American stereotype of Italian men may be wrong - Page 2 - U2 Feedback

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Old 06-28-2005, 04:15 PM   #16
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I don't believe in stereotypes, but many Italian men are chauvinists. Neanderthalism however is an equal opportunity trait.

It is nice just to be treated w/ kindness, decency, and respect-is that too much to ask for? Seems so
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Old 06-28-2005, 05:00 PM   #17
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u2bonogirl, what were your European friends stereotype of Americans? I'm curious.

thanks
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Old 06-29-2005, 12:00 AM   #18
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The only Italian man I know in depth is my 85 year old uncle, from Sicily.
He's a roar. Still goes clubbing at his age, drives an Escalade and stays out till 1am.
He DOES use the explicit language and often is male chauvinistic in some ways...but he's pretty cool in my book.
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Old 06-29-2005, 12:08 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by najeena
u2bonogirl, what were your European friends stereotype of Americans? I'm curious.

thanks
Just a few things...
We're rude
and pushy
That we believe we are superior in some ways
And that we're uncultured
But they also did say that it was an unfair stereotype. But still out there
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Old 06-29-2005, 12:16 AM   #20
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we got to keep the president off tv
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Old 06-29-2005, 12:16 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally posted by joyfulgirl
sitting in front of the TV eating Nutella out of the jar for dinner."


Yikes! I think I might be an Italian man.
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Old 06-29-2005, 01:36 AM   #22
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hey, when i lived in Brussels i did that.

this was usually after a trip to Amsterdam.

Did you live in Brussels, Irvine? How did you like it here?

Ah, Amsterdam...the good ol' munchies
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Old 06-29-2005, 01:50 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally posted by Irvine511



hey, when i lived in Brussels i did that.

this was usually after a trip to Amsterdam.

Nutella costst a fortune on the black market in Amsterdam.
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Old 06-29-2005, 02:19 AM   #24
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My family background is Italian and I've travelled there 3 times. The whole Italian Sopranos, Godfather is so much bullshit - I've never seen anything like that anywhere (but then, they are American inventions ). Italians (and especially Northern Italians) are cultured, funny, elegant and proud, and they know all about feminism.
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Old 06-29-2005, 02:24 AM   #25
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Well of course the godfather stuff was an American invention - they were dealing with Sicilian families who had established little crime empires in the US. Stands to reason that doesn't represent Italians or anything else for that matter.
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Old 06-29-2005, 03:58 AM   #26
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hee hee. The fun thing about that is, some Italian girls like Northern Europeans better - not only for their blonde hair but also because Italian boys

live with their parents and grandparents up to 30 y.o. or longer
no.1 is a hot car, not a hot woman

However, I have met some nice, gentle Italian men.

Generally it is true that women have a lot of power in relationships.. I remember when I came home from work 20 minutes late, my Italian ex-girlfriend opened the window when I was entering the house, crying down "And where have you been staying for so long". It was very funny, she acted like a housewive from Naples who´d just hung the clothes out over the street to dry I laughed my ass off, went up there, took her in my arms, and ate the Minestrone she had prepared for me.. lol.
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Old 06-29-2005, 08:23 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally posted by the soul waits


Did you live in Brussels, Irvine? How did you like it here?

Ah, Amsterdam...the good ol' munchies


i did live in Brussels for a little over a year in 2000-2001. i lived a ways from the center in Boitsford, which is a lovely little village with the best Farmer's Market i have ever seen in my entire life on Sundays.

i enjoyed Brussels, though there was an adjustment period and quite a bit of loneliness. i had just graduated from college as well, and adjusting to life as an adult. i found the weather dreary, but the food excellent, as well as the cultural opportunities, huge international population, delicious beer, and the ease of travel to London, Paris, and Amsterdam. it took a little while to meet people, but i wound up with a nice group of very international friends made up of equal parts Belgians, Germans, Irish, Swedes, English, and Americans.

i spent a lot of time at Le Bizon, Booze and Blues, and in and around Place St. Germaine ... though i'm starting to forget the names of some of the bars i used to frequent ...
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Old 06-29-2005, 08:28 AM   #28
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I dont know that specific town you speak off, you sure about the spelling?

I'm glad you had a good time here.
It's such a small country allthough that has the advantage that you can cross the borders quickly as well and find yourself "abroad" within the hour.
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Old 06-29-2005, 08:31 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally posted by the soul waits
I dont know that specific town you speak off, you sure about the spelling?

I'm glad you had a good time here.
It's such a small country allthough that has the advantage that you can cross the borders quickly as well and find yourself "abroad" within the hour.


just checked -- i think it's spelled Boitsfort. it was directly south of the center, right on the outskirts, but still within the Ring.

i was an intern at the International School of Brussels, which was a 5 minute walk from my apartment.

oh, the stories i have ... it was a great year, very hard at times (as anyone who's ever been an expat will tell you), but it was all worth it.

i'm now an expert on international beers, with Belgian being a special area of interest.
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Old 06-29-2005, 08:43 AM   #30
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Ah, you mean Bekkevoort? Lol, I probably didn't recognize the name since we don't speak english here in daily life.

Beers, yes!
Also, did you taste our specialty : french fries? There's nothingh french about them, we invented them and are experts at them,

I can imagine it was hard here at times, I personally hated every second of my university years - the student life clashed with my personality, and that's putting it mildly.

Also, Belgians are pretty reserved people and it can get hard to get acquainted with someone, beyond the daily "hi, how are you"-greetings.
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