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Old 03-28-2005, 06:19 AM   #46
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Did you feel your country had betrayed you when you found the horror that is Peeps on your store shelves?
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Old 03-28-2005, 06:37 AM   #47
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Originally posted by bammo2
lmao you beat me to it ewen

Yeah, i wasn't being 'funny' either by asking who he meant by 'Conan', I really didn't think he meant Connor MacLeod. In fact I asked someone and they thought he may have been refering to Conan O'Brien.

Sorry Dave, you genuinely had me confused.
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Old 03-28-2005, 06:44 AM   #48
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Originally posted by LarryMullen's_POPAngel
Did you feel your country had betrayed you when you found the horror that is Peeps on your store shelves?
Well, as you know, I was initially thrilled to see them. However, on closer inspection they definately looked like they were concocted in Satan's kitchen.

Saying that though, have comfort in knowing that if you're American, love Peeps and ever visit Edinburgh then I can take you to a shop that sells them.
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Old 03-28-2005, 06:51 AM   #49
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Originally posted by ewen

However, on closer inspection they definately looked like they were concocted in Satan's kitchen.

Quote of the day. PERIOD.
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Old 03-28-2005, 10:24 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally posted by ewen



four seasons?


yeah.....salt, pepper, more salt and more pepper.




ummm, U2Girl1978, have you ever been out of the USA?



yes.....spring, summer, autumn and winter!





anyway....


Haggis is the national dish of Scotland. It is both beloved and reviled by the natives. It often horrifies people who hear it described for the first time. I find it funny that the USDA has declared them "unfit for human consumption".

I think there is an Americanised version of Haggis. Do you like Haggis?
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Old 03-28-2005, 11:04 AM   #51
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I think there is an Americanised version of Haggis. Do you like Haggis?

I'm sure indeed there are Americanised Haggis.


Yes, I love Haggis. See answer to Rono's question "Haggis or fish and Chips?"
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Old 03-28-2005, 12:50 PM   #52
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Originally posted by ewen


People from the US are often confused about the UK and mistakingly refer to the UK as 'England' when in fact England is only one of the four. This greatly upsets/annoys people from the other three countries/states when the UK is refered to as 'England'.

I hate this.

hello from a highland lassie (from Thurso, 120 miles north of Inverness)
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Old 03-28-2005, 12:54 PM   #53
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Do you like deep-fried Mars bars?

What are the 3 best places in Scotland to hike?

What do you think about efforts to preserve the Scottish language? Worthy cause, or lost cause?

I assume Edinburgh isn't anywhere near as multicultural as London--is that correct? Is the prospect of further change in that direction (in Edinburgh or elsewhere) cause for concern among those who want to preserve a distinct Scottish identity? (Or perhaps Scottish identity is simply not a big political issue...?)
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Old 03-28-2005, 01:23 PM   #54
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Originally posted by smooshcat


I hate this.

hello from a highland lassie (from Thurso, 120 miles north of Inverness)
I hate this too

and I'm english
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Old 03-28-2005, 05:32 PM   #55
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I have no idea what this peeps thing is! Am i thick?
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Old 03-29-2005, 01:47 AM   #56
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Do you like deep-fried Mars bars?
Never tried it, never wanted to. I try to avoid junk or fast foods as much as possible. The chippies (chip shops) tried deep-fried easter eggs i believe. yuk.


Quote:
What are the 3 best places in Scotland to hike?
There's the famous "West Highland Way" - it's a 95 mile walk from Milngavie (outside Glasgow), along the shore of Loch Lomond (Scotland's largest loch/lake) and along Ranoch Moor to the foot of Ben Nevis (the UK's largest mountain).



Scotland has little Mosquitos called Midgies - although they don't spread disease, they bite and are therefore extremely annoying. Best times to avoid the Midgies is April to June.

a good site for hiking/walking is http://www.maketracks.net/

Quote:
What do you think about efforts to preserve the Scottish language? Worthy cause, or lost cause?
Not sure if you mean 'Scots' or 'Gaelic' - Scotland had two languages other than English. I'm assuming you mean Gaelic though.

a little history:
The Hanovarians took over the monarchy of Scotland and England from the Stewarts in the 18th century. The Stewarts were descendants of James 6th of Scotland / James 1st of England (the first King to rule both countries). Well, there were a few uprisings from Jacobites (followers of James / the Stewarts) who believed that a Stewart monarch should rule. Anyway, as a result of the failed uprisings the government attacked all aspects of Highland culture including Gaelic. The Highland clearances destroyed many Gaelic-speaking communities.

In mid 1970s, there began a renaissance to create new generations of Scottish Gaelic speakers. Personally, I started to learn Gaelic at school, when I was about nine or ten, and even sang it solo and in choirs at competitions. However, my High School unfortunately didn't give lessons and so, due to that and my non-gaelic-speaking family, I never continued.

Gaelic is gradually being reincorporated into public life for the time in two centuries. The naming of official bodies in gaelic was virtually unknon whereas now there are hundreds, including banks and other businesses who have adopted a Gaelic name.

I am all for the efforts to 'preserve' the language, it's definately not a lost cause - there are families, communities that speak Gaelic as their first language. The 2001 census of Scotland recorded that there were nearly 60,000 Gaelic speakers in the country, mostly living in the Western Isles, Central belt and northern Highlands. It will never take over English as the main language of the country. It's as likely as Spanish becoming the main language of the USA.

Quote:
I assume Edinburgh isn't anywhere near as multicultural as London--is that correct? Is the prospect of further change in that direction (in Edinburgh or elsewhere) cause for concern among those who want to preserve a distinct Scottish identity? (Or perhaps Scottish identity is simply not a big political issue...?) [/B]
That's a big question that dissertations have been written on and would require a thread all on its own. That is a huge subject.

I think Edinburgh is definately multicultural but as multicultural as London? I don't know, probably not. Is becoming more multicultural a concern to people here? No, I don't think so.

The Declaration of Arbroath suggests a multicultural basis for Scots identity. It adapts Galatians 3:28 in the Bible by asserting that in the "community of the realm": "There is neither weighting nor distinction of Jew and Greek*, Scotsman or Englishman."

* Biblical reference to 'Greeks' is generally understood to imply people of other faiths ('gentiles').

It's a real difficult question for me to answer - I need to know what you personally mean by multicultural and why you would suggest that Edinburgh may not be.
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Old 03-29-2005, 02:00 AM   #57
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I have no idea what this peeps thing is! Am i thick?
Ask LarryMullen's_POPAngel, she loves them long time.



I had asked a similar question and was promptly informed. They're marshmallows shaped in the form of creatures such as chicks or bunnys, from the USA I think. Anyway, I found them for sale in a shop recently and told LarryMullen's_POPAngel.
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Old 03-29-2005, 02:00 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally posted by ewen
When you say "kilt pattern", you're meaning "tartan".

The use of different patterns and colours of tartan to identify different families, or 'clans', is a very contentious issue amongst historians. In the absence of any real evidence to the contrary, it seems that this practice dates back only as far as the early 19th century. Prior to this, clansmen of all standing seemed to have worn a mixture of tartans without any sense of a standardised 'clan' design.

There's no hard and fast rules or regulations about which tartan to adopt although people do prefer to choose a tartan associated to their family name.

If there's no tartan for your family name, simply look up your ancestory until you can find a surname that has a tartan. Failing that there are tartans that anyone can wear. If you want to be unique - any individual, family or institution can commission and register their own tartan.

It's easy for me, my surname is Young and there is a 'Young' tartan:



I got a kilt made a few years ago for my graduation.
I thought the tartans were connected to clans not surnames. Your surname may be Young but are you Clan Young?
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Old 03-29-2005, 04:15 AM   #59
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I thought the tartans were connected to clans not surnames. Your surname may be Young but are you Clan Young?
It is a very contentious issue. It is a myth that you must have an "entitlement" in order to have the right to wear a particular tartan. There are numerous websites devoted to clans where it is stated that only fellow clansmen are entitled to wear 'their' tartan. Some tartans were/are associated to areas of Scotland. Some organisations have their own tartan - Glasgow Rangers and Glasgow Celtic have their own tartan. There's even a Safeway tartan!

The April 1987 issue of the "Highlander" showed "Young of Auldbar" as a dormant clan, dating to 1672 in Scotland. Edward A Young III of Orlando, Florida contacted the Lord Lyon (body that regulates the use of clan coats of arms etc) and was given permission to convene Clan Young, and to display the arms and crest of Peter Young of Auldbar, the last Clan chief of the Youngs. Clan Young convened January 9, 1988 at Orlando, Florida, where it was formally organised a year later with the election of it's first officers.

On January 1,1992 The Scottish Tartans Society granted a Certificate of Accreditation for the Young tartan. It is similar to the Douglas tartan, of which Clan Young have long been a sept, with the stripe of the Christina Young tartan replacing the stripe of white.

Clan Young Society membership is open to anyone who is descendant of any Scottish person surnamed Young or "to anyone with an interest in the Youngs of Scotland, their history, and things Scottish"!

So, yes and no to tartans being associated to clans. I am not a member of Clan Young but the tartan was indeed designed and/or registered by them I believe. My surname is Young, so that is the most obvious tartan to choose for my kilt.
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Old 03-29-2005, 04:24 AM   #60
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I dont believe its a myth. The same way the right to heraldic sheilds is not automatic if a person should happen to have the same surname.

My last name is Scottish. Clan MacAllister if I recall correctly, but I could be wrong. (Actually Im almost sure Im wrong) My family aren't of the right family to wear the tartan though.
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