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Old 07-11-2006, 06:50 PM   #46
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che é vostro squadra amico

I heard Real - > Cannav. and Buffor , or Buffon for Barcelona

And about the brazilians , the info I have is

Solo Cafu acetta giocar Serie B .....
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Old 07-11-2006, 06:52 PM   #47
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I think italian is such a beautiful language! I have to learn it someday... Sorry about the off topic
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Old 07-11-2006, 06:56 PM   #48
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have the results of the match fixing trail been announced yet ?

update meee
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Old 07-11-2006, 07:16 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally posted by annie_vox
I think italian is such a beautiful language! I have to learn it someday... Sorry about the off topic
I think the italians are such beautiful ladies And so are the portuguese ones .... oh dear ... Without mention that lovely adorabelissima dance they do
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Old 07-11-2006, 07:24 PM   #50
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I liked this article...

*********************************************

The French Hero who was, ultimately, just a Man.

BY BERNARD-HENRI LEVY

PARIS--Here is one of the greatest players of all time, a legend, a myth for the entire planet, and universally acclaimed. Here is a champion who, in front of two billion people, was putting the final touches on one of the most extraordinary sagas in soccer's history.

Here is a man of providence, a savior, who was sought out, like Achilles in his tent of grudge and rage, because he was believed to be the only one who could avert his countrymen's fated decline. Better yet, he's a super-Achilles who--unlike Homer's--did not wait for an Agamemnon (in the guise of coach Raymond Domenech) to come begging him to re-enlist; rather, he decided himself, spontaneously, after having "heard" a voice calling him, to come back from his Spanish exile and--putting his luminous armor back on, and flanked by his faithful Myrmidons (Makelele, Vieira, Thuram)--reverse the new Achaeans' ill fortune and allow them to successfully pull together.

And then this valiant knight who is a hair's breadth from victory and just minutes from the end of a historic match (and of a career that will carry him into the Pantheon of stadium-gods after Pelé, Platini and Maradona); this giant who, like the Titans of the ancient world, has known Glory, then Exile, then Return and Redemption; this redeemer, this blue angel dressed in white, who had only the very last steps to scale to enter Olympus for good, commits a crazy incomprehensible act that amounts to disqualification from the soccer ritual--the final image of him that will go down in history and, in lieu of apotheosis, will cast him into hell.

No one knows, as I write, what actually happened on the field of Berlin's Olympic Stadium.

No one knows what the Italian, Marco Materazzi, did or said (in the 111th minute of a match that this hero had dominated with all his grace) to reawaken in him those old demons of a kid from the streets of Marseilles, the very demons that soccer's code of honor, its ethic, its aesthetic, are made to quell.

Even if we knew why; even if we knew for certain that the Italian insulted him, or cursed his mother, father, brothers, sister; even if we got hold of the black box of those 20 seconds that saw the champion destroy in a flash his legend that is a mix of secret king, a Dostoyevskian sweet man, the ideal Beur son-in-law, future mayor of Marseilles and, last but not least, the charismatic captain leading his troops to consecration; even if we knew the whole story, this suicide would be as all ordinary suicides are; no reason in the world explains the desperate act of a man--no provocation, no nasty remark, will ever tell us why the planetary icon that Zinedine Zidane had become, a man more admired than the Pope, the Dalai Lama and Nelson Mandela put together, a demigod, a chosen one, this great priest-by-consensus of the new religion and the new empire in the making, chose to explode right there, rather than wait a few minutes to settle the quarrel on the sidelines.

No. The truth is that it is perhaps not so easy to stay in the skin of an icon, demigod, hero, legend.

The only plausible explanation for so bizarrely scuttling everything--which, remember, let a lot of time go by (the 20 long seconds following the Italian Machiavelli's undoubtedly calculated outrage) in order to concentrate itself into the outburst of a player who was out of breath and stupidly losing control of his nerves--the only explanation is that there was in this man a kind of recoil, an ultimate inner revolt, against the living parabola, the stupid statue, the beatified monument, that the era had transformed him into over these past few months.

The man's insurrection against the saint. A refusal of the halo that had been put on his head and that he then, quite logically, pulverized with a head-butt, as though saying: I am a living being not a fetish; a man of flesh and blood and passion, not this idiotic empty hologram, this guru, this universal psychoanalyst, natural child of Abbé Pierre and Sister Emanuelle, which soccer-mania was trying to turn me into.

It was as though he were repeating, in parody, the title of one of the very great books of the last century, before the triumph of this liturgy of the body, performance and commodity: Ecce Homo, This is a Man. Yes, a man, a true man, not one of these absurd monsters or synthetic stars who are made by the money of brand names in combination with the sighs of the globalized crowd.

Achilles had his heel. Zidane will have had his--this magnificent and rebellious head that brought him, suddenly, back into the ranks of his human brothers.

(Mr. Lévy is the author of "American Vertigo" (Random House, 2006). This piece was translated from the original French by Hélène Brenkman.)
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Old 07-11-2006, 07:32 PM   #51
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avrebbero means "will have"

yeah I think a lot of teams will ask for Buffon in the near future...
I guess we'll have to wait for the trial to finish, I have no idea how long it will take... it's been a month already
I'm a fan of Milan, so it'll be sad for me to see them back in serie B... and I'll be sadder if Gattuso and Pirlo will leave because I love them both... but I also want a clean soccer, so I won't complain too much

annnnd... thank you for the compliment J_NP
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Old 07-11-2006, 07:32 PM   #52
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^^ The article is very good indeed... In the end it's all about the human nature that makes us do unexpected things that we never thought we could do. The same nature that makes our idols do things that we never thought they could do. But all can be forgiven if we just remember that they're like any of us after all... I like the sound of the human hero who has some weakness, but is still a hero. That's what makes us believe that one day we can be a hero too, or maybe we already are for someone.

Quote:
Originally posted by J_NP


I think the italians are such beautiful ladies And so are the portuguese ones .... oh dear ... Without mention that lovely adorabelissima dance they do
I guess it's all about the latin blood
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Old 07-11-2006, 07:41 PM   #53
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great article
it's even got some Latin in it... ECCE HOMO
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Old 07-11-2006, 07:43 PM   #54
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Yes Indeed and let's not forget again , Zidane wasn't the 1st or last one , we have to remember Garrincha , Maradona and even Pele lost it once . Though Maradona was more than once ......

E la cosa bizarra é la falta dellos classicos , non avra Milan X Inter o Milan X Juve , chesto é terribile per calcio
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Old 07-11-2006, 08:00 PM   #55
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I dont know if this was put before here but anyway .....

who understand german , check this

http://www.spiegel.de/sport/fussball...426180,00.html

In a nutshell , the most respected german magazine Der Spiegel , is sayin that according to same Article 55 NtalWar reminded , If there was indeed a racist insult , Italy can lose the game .... therefore :

The TITLE

Though to me this wont go anywhere , dont think Fifa would be able to do somethin that drastic

Through goog translat

Free of doubts if the wording of its offense is proven to the 32-Jährigen, hard consequences possibly threaten it and its team. Only in March this yearly decided the Fifa to a conference new punishments against racism. In the article 55, paragraph 4 of the Fifa Disciplines is called it: “Behavior player, official one of federations or clubs as well as spectators in any form discriminating against or contempting for human beings in accordance with exp. 1 and/or 2 of this article, then become the crew concerned, if zuordbar, with a first passing automatically three points taken off. (...) In plays without point assignment the appropriate crew becomes disqualified ”
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Old 07-11-2006, 08:36 PM   #56
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To German fans here (yeah the 2-3 of you!), what do you think of Klinsmann leaving the team?

I for one, hope they continue with the attractive attacking style they started. Also, if he takes that U.S. job, more than a few people are going to be furious.

All you German-bashers.....move along....nothing to see here.
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Old 07-11-2006, 08:42 PM   #57
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Seems google improved its translation software. The first time a translated text is understandable.

In the next paragraph the article says if there is clear evidence of what Materazzi said, the Fifa could disqualify the Italian team, if they interpretate the article 55 that way.
So many "ifs" and I think the Fifa will think about the decision verly hard and thinkabout what a disqualification would mean.
At the moment it's only theory and the Fifa doesn't investigate.
As long as there are so many lipreaders, and everybody reads something different it would be pointless to investigate since there is no clear evidence.

Of course the Fifa is able to take the title, but I think the disadvantages of such an action are greater than the advantages.


It's sad, of course, That Klinsmann leaves the team.
But for him it's probably the best way.
You know how disrespectful many people, officials and average people, talked about him and his methods after every game we lost. The same people now wanted him to stay and said only the best of him, like Mayer-Vorfelder or Beckenbauer, or they just shut up, like Hoeneß.
And he knows that when he e.g. loses against Ireland or isn't successful at the EM people just will go 180° and bash him again.

So I think for him it's the best time to leave.
But I hope the German team will go on playing like that and the next coach, maybe Löw, will stay en route and be as wilfully as Klinsmann whenever the DFB or someone else tries to make the decisions again.
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Old 07-11-2006, 08:54 PM   #58
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That's exactly what I was thinking. The press and DFB can turn against him in a second and don't even get me started on Beckenbauer. I think Löw can go on with the same style. Hope to catch a match atleast in 2008.

As for the Italy game, I don't think Fifa will go through a drastic measure like that, but there better be suspensions.
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Old 07-11-2006, 08:55 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally posted by Vincent Vega
Seems google improved its translation software. The first time a translated text is understandable.
Though I put my hand in some words
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Old 07-11-2006, 09:08 PM   #60
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Ok, that explains alot

Good work.
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