Which is better: Lamb Lies Down On Broadway or The Wall? - Page 2 - U2 Feedback

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Old 01-12-2007, 05:01 PM   #16
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Originally posted by GibsonGirl


But back on topic. I don't like Peter Gabriel, so my opinion is biased.
Why?

Well what do you think of the album musically?
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Old 01-12-2007, 05:06 PM   #17
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Originally posted by GibsonGirl

That song's pretty avant-garde.
I hear that if you slow down the LP during this track, in one channel you can hear Gilmour say exactly that!
No love for Momentary? Signs of Life and Terminal Frost at least are excellent.
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Old 01-12-2007, 05:23 PM   #18
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Both are about eccentric, rebellious young men struggling to find their identity in a world that attempts to push conformity upon them at every turn. Only Quadrophenia concerns a Brighton Mod, and Lamb concerns a New York street punk. I must admit that my understanding of Lamb is superficial compared to Quadrophenia, so if anyone would like to critique this, I would be interested to hear it.
The difference is that while the conflicts in Quadrophenia are a result of outside forces, Lamb's conflicts are the direct result of internal faults. The mods are a culture while Rael is a single person. The story are complete opposites. The two albums have the same starting point but they go off in completely different directions.
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Old 01-12-2007, 05:45 PM   #19
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The difference is that while the conflicts in Quadrophenia are a result of outside forces, Lamb's conflicts are the direct result of internal faults.
Well, Jimmy's conflict in Quadrophenia, is, as suggested by the title, a battle between the four sides of his personality; hence Quadrophenia. I suppose it is an internal struggle as a reaction to outside forces, which eventually leads to his suicide crisis on "The Rock."
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Old 01-12-2007, 05:49 PM   #20
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Originally posted by Screwtape2


Why?

Well what do you think of the album musically?
I don't know, there has just always been something about him that I've never warmed up to. There's something about Genesis in general that I've never warmed up to. I've tried to give the band a chance, but they're just not my style. And to be honest, the last time I heard anything from The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway must have been almost five years ago when my father had it on in the car. I found it boring.

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Originally posted by cdisantis83

I hear that if you slow down the LP during this track, in one channel you can hear Gilmour say exactly that!
No love for Momentary? Signs of Life and Terminal Frost at least are excellent.
That's why I included the quote.
And no, I find Signs Of Life to be a bit dull. I think the whole ethereal, spacy instrumental album intro is done better on a song like Cluster One. The 80s production on Terminal Frost makes me want to curl into the fetal position and cry.
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Old 01-12-2007, 06:18 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally posted by GibsonGirl


I don't know, there has just always been something about him that I've never warmed up to. There's something about Genesis in general that I've never warmed up to. I've tried to give the band a chance, but they're just not my style. And to be honest, the last time I heard anything from The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway must have been almost five years ago when my father had it on in the car. I found it boring.
Ironically, my dad played it for me in the car a couple years ago and I too found it boring. You should give it another try sometime. I did and gained a real appreciation for it. Maybe since you're older you'll be able to warm up to the band's music. Try listening to Nursery Cryme and Selling England By The Pound.

P.S. Don't form any opinion of Genesis from the Phil Collins-era. The band ceased to exist post Gabriel.
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Old 01-12-2007, 07:52 PM   #22
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Originally posted by LemonMacPhisto


A Momentary Lapse of Reason is my least favorite.

Sure it has Sorrow, but what else?

Nothing.

The Wall is poetry in motion.
AMLOR isn't that good either, but it has Learning To Fly and On The Turning Away, and Sorrow is absolutely godly and could redeem just about anything. AMLOR is at least better than The Final Dreary Cut and The Wall. I really, really hate The Wall. I have never been able to get through one disc of it, let alone the whole thing. I've tried, I think I did actually once force myself to finish the first disc or at least got bloody close, but I just couldn't keep going. It's the most boring album I've heard in my life. It's a shame, as the concept has great potential, but it just goes to prove a good concept is nothing without good execution. (Hey, Pain Of Salvation, are you listening?)

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Atom Heart Mother is not terribly strong either. I read an interview with Waters once where he said that, even if offered 1 million pounds, he would not play the AHM suite on his tour.
I'm not all too interested in the AHM Suite, and Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast is little more than a curiosity, but the middle three songs are amazing. I honestly think Summer '68 is the best song the Floyd have ever done. Sure, Sorrow has better guitar and some of the best lyrics ever written, but Summer '68 is absolutely beautiful.
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Old 01-12-2007, 07:54 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally posted by Axver


AMLOR isn't that good either, but it has Learning To Fly and On The Turning Away, and Sorrow is absolutely godly and could redeem just about anything. AMLOR is at least better than The Final Dreary Cut and The Wall. I really, really hate The Wall. I have never been able to get through one disc of it, let alone the whole thing. I've tried, I think I did actually once force myself to finish the first disc or at least got bloody close, but I just couldn't keep going. It's the most boring album I've heard in my life. It's a shame, as the concept has great potential, but it just goes to prove a good concept is nothing without good execution. (Hey, Pain Of Salvation, are you listening?)
Have you seen the movie?

I got a new appreciation for the album after watching it. I kind of understood it better.

The Wall ranks behind Dark Side, Animals, and Wish You Were Here as the best Pink Floyd album for me.

Learning to Fly is a cheesefest, On the Turning Away is good though.
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Old 01-12-2007, 08:04 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by Axver


AMLOR is at least better than The Final Dreary Cut
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Old 01-12-2007, 08:50 PM   #25
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Hands down, and you knew I'd say this Screwtape, I Lamb Lies Down On Broadway. I can't even pick one song to quote a lyric too. I just wish I had been old enough to know of the band to have seen this performed live. I saw the next best thing a few years ago: Musical Box. PM me if you need details

It is here... it is now...
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Old 01-12-2007, 11:10 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally posted by Axver

I honestly think Summer '68 is the best song the Floyd have ever done.
I would never expect someone to choose this as Floyd's best song, but I am glad that Rick Wright's songwriting gets some appreciation.

I would also have to add that The Final Cut is an incredible achievement, if it is given repeated listens. It is probably the preeminent example of a "difficult" album that I have ever come across, but, if afforded time, the power of the album is striking.
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Old 01-12-2007, 11:12 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally posted by cdisantis83



I would also have to add that The Final Cut is an incredible achievement, if it is given repeated listens. It is probably the preeminent example of a "difficult" album that I have ever come across, but, if afforded time, the power of the album is striking.
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Old 01-13-2007, 12:06 AM   #28
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OK, I just listened to The Lamb Lies Down. While it hasn't suddenly become my favourite piece of music ever, it's an excellent piece of work, especially the first half, and it walks all over The Wall and drags it unceremoniously through the mud. Genesis for the win by knock-out!

Quote:
Originally posted by LemonMacPhisto
Have you seen the movie?

I got a new appreciation for the album after watching it. I kind of understood it better.
No, I haven't. My stepfather actually has a copy of the movie but I never got around to watching it and now that I've moved out and live in a different city, I guess I'll just have to track down a copy somewhere else.

Quote:
Originally posted by GibsonGirl
Gilmour-led Floyd > Waters-led Floyd.

Hehe, sorry, I couldn't resist. Waters still ranks highly in my books because of everything he did pre-Wall. I feel Gilmour's post-WYWH output far trumps Waters' post-WYWH output, though.

Quote:
Originally posted by cdisantis83
I would never expect someone to choose this as Floyd's best song, but I am glad that Rick Wright's songwriting gets some appreciation.
Actually, I'm not the only person on Interference to hold that opinion. Liamcool is the one who initially put me onto Summer '68, when I was very firm in my "Sorrow is the best Pink Floyd song ever" stance. But my resolve has steadily been weakened, and about 1-2 weeks ago, I realised that Summer '68 has taken over from Sorrow as my favourite. It's such a gem of a song and I wish it got more attention.

Quote:
I would also have to add that The Final Cut is an incredible achievement, if it is given repeated listens. It is probably the preeminent example of a "difficult" album that I have ever come across, but, if afforded time, the power of the album is striking.
It's funny, the opposite happened to me. I liked it when I first heard it, but on every listen, my opinion of it has declined to the point that it now bores me. It's still better than The Wall, though.
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Old 01-13-2007, 02:27 AM   #29
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The Wall is arguably the most fluid and well written rock opera of all time. It really is quite ingenious. The problem is that most of the songs aren't up to the quality of the albums the band released before it.

LLDOB is very good, but it's not Genesis's best album (Selling England By The Pound FTW!), though it is enjoyable. The story is too bizarre and convoluted to top the Wall's, but musically it is very strong.

I'll give this one to the Wall, but not by much.
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Old 01-13-2007, 01:02 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally posted by Axver
Let me put it this way: I just got The Lamb Lies Down and haven't had a chance to actually play it yet, but I already know it's better than The Wall.
And let me put it this way: I don't even have The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway and have never ever heard something from it, but I have a very strong feeling it's better than The Wall.

Quote:
I really hate The Wall. I think it's PF's worst album by a mile. It should be marketed as an insomnia cure; the only songs that do not bore me to tears are Comfortably Numb and Hey You.
While I won't go as far as to say that I hate it, I do think it's an extremely overrated record. What it's lacking is songs. Yes, I know it's a double album and that it has 26 tracks, but how many songs does it have? And I have no problem in saying that -especially with concept albums- there might be some tracks that are not full songs, but contribute to the narration. Still, I feel The Wall is extremely short on songs. Quoting Hey You or Comfortably Numb (or Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2) is of no effect. I know those are great songs. But tracks like Vera, Bring The Boys Back Home, The Happiest Day Of Our Lives, etc. are just fodder. And Don't Leave Me Now (I think it's that one, I mean the one with Roger Waters singing) is excruciating.
The sad thing of this all is, apart from the fact that there are some great songs on it, that it sounds amazing. I got this album based on opinions in an audiophile forum. I even went the extra mile to find one of the best-sounding versions (luckily it didn't cost me an arm and a leg). I think I'm gonna give it a spin again soon and I know I'll turn the volume knob up high, way high. If only the contents matched the sound quality.

So... erm... yes... The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway for me.
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