, Yangon, according to a statement from his spokesman's office.

He also said his special envoy had informed him she was detained under a law protecting the state against subversive elements.

Annan "considers the conditions under which she is being held - incommunicado and without charge - to be truly deplorable," the statement said.

Suu Kyi, the leader of the National League for Democracy has been detained since a clash between her supporters and government backers on May 30 in northern Myanmar.

Political prisoners in Myanmar, also known as Burma, are often not released even when they have completed their sentences.

Suu Kyi's detention has stirred international outrage, and the United States, the European Union and Britain have initiated sanctions to press for her release. The U.S. sanctions would bar most trade, dealing a harsh blow to Myanmar's export earnings.

On Monday, Japanese Senior Vice Foreign Minister Tetsuro Yano met with the No. 3 leader in Myanmar's military government, Gen. Khin Nyunt, to urge Suu Kyi's release. He was expected to deliver a message from Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi calling for her freedom.

In his statement, Annan urged "the government of Myanmar again to heed the repeated calls of the United Nations and the international community ... to immediately release (Suu Kyi) and other members" of her party.

He also called on the government to acknowledge the people of Myanmar are "overwhelmingly in favor of change and to join hands with all parties," to bring about national reconciliation in Myanmar as soon as possible.

Myanmar's military government maintains Suu Kyi is being detained for her own protection, and that the clash occurred when her supporters tried to drive through a crowd of people protesting her party's behavior. It said four people died and dozens were injured.
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Old 06-23-2003, 09:30 PM   #30
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Here's the link to Amnesy's petition! Please sign!

http://web.amnesty.org/pages/mmr-040603-petition-eng

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