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Old 03-02-2008, 05:29 PM   #1
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AFFIRMATIVE ACTION ! Where does OBAMA stand?

This issue is important to me.

If Obama is going to be the President
he will have a lot of influence on this issue.
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Old 03-02-2008, 05:38 PM   #2
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Affirmative action is important to you? How so?
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Old 03-02-2008, 06:51 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally posted by Diemen
Affirmative action is important to you?
How so?
yes.


I am an American

Clinton had a policy

Bush has a policy


What is the Obama Affirmative Action policy?
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Old 03-02-2008, 07:17 PM   #4
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Nice dodge.

I'll take that to mean "I don't really care about it, but I've noticed that Obama hasn't announced an official position on it during his campaign, so I'll jump on the opportunity to point it out as a shortcoming."

Suffice it to say that affirmative action is not a key issue this election cycle. None of the remaining candidates list it as an issue on their website. However, a simple google search reveals plenty.

I'll let you do the reading since the issue is important to you.

Barack Obama on Affirmative Action

Hillary Clinton on Affirmative Action

John McCain on Affirmative Action
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Old 03-03-2008, 10:28 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally posted by Diemen
Affirmative action is important to you? How so?
It's important to me, too.
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Old 03-20-2008, 06:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by deep
Clinton had a policy
Quote:
Affirmative action: mend it, don’t end it

The Supreme Court rejected the notion that we could ever be separate but equal, and Democrats and Republicans alike passed laws against discrimination and created affirmative action programs to redress centuries of wrongs for minorities and women.

Affirmative action was intended to give everybody a fair chance, but it hasn’t always worked smoothly & fairly. Today there are those who are determined to put an end to affirmative action, as if the purposes for which it was created have been achieved. They have not. Until they are, we need to mend affirmative action, most certainly, but not end it.

That is exactly what we are trying to do: end abuses, prohibit quotas, subject affirmative action to strict review, oppose any benefits to those who aren’t qualified, but make that extra effort to see that everyone has not a guarantee, but a chance.
Source: Between Hope and History, by Bill Clinton, p.132 Jan 1, 1996


Quote:
Originally posted by deep
Bush has a policy

Quote:
Affirmative action: end it.

Q: What are your feelings about affirmative action?

A: Yes, racism exists. I’m not going to be making policy based on guilt. The fundamental question in certain neighborhoods is, how do we break a sense that the system isn’t meant for me? You need mentoring programs. Part of it has to do with there isn’t the entrepreneurial system being passed from one generation to the next.
Source: Interview with Time Magazine, CNN.com/Time.com Aug 1, 2000

Quote:
Originally posted by deep
What is the Obama Affirmative Action policy?
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Old 03-20-2008, 07:34 PM   #7
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I gave you links for material on all 3 candidates' positions, deep. Did you not even bother reading one?

And you still haven't answered my original question. And while we're at unanswered questions, you posted before that you greatly admired Bill Clinton. I asked you what characteristics and/or traits he had that Obama is lacking and you never got back to me. I'd really appreciate if you could provide a response to that. In something beyond cryptic 4 word sentences.
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Old 03-20-2008, 07:35 PM   #8
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Bush sounds like such a bigot in that quote. And he makes no sense. If Bush agrees that racism exists then his policy wouldn't be based on guilt. If racism didn't exist then it would be. Typical dumb Dubya

Clinton's policy sounds like typical centrism...not saying I want to eliminate AA but paying lip-service to limitations in order to appease the "poor oppressed white man" camp.
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Old 03-20-2008, 09:08 PM   #9
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Affirmative Action mostly benefits white women. Therefore, we'll know Obama's stance if he selects Clinton for VP
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Old 03-21-2008, 09:07 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by Diemen
In something beyond cryptic 4 word sentences.
You are asking for something yet to be seen, here.
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Old 03-21-2008, 10:55 PM   #11
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Bush's family in Greenwich were prejudice WASPs. His grandfather supported planned parenthood so there would be less poor and minorities. Besides there is the civil rights act and it's violated by employers all the time especially in hiring older workers. I have a feeling that ageism is going to be the biggest issue and more people over 40 are going to sue for age discrimination in the work place.
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Old 03-21-2008, 11:11 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by watergate
His grandfather supported planned parenthood so there would be less poor and minorities.
What?

Did he actually say that was why he supported it, or are you saying that supporting planned parenthood = wanting less poor and minorities around?
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:48 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by CTU2fan
Bush sounds like such a bigot in that quote. And he makes no sense.
"Yes, racism exists. I’m not going to be making policy based on guilt."

Is he suggesting there that he is the one guilty of being a racist?

Affirmative action has nothing to do with guilt anyway.
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Old 03-26-2008, 02:13 AM   #14
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Obama stands for Affirmative Action!



Quote:
Obama, Clinton cited by those seeking to extend ‘civil rights initiatives’

The Washington Post
updated 9:10 p.m. PT, Tues., March. 25, 2008

CHICAGO - Sixteen months after voters in Michigan voted to kill affirmative action in the public sphere, opponents of preferences based on race and gender are pushing five more states to ban the practice.

Foes of affirmative action, which is meant to address current and historical inequities, delivered 128,744 signatures to Colorado authorities earlier this month. Similar organizations in Arizona, Missouri, Oklahoma and Nebraska are circulating petitions as civil rights groups and educators are mobilizing to defeat the measures.

The initiatives are spearheaded by Ward Connerly, the nation's most prominent opponent of affirmative action, who said he has raised about $1.5 million for the campaigns. He sees the November ballot initiatives as the next step in his drive to end preferences in public education, hiring and contracting.

"Without any doubt, we have to understand that race preferences are on the way out," said Connerly, who heads to Missouri next week to deliver speeches on behalf of that state's constitutional amendment, now tangled in a court battle over the ballot measure's wording.

In the states where Connerly's self-described "civil rights initiative" appears on the ballot, voters are likely to see it alongside the name of the first black or female major-party presidential candidate, Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) or Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) Connerly contends that the success of Obama and Clinton shows that preferences are no longer necessary "to compensate for, quote, institutional racism and institutional sexism."

Obama opposes supporter's measure
Connerly, a prosperous and conservative black Republican, said he contributed $500 to Obama's campaign to honor him "for trying to take race out of the body politic." Obama opposes Connerly's approach to affirmative action and lent his voice to a 2006 radio ad opposing the Connerly-sponsored Proposition 2 in Michigan. (The Obama campaign would not comment on whether it is keeping the money.)

Obama is not alone. Opponents of Connerly's effort are using legal challenges and grass-roots organizing techniques to keep the measures off the ballot, or to defeat them.

"As we feared, Connerly's attack on equal opportunity in Michigan has metastasized," said Wade Henderson, president of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights. "We know that most Americans support equal opportunity. They know that diversity is good for business, good for the classroom and ultimately good for the country."

Henderson dismissed Connerly's reference to Obama as a willingness to "seize on any factoid to justify his assault on equal opportunity" and added: "I am not surprised he would lift up the performance of Barack to say that race no longer matters in American life. That's a gross overstatement of the lives of most Americans."
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Old 03-28-2008, 08:53 AM   #15
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Obama’s Postracial Test

How will the Democratic candidate deal with potentially divisive ballot initiatives calling for an end to affirmative action?
Seth Colter Walls
Newsweek Web Exclusive
Updated: 4:36 PM ET Mar 27, 2008

The next test of Barack Obama's "postracial" persona may come from some unlikely places: Arizona, Colorado, Missouri, Nebraska and Oklahoma. That's where Ward Connerly, the country's most innovative and successful opponent of affirmative action over the past decade, is launching an effort to get an initiative on the ballots that would prohibit public institutions from considering race, sex or ethnicity in areas such as hiring and college admissions. Connerly's political savvy on matters of race is worth considering. Since cutting his teeth in 1996 as a key backer of the California ballot initiative known as Proposition 209--which amended the state Constitution to prohibit affirmative action in the public sphere--Connerly has steered successful ballot drives in Washington and Michigan to do the same.

His decision to target these five states in 2008 has less to do with their electoral impact than the fact they allow for ballot initiatives and that Connerly thinks he can win big in all of them. But given Obama's oft-declared intention to redraw the political map, it's hard to see how he can avoid the issue of affirmative action in some, if not all, of the states Connerly is targeting.

Mounting a ballot initiative in even one state, much less five, can be prohibitively expensive and logistically tough. Thousands of voter signatures have to be gathered in support and verified months ahead of time, all while building a war chest to pay for issue ads in the fall. But Connerly, who describes himself as one-quarter black, appears to have a wealthy donor base; his nonprofit American Civil Rights Institute has drawn big contributions from right-wing tycoons like Rupert Murdoch (two donations totaling $300,000 during one 2003 campaign) and Joseph Coors (a $250,000 loan for the same race). (Connerly is not required to disclose current donations. Those donor disclosures were compelled due to a California lawsuit over that particular campaign, though current contributions to his group are private by law.)

Obama has yet to take a definitive public stance on affirmative action in this campaign, but he did voice a radio ad in opposition to Connerly's successful 2006 campaign in Michigan. Darren Davis, a professor of political science at Notre Dame, calls the emerging Connerly question "one of the most profound" of Obama's campaign--especially in the wake of the controversy over his former pastor, Jeremiah Wright. "Basically, on every racial issue Barack Obama is walking the tightrope," Davis says. "The more he supports traditional black issues like affirmative action, the more that will eat into his white base of support." Obama has been careful when broaching this issue; in a 2007 ABC News interview he suggested that the affirmative action of the future should consider economic status more than race.

If Connerly's successful in making this an issue for Obama, it wouldn't be the first time state ballot initiatives affected a presidential campaign. In a forthcoming study, political scientists Todd Donovan, Caroline Tolbert and Daniel A. Smith claim that in 2004, voters in the 13 states that offered anti-gay-marriage initiatives or referenda were more likely to consider that issue as being important in the presidential race, compared with voters in states with no such campaigns. Stephen Nicholson, author of "Voting the Agenda," says other research suggests that the initiatives' influence spilled over into the national electorate at large. "By putting an issue on the ballot, what you wind up doing is giving an institutional push to an issue that voters may not have deemed relevant," Nicholson says. "By qualifying an initiative on a ballot, or multiple ballots, you are putting it side by side with the candidates." This year, that is exactly what Connerly wants to do.

Some Democrats suspected the GOP of coordinating the gay-marriage initiatives as a way of rallying support and getting out the vote of the right. Connerly, however, appears to be a genuinely independent actor, if one with a wealthy donor base. Given his perfect record thus far in passing initiatives where they have qualified for the ballot, and his high-profile support from pillars of the right (including National Review president Thomas Rhodes), it's a good bet that Connerly will have the resources to mount serious campaigns this year in the states he's targeted.

Moreover, Connerly says the strength of Obama's candidacy only highlights why affirmative action is no longer relevant. "How can you have a self-identified black man running for the highest office for the land [while] defending preferences based on race?" Connerly asks. "It reinforces the logic of our initiatives."

Calling this kind of analysis "a very big leap of faith," Davis says Obama's individual rise tells us little about the value of affirmative action to average African-Americans--though he admits this is nevertheless the way in which many voters will evaluate the phenomenon of his viability. "This is the exact type of information that voters use to confirm what they already believe about race," he says. What's more, Davis claims, Obama's campaign tactics have, in an ironic twist, invited Connerly's challenge. "Obama himself has not attributed his success to any of the structural success [on race] in American society," Davis says. "The Obama campaign exudes this individualism and this perseverance that people who are against affirmative action have used against the African-American community."

In his March 18 speech on race, Obama recounted his first experience of the biblical stories being voiced at Trinity United Church of Christ as being both "black, and more than black." To many, it proved an inspiring riff on Walt Whitman's American notion of containing multitudes. But when it comes to affirmative action, many voters may continue to see the issue in stark shades of black and white.
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