teenagers - Page 3 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Lemonade Stand > Lemonade Stand Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-08-2006, 11:49 AM   #31
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
angelordevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Inside a sound
Posts: 5,827
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by MooMoo!
oh, erm with regards to teenagers and kids these days, i think its safe to say kids have always been unruly and hard to control, but in this day and age, kids are growing up to fast. they seem to forget childhood completely, and are missing out the innocent part of their life. its a shame, because if things keep going the way they are, id hate to bring my kids up (if i ever have any) in this sort of environment. i see it in school, not even like rumours, but people openly disscusing who slept with who, and people taking drugs downtown at lunchtime. i know for fact at least 2 people in my year have been, or are pregnant.

its gone too far.
Just reading back at a few other posts, I have to say that I think it all starts at home. It’s too easy to blame society, when many of these attitudes are fostered in our homes and only later hit the street and become "the norm." I’m not in kid-mode at the moment, though one day I’d like to have kids. What I’d tell them is that life is a rush of craziness, chaos, and beauty, and it’s important to have a kind of moral compass to sift through it all. I’ve often found myself cringing in the company of some of my friends’ parents and relatives. Some of the attitudes about women, other races, other countries, and other people, in general, are scary. These are attitudes that repeat themselves, unless there’s a way for kids to leave the ignorance of the last generation behind.

love_u2_adam, you seem to have a good head on your shoulders for your age. If you take pride in your originality, great things (and great friends), will follow.
__________________

__________________
angelordevil is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 02:26 PM   #32
Blue Crack Addict
 
love_u2_adam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Heaven In Alberta, Where We Got All Hell For A Basement..
Posts: 22,307
Local Time: 07:03 AM
^THANKS!
__________________

__________________
love_u2_adam is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 03:50 PM   #33
Blue Crack Addict
 
nbcrusader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Southern California
Posts: 22,071
Local Time: 05:03 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by LivLuvAndBootlegMusic


This is an issue with bad parenting, not "bad teens" in general. If parents spend thousands of dollars so a friggin 10 year old can have his own PC and unmonitored access to the web, that's a different issue altogether.
Even beyond providing the tools, parents must teach them how to self-regulate behavior.
__________________
nbcrusader is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 04:29 PM   #34
Blue Crack Addict
 
love_u2_adam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Heaven In Alberta, Where We Got All Hell For A Basement..
Posts: 22,307
Local Time: 07:03 AM
ya parents have to say you cant do this and u can do that!
__________________
love_u2_adam is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 06:34 PM   #35
War Child
 
joerags's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: What time is it in the world?
Posts: 742
Local Time: 01:03 PM
It's all about being cool. When you're a teenager, you have to deal with peer pressure constantly. You want people to like you and think you are cool. It's not about being yourself. I was a closest U2 fan when I was a teenager, and I bet there are many teenagers today who are closet U2 fans. For 25 years, U2 has never been cool to teenagers.
Anyway..
It's all about being rebellious and doing whatever you want and disrespecting your parents. Hating your parents and disobeying them is a given when you a teenager.
If you're not smoking, doing drugs or having sex, you are a LOSER!!!
Why do you think teenage suicides are so high? Hell, when I was a teenager, I always thought about suicide. I still do. But when I was a teenager, it was so hard to be cool and think people are cool. Teenagers have to deal with this EVERY SINGLE DAY. So today, they have to like rap music, crappy pop/punk rock music, because it is so OMG cool.
Even the nerdy teenagers like me had to deal with pressure to get good grades.
A good movie to see is The Breakfast Club. That movie is so timeless. You can play that movie 50 years from now and teenagers could relate to it.
__________________
joerags is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 06:40 PM   #36
Blue Crack Addict
 
love_u2_adam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Heaven In Alberta, Where We Got All Hell For A Basement..
Posts: 22,307
Local Time: 07:03 AM
^its true today to, no one thinks im cool cause im in love with u2 but i dont care
__________________
love_u2_adam is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 07:16 PM   #37
Blue Crack Overdose
Get me off the internetz!
 
Carek1230's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: wishing I was somewhere else....
Posts: 114,606
Local Time: 05:03 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by angelordevil


Just reading back at a few other posts, I have to say that I think it all starts at home. It’s too easy to blame society, when many of these attitudes are fostered in our homes and only later hit the street and become "the norm." I’m not in kid-mode at the moment, though one day I’d like to have kids. What I’d tell them is that life is a rush of craziness, chaos, and beauty, and it’s important to have a kind of moral compass to sift through it all. I’ve often found myself cringing in the company of some of my friends’ parents and relatives. Some of the attitudes about women, other races, other countries, and other people, in general, are scary. These are attitudes that repeat themselves, unless there’s a way for kids to leave the ignorance of the last generation behind.

love_u2_adam, you seem to have a good head on your shoulders for your age. If you take pride in your originality, great things (and great friends), will follow.

I disagree tho not entirely. and I do so with firsthand knowledge and experience. I was a single parent, struggling to raise my son who is soon to turn 20 (on Bono's b'day). It was hard working FT plus keeping a watchful eye on him. I tried keeping him in extra curricular activities and going out of my way driving him all over town to have a decent social life with the kids he was friends with. He was a GATE student but all that went to the wayside in high school when peer pressure got the best of my son along with others. My son got into drugs and stealing from me, he turned evil and would throw things, push me around, curse me. I would call his father for help and he didn't know what to do. He insisted on buying the child a car when he began to drive which I was against and that is when everything really went to hell. My son's grades plummeted and he started cutting school, sneaking out of the house and having friends sneaking in. There was no trust. It was a living nightmare. I had a sign posted on the wall that said "Check Out Time: 18 Years". I couldn't wait until his 18th birthday. I called police many times for many reasons but my son and his friends were one step above the law every time. I tried counseling but my son walked out. I continued counseling to save my own sanity. One day my son decided he didn't need high school anymore, it was stupid and boring he said, so he chose to home school himself at an independent program in the school district. He went thru the motions and got his high school diploma and even walked with his class at graduation. 2 weeks before his 18th birthday he decided to move out since I'd lost my child support and could no longer afford where I lived. Altho I was moving to a cheaper 2 bedroom place he chose not to move with me. He did ok on his own and has never moved back home. He started college and is doing alright, now in his 2nd year. He has cleaned up his act although he parties too much. He could get better grades but he doesn't apply and challenge himself. He is working and his dad is helping him financially. He just bought a new car. I am one of the lucky ones that things seem to have worked out and my son wasn't one of those with burnt brain cells or one of the ones found in the gutter or in an auto accident. I believe PEER PRESSURE these days is the worst "drug" out there in the teen world, and teens are SO critical and MEAN to one another. I would NOT want to be a teen ager today. It is survival of the fittest, and a fight to be popular or find yourself a niche to fit into.

The best thing of all with my son and I now is that he is always telling me he loves me and apologizing for things he did that hurt me. It was a rough road and I wouldn't wish those times upon my worst enemy.

Any parents out there going through this or those with kids not yet in the teens.....good luck. Be tough, keep your sanity, and if there are two parents in the household, stick together as a team. Also remember there are all kinds of resources out there in communities, churches, schools, etc. to get help when you feel you need it. You are not alone.

To the young people here on Interference I commend you as you seem to be quite mature and respectful with values. Music has a great deal to do along with society with teens choosing how they want to act and who they think they want to be, and in my opinion the teens who are U2 fans are classy kids. My son, thank goodness, is slowly becoming a U2 fan. I only wish he would have done this much earlier, as I do feel it could have been a big difference in a very positive way in the interaction between he and I.
__________________
Carek1230 is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 08:01 PM   #38
Blue Crack Addict
 
love_u2_adam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Heaven In Alberta, Where We Got All Hell For A Basement..
Posts: 22,307
Local Time: 07:03 AM
WOW^
__________________
love_u2_adam is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 08:08 PM   #39
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
trevster2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 4,330
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Thanks for sharing that Carek,
__________________
trevster2k is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 08:25 PM   #40
Blue Crack Overdose
Get me off the internetz!
 
Carek1230's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: wishing I was somewhere else....
Posts: 114,606
Local Time: 05:03 AM
It's been a rough road, but I am so glad I survived it. I am so glad that slowly my son is growing up and maturing and realizing the things he did to hurt me....not only that he has come up with some interesting things about teen agers today. He feels they are mean and tougher than any other generation ever was and that it is because of MTV.....too much sex and violence on television and in music. And he tells scary stories about the peer pressure he fought, things that went on in his high school....drug deals and sex in the restrooms and all over campus, how students stayed a step ahead of cops....places where they partied and what they would do when they cut school. What really scares me is what some of the kids did to raise money for drugs and the available drugs that are out there. Seriously there should be a course on peer pressure and it should be taught in grammar or elementary school!
__________________
Carek1230 is offline  
Old 01-08-2006, 09:38 PM   #41
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
angelordevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Inside a sound
Posts: 5,827
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Carek1230
It's been a rough road, but I am so glad I survived it. I am so glad that slowly my son is growing up and maturing and realizing the things he did to hurt me....not only that he has come up with some interesting things about teen agers today. He feels they are mean and tougher than any other generation ever was and that it is because of MTV..


You should be very proud of yourself. It’s difficult to be a single parent. I’ve seen this firsthand, as I grew up without a father around. In many ways, I think I actually benefited from the environment my mother created, but I sometimes wonder what it would’ve been like to have a guy in the house to look up to.

In terms of peer pressure, it certainly was there. Not so much drugs, but definitely drinking, etc. Outside of my mother, who was often busy at work, I was lucky to have my grandparents around me. They lived just down the street, and that proximity probably kept me from doing too many stupid things.

I completely agree that it’s probably more challenging to raise a child these days, with the overwhelming amount of violence depicted in the media, the easy access to drugs, and the overall lack of hope that many of them feel. We need better role models, better leaders, and as a product of a single parent family, I have to say, we need better men.
__________________
angelordevil is offline  
Old 01-09-2006, 12:15 AM   #42
Refugee
 
MacHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Londinium
Posts: 1,279
Local Time: 01:03 AM
When I was a teen the main thing my parents razzed me about was "you teenagers think you know everything, but you don't know diddly-squat", which I think is true in many cases .

As I got older, about 16-18, I realized what prats teens can be (not all, but a significant portion!)
__________________
MacHat is offline  
Old 01-09-2006, 12:44 AM   #43
Blue Crack Addict
 
Liesje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the dog house
Posts: 19,557
Local Time: 08:03 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by nbcrusader


Even beyond providing the tools, parents must teach them how to self-regulate behavior.
I believe parents can achieve this simply by setting an example. It only works in some cases, since every child is different, but take me for an example - I've never had a curfew, I've never had set "chores", I've never not been allowed to do this or that...no rules, none. Here's the flip side - my parents stopped giving me money when I got my first job at age 14, I've never had access to a car so "doing whatever I wanted" meant I had to figure out how to do it and how I could afford it. Staying out until 4am meant I was on my own trying to drag myself out of bed for work/school/gymnastics the next morning. During middle school and high school I got good grades, had friends who could have a good time without all the bf/gf drama, didn't party or drink, no sex....and never once did I have a single rule imposed on me by my parents. I learned by watching their hard work and sacrifices how to make intelligent, responsible choices. I knew they would never bail me out and that once I turned 17 and left for college, I was on my own forever and better know how to deal. I wouldn't really say I was close to my parents, but we never fought and I was never punished. Making a bad choice and letting them down would've been punishment enough.
__________________
Liesje is offline  
Old 01-09-2006, 01:18 AM   #44
Blue Crack Overdose
Get me off the internetz!
 
Carek1230's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: wishing I was somewhere else....
Posts: 114,606
Local Time: 05:03 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by angelordevil




You should be very proud of yourself. It’s difficult to be a single parent. I’ve seen this firsthand, as I grew up without a father around. In many ways, I think I actually benefited from the environment my mother created, but I sometimes wonder what it would’ve been like to have a guy in the house to look up to.

In terms of peer pressure, it certainly was there. Not so much drugs, but definitely drinking, etc. Outside of my mother, who was often busy at work, I was lucky to have my grandparents around me. They lived just down the street, and that proximity probably kept me from doing too many stupid things.

I completely agree that it’s probably more challenging to raise a child these days, with the overwhelming amount of violence depicted in the media, the easy access to drugs, and the overall lack of hope that many of them feel. We need better role models, better leaders, and as a product of a single parent family, I have to say, we need better men.

Thank you, so much for your post. This proves that some single parent homes CAN raise decent young people and CAN set values and guidelines for their children. I have had so many people tell me that raising a child as a single parent is the most challenging role in our lives, and that one day we would reap the rewards. I see this happening in posts such as this and each time my son saws something so mature or apologizes for something dumb he did or said. Makes a lot of the struggle seem so worth it.

How lucky you were to have your grandparents. I moved from No. Calif. to So. California to be near family, two older male cousins who had promised to be there to help and be the mail influence in my son's life. They weren;t there. I think one cousin took my son to a baseball game and spent the entire $60 I'd given them for the outing, and the other cousin did nothing but complain about how horrifying it was to hear the way my son talked back to me (and HE was a cop). I don't think the male influence always is the answer.
__________________
Carek1230 is offline  
Old 01-09-2006, 03:25 PM   #45
The Fly
 
larryslass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 104
Local Time: 01:03 PM
I also think you should be proud of yourself. Raising kids is one of the hardest jobs there is especially as a single parent in todays society. Glad to hear you both seem ok now. My son turns 13 tomorrow and i'm dreading it in a lot of ways. He's already starting the attitude!!!
__________________

__________________
larryslass is offline  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com