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Old 03-21-2007, 05:57 PM   #1
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A sad local story I wanted to share.

As I was having lunch today I opened up the local section in the paper and read this. What a bright future she would have had. I was sad and teared up and felt angry that such a young life was taken away. I didn't know her but I felt empty after this. Why do we do this to our selves why do we kill for dumb reasons. RIP.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cg...AGIROOV051.DTL

Quote:



SAN FRANCISCO
Slain teen had made right choices
College-bound girl, 17, killed outside Bayview youth center had excelled, avoided trouble
Jaxon Van Derbeken, Chronicle Staff Writer

Wednesday, March 21, 2007
Antwanisha Morgan was making the right choices, having learned from her family's struggles as she grew up in San Francisco's troubled Bayview.

The 17-year-old was set to graduate from South San Francisco High School in June. She had spent four years preparing for college. She was about to go on a bus tour to check out universities in the South.

But her promising life was cut short when she was gunned down outside a Bayview community youth center where she and her brother had been Friday night, an innocent victim of apparent gang violence, police say.

The 8:11 p.m. shooting occurred 11 minutes after she left the youth services program at Bayview Hunters Point Foundation for Community Improvement, where her family said she was a volunteer.

Investigators say someone emerged from a car and opened fire, hitting her in the chest as she stood at Third Street and Quesada Avenue.

Her family remembered "Nisha,'' as she was known, as a 5-foot-1 dynamo who dreamed of becoming an actress but wanted to go to college to study forensics and criminal justice. She was hooked on television shows like "CSI" and "Law & Order," with family members always recording them for her when she was busy with after-school activities.

She stayed clear of gangs, said her mother, Malika Crosby.

"She avoided all that. She did not like that. She stayed on her brother, telling him about doing the right thing. About getting good grades. She was just a loving, caring person."

Crosby said that at one point, her daughter brought home a homeless family, which stayed at their condo in Daly City for six months. "She let them into my home. We ended up loving them, accepting them. We had big campouts in the living room."

Morgan, a senior, had worked as an anchor for South San Francisco High's TV morning announcements, said Principal Michael Coyne, who said the school had a moment of silence Monday in memory of the slain girl.

Coyne said Morgan was a "ball of energy" and a "great kid" who was part of a four-year program to assist college-bound students.

"What she wanted more than anything was to walk across the stage and get her diploma," he said.

The night she died, her family said, Morgan was with her brother at the community center while her mother was visiting with a friend after finishing up her shift as a clerk in the X-ray department at San Francisco General Hospital.

It was common that after school, Morgan and her brother would take the bus to Third Street, get a snack at their grandmother's house and then spend their time at the community center. Morgan had been volunteering there, helping kids do their homework, her family said.

About 7:40 p.m., Crosby, who was with a friend, drove up to take her son and daughter home. She said she saw her daughter talking to friends at the center; her son was with friends nearby. The mother and daughter shared some pizza served at the center, and Crosby told her daughter she was going on an errand.

"I told her, 'We will be back in five minutes,' '' Crosby said Tuesday. Crosby and her friend drove off to get a soda and then buy gas. While she was driving to get gas on Third, she said, she heard the siren of the ambulance coming to the shooting scene.

"All the police came flying past us, toward the scene," Crosby said. "My son was calling me on the cell phone, yelling and screaming. We flew back up there. We ran every light."

When they arrived, the ambulance had yet to get there. "I saw her laying there. I just dropped (fainted) a few feet from her."

The shooting scene was a block from where one of Morgan's grandmothers lives on Palou Avenue and where she spent much of her time growing up.

Morgan sang in the choir of the Providence Baptist Church in the Bayview, which she started attending at age 6. She also liked to act and dance.

"She was active in the church,'' said the pastor, the Rev. Calvin Jones Jr. "Her grandmother had raised her and kept her in church. She made sure she and her brother came to church."

Morgan on was on the Praise dance team and went to Bible study on Wednesday nights.

''She was such a friendly girl," Jones said. "She was so small -- she still looked like a little kid. But she was growing to be a young lady. We were helping her to take the college exam."

On April 1, Morgan was set to go on a bus tour of historically black universities in the South. She already had been accepted to four colleges, including Oklahoma State University and California State University East Bay, her family said.

She was raising money for the bus tour and had put on a play at the Bayview Opera House with an ensemble cast dealing with teen issues.

James McElroy, head of youth services at the community center, said his facility is the only one left for the area's youth because both local gyms have closed.

"They don't have anywhere to go," McElroy said. "There's no programs -- once we close (for the night), they have nowhere to go. I think that is the real story."

The family said that Morgan ended up being attacked at what was supposed to be a place of safety -- the local community center in the city where her mother worked and where she was raised.

"She was where she was supposed to be -- at the youth center, where you go to stay out of trouble," said her aunt, Juanita Miles, a former member of San Francisco's Commission on the Status of Women.

Miles said that Morgan was making the right choices in her life, only to have someone strike her down for no reason.

Morgan was the child of a teen mother. Her aunt, also a teen mother, was addicted to cocaine but says she has been clean for 17 years.

"We don't have a whole lot of children who are getting out, making those strides to get out," Miles said.

"For our family personally, she was breaking the cycle -- for us, all the women, she had been shown our mistakes, so she could avoid that stuff," Miles said. "She did that. She wasn't pregnant, she wasn't on drugs, wasn't running the streets boy-crazy. She was just a sweet kid, trying to make a difference in her life. To have her taken away, so ridiculously, the impact will be forever.

"This is one of the situations where these fools have no respect for any place," Miles said. "You can't make sense out of this nonsense. I guess, on a spiritual level, what would make a change is that somebody has to do some forgiveness. All this tit-for-tat violence. At some point, there has to be some sense of forgiveness.

"She has touched so many people, so many lives," Miles added. "We want this loss not to be in vain, but to actually bring about some cause for change in what is going on in our community, what is going on with our children."

E-mail Jaxon Van Derbeken at jvanderbeken@sfchronicle.com.

This article appeared on page B - 1 of the San Francisco Chronicle
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Old 03-21-2007, 06:03 PM   #2
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That's very sad, she was a beautiful girl and it sounds like she was special.

Why did they target her? The article makes it seem like it was definitely not random or accidental.
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Old 03-21-2007, 06:04 PM   #3
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Gang retalliation but I guess the gang killed the wrong person.
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Old 03-21-2007, 06:15 PM   #4
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Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen


Why did they target her? The article makes it seem like it was definitely not random or accidental.
We may never know the whole story, regardless it's a sad story.
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Old 03-21-2007, 06:32 PM   #5
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Old 03-21-2007, 07:01 PM   #6
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That is reallly sad. I'm sorry for her family.
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Old 03-21-2007, 07:48 PM   #7
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sounds like it was a gang initiation of some sorts or to prove how "hardcore" a gangbanger is by killing an innocent person.
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Old 03-22-2007, 06:09 AM   #8
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A little gun control would be nice...

RIP Antwanisha Morgan
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Old 03-30-2007, 06:31 PM   #9
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Quote:

Two arrested in high school senior's slaying in the Bayview

Heather Knight, Marisa Lagos and John Coté, Chronicle Staff Writer

Thursday, March 29, 2007

(03-28) 22:16 PDT -- About 50 people gathered Wednesday night at a candlelight vigil in the Bayview district to remember Antwanisha Morgan, a 17-year-old girl who was gunned down outside the Bayview community center March 16.

The vigil came on the same day police arrested two suspects in the shooting that also injured another person, Kamisha Gray, 22, of San Francisco, and a 14-year-old boy who was not identified because of his age, were booked on suspicion of murder, attempted murder, aggravated assault and conspiracy, police said.

Outside the community center Wednesday night, a big memorial of stuffed animals, candles, flowers and balloons rested against a light pole. Struggling to keep their candles lit in the wind, the crowd prayed, sang and carried signs reading "Stop the Violence" and "Change the Future of Youth."

Morgan's great-aunt, Juanita Miles, addressed the crowd and thanked them for their love and support. She also thanked whoever helped make Wednesday's arrest possible.

"Our family wants justice for Antwanisha," she said. "Whatever you did to help make that happen, thank you so much."

Morgan, a senior at South San Francisco High School, was leaving the Bayview Hunters Point Foundation for Community Improvement at Third Street and Quesada Avenue, where she volunteered, when she was killed shortly after 8 p.m.

According to Malika Crosby, Antwanisha Morgan's mother, witnesses reported that a car with four or five people drove up to the scene and that two people got out and started shooting. Police suspect Gray was driving, Crosby said.

Police spokesman Sgt. Steve Mannina declined to comment on details in the case, including who is suspected of having fired the shots and whether investigators are looking for more suspects. He said the investigation was continuing.

At the vigil, Denae Thompson, 16, said Morgan was her cousin and that she misses her terribly. She said kids in the neighborhood are bored and need more recreational opportunities and youth centers.

"If there were more things to do, a whole lot more kids would be off the streets," she said.

Tom Hendricks, a Bayview resident and a member of ACORN, an advocacy group that organized the vigil, demanded more resources and attention from City Hall.

"We live in San Francisco - one of the most progressive big cities in the United States," he said. "But when you bring up Bayview, it's treated as the ugly stepchild."

He said now - when the neighborhood is at the center of the city's efforts to redevelop it and keep the 49ers - was the perfect time to call for more youth programs, vocational education programs and job training.

"Now everyone's eyes and attention are focused here," he said. "Let's take advantage of that."

Earlier Wednesday after police announced the arrests, a handful of Morgan's relatives and friends -- some wearing T-shirts featuring pictures of the slain teen bearing the words, "An angel has received her wings" -- gathered at the home of Morgan's grandmother on Palou Avenue, where the teen often went after school. The home is just blocks from where she was shot.

"Hearing that took a load off me," Crosby said of the arrests. "I'm just tired of all this violence."

"I'm trying to hang in there and take it one day at a time," Crosby said softly.

Crosby said she did not know either suspect, and that police have told her that they are looking for more people tied to the shooting.

Police have said it's likely the violence was gang-related, and that Morgan appeared to be an innocent bystander.

"It wasn't meant for her. She wasn't at the wrong place at the wrong time, because she was there every day," Crosby said. "She was where she was supposed to be."

Crosby said her daughter may not have been able to run away because she was still in a business suit and high heels from a job interview earlier in the day with the city's Recreation and Park Department.

Morgan sang in the choir of the Providence Baptist Church in the Bayview and was part of a youth group that put on a play at the Bayview Opera House dealing with teen issues.

Morgan was going to study criminal justice in college, Crosby said. "That's what she believed in."

Miles said Morgan was going to be the first woman in the family to escape the pitfalls of urban life, such as teenage pregnancy.

"She was breaking the cycle," said Miles, a former member of the city's Commission on the Status of Women.

"I'm just glad (the arrests were) swift, so there's no retaliation," she said. "One of the things we asked for from the beginning is that there be no revenge."

But, she said, "under all this grief, there's a lot of rage. We are all enraged -- it's not just our family. We've met and talked and marched and congregated so many times. What's going to be different?"

Family members called for more active police patrols, seizure of illegal guns and increased funding for gymnasiums and youth programs in Bayview-Hunters Point.

"Our community cares, so where are our city leaders?" Miles said. "What are they going to do?"

About 1,500 people attended Morgan's funeral Friday.

Gray was being held without bail, and a date for her arraignment had not been set, sheriff's spokeswoman Eileen Hirst said.

Quote:

SAN FRANCISCO
Boy, 14, charged in drive-by slaying
Demian Bulwa, Chronicle Staff Writer

Friday, March 30, 2007

San Francisco District Attorney Kamala Harris charged a 14-year-old boy Thursday with murder in the slaying of Antwanisha Morgan, a 17-year-old girl who police said was an innocent victim in a drive-by shooting outside a Bayview community center on March 16.

Prosecutors declined to file charges against Kamisha Gray, a 22-year-old woman whom police had arrested early Wednesday along with the boy.

In a statement, Harris described the shooting, which also wounded a 17-year-old boy, as "cold-blooded murder" and a "senseless act of violence."

"I'm going to dedicate the power and resources of my office to ensuring that the person responsible is brought to justice," Harris wrote.

Harris' chief assistant prosecutor, Russ Giuntini, said the office is not ruling out the possibility of charging Gray in the future.

The decision to release Gray, and to charge the 14-year-old suspected shooter in juvenile rather than adult court, upset Morgan's relatives.

Juvenile murder suspects ages 14 to 17 are eligible to be tried as adults, meaning they can receive up to life sentences.

"We're very, very frustrated," said Juanita Miles of San Francisco, Morgan's great-aunt. "It sounded like, for once, there was going to be someone having to pay for these crimes."

Referring to the decision to charge the boy, who has not been identified, in juvenile court, Miles asked, "What kind of message are we telling the kids? If he is the shooter, why is he not being prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law?"

San Francisco police Sgt. Steve Mannina, a department spokesman, said Wednesday, "Because it's an active and open investigation, we're not commenting, but we do believe that it is a strong case."

Police arrested both the boy and Gray on suspicion of murder, attempted murder, aggravated assault and conspiracy.

On Thursday, the boy was charged with murder, assault with a semiautomatic firearm and shooting into an inhabited automobile.

Antwanisha, a senior at South San Francisco High School, was leaving the Bayview Hunters Point Foundation for Community Improvement at Third Street and Quesada Avenue, where she volunteered, when she was killed shortly after 8 p.m.

Morgan's mother, Malika Crosby, said police suspect that Gray was driving a car carrying three or four passengers.

Attempts to reach Gray's family were unsuccessful Wednesday. There was no answer at the Mission District apartment where the young woman lived.

E-mail Demian Bulwa at dbulwa@sfchronicle.com.

This article appeared on page B - 4 of the San Francisco Chronicle
Quote:
SAN FRANCISCO
Victim's mom 'tired of all this violence'
Arrest of woman, boy brings her some relief after daughter's killing
Marisa Lagos, John Coté and Heather Knight, Chronicle Staff Writers

Thursday, March 29, 2007

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More... The family of a 17-year-old girl who was gunned down outside a Bayview community center March 16 expressed relief Wednesday that police have arrested two suspects, but said they are angry about the violence that plagues the area.

"Hearing that took a load off me," Malika Crosby, Antwanisha Morgan's mother, said of the arrests. "I'm just tired of all this violence."

A handful of relatives and friends -- some wearing T-shirts featuring pictures of the slain teen bearing the words, "An angel has received her wings" -- gathered Wednesday at the home of Morgan's grandmother on Palou Avenue, where she often went after school. The home is just blocks from where she was shot.

"I'm trying to hang in there and take it one day at a time," Crosby said softly.

Earlier Wednesday, San Francisco police arrested Kamisha Gray, 22, of San Francisco, and a 14-year-old boy who was not identified because of his age, in connection with Morgan's killing and the wounding of another youth.

The two were booked on suspicion of murder, attempted murder, aggravated assault and conspiracy, police said. Gray was being held without bail, and a date for her arraignment had not been set, sheriff's spokeswoman Eileen Hirst said.

Crosby said she did not know either suspect, and that police have told her that they are looking for more people tied to the shooting.

Police have said it's likely the violence was gang-related, and that Morgan appeared to be an innocent bystander.

"It wasn't meant for her. She wasn't at the wrong place at the wrong time, because she was there every day," Crosby said. "She was where she was supposed to be."

Morgan, a senior at South San Francisco High School, was leaving the Bayview Hunters Point Foundation for Community Improvement at Third Street and Quesada Avenue, where she volunteered, when she was killed shortly after 8 p.m.

According to Crosby, witnesses reported that a car with four or five people drove up to the scene and that two people got out and started shooting. Police suspect Gray was driving, Crosby said.

Police spokesman Sgt. Steve Mannina declined to comment on details in the case, including who is suspected of having fired the shots and whether investigators are looking for more suspects. He said the investigation is continuing.

Crosby said her daughter may not have been able to run away because she was still in a business suit and high heels from a job interview earlier in the day with the city's Recreation and Park Department.

Morgan sang in the choir of the Providence Baptist Church in the Bayview and was part of a youth group that put on a play at the Bayview Opera House dealing with teen issues.

Morgan was going to study criminal justice in college, Crosby said. "That's what she believed in."

Her great-aunt, Juanita Miles, said Morgan was going to be the first woman in the family to escape the pitfalls of urban life, such as teenage pregnancy.

"She was breaking the cycle," said Miles, a former member of the city's Commission on the Status of Women.

"I'm just glad (the arrests were) swift, so there's no retaliation," she said. "One of the things we asked for from the beginning is that there be no revenge."

But, she said, "under all this grief, there's a lot of rage. We are all enraged -- it's not just our family. We've met and talked and marched and congregated so many times. What's going to be different?"

Family members called for more active police patrols, seizure of illegal guns and increased funding for gymnasiums and youth programs in Bayview-Hunters Point.

"Our community cares, so where are our city leaders?" Miles said. "What are they going to do?"

About 1,500 people attended Morgan's funeral Friday, and about 50 gathered Wednesday night at a candlelight vigil at the Bayview community center. A big memorial of stuffed animals, candles, flowers and balloons rested against a light pole in front of the center -- placed there in Morgan's honor.

Struggling to keep their candles lit in a breeze, the crowd prayed, sang and carried signs reading "Stop the Violence" and "Change the Future of Youth."

Denae Thompson, 16, said Morgan was her cousin and that she misses her terribly. She said kids in the neighborhood are bored and need more recreational opportunities and youth centers.

"If there were more things to do, a whole lot more kids would be off the streets," she said.

Tom Hendricks, a Bayview resident and a member of ACORN, an advocacy group that organized the vigil, demanded more resources and attention from City Hall.

"We live in San Francisco -- one of the most progressive big cities in the United States," he said. "But when you bring up Bayview, it's treated as the ugly stepchild."

He said now that the neighborhood is at the center of the city's redevelopment efforts to keep the 49ers, it's the perfect time to call for more youth programs, vocational education programs and job training.

Miles addressed the crowd and thanked them for their love and support. She also thanked whoever helped make Wednesday's arrests possible.

"Our family wants justice for Antwanisha," she said. "Whatever you did to help make that happen, thank you so much."

E-mail the writers at mlagos@sfchronicle.com and jcote@sfchronicle.com.
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