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Old 03-21-2003, 09:29 AM   #16
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I am a huge fan of the bard. My favouite play is King Lear, by far, hands down. Evil sisters, tragedy, filial obligation, lies, trechery, deceit, a fool, madness....

"Who can tell me who I am." (1.4.238)

"I am a man more sinned against than sinning." (3.2.59-60)

"As flies to wanton boys so are we to the gods/They kill us for their sport" (4.1.37)

There is something so delightfully and morosely appealing about Shaekspearean tragedy. Like an accident you can't take your eyes off of, you have to keep reading it.

I highly reccomend the film adaptation of Titus Andronicus (starring Anthony Hopkins) for any Shakespeare fans out there.
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Old 03-21-2003, 10:30 AM   #17
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Have any of you seen this Aussie (I think) theatre group that does all of 'speare's plays in 90 minutes? They came down last year but I'm not familiar with all his works so I didn't go.
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Old 03-21-2003, 12:33 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally posted by The_Sweetest_Thing
I am a huge fan of the bard. My favouite play is King Lear, by far, hands down. Evil sisters, tragedy, filial obligation, lies, trechery, deceit, a fool, madness....

"Who can tell me who I am." (1.4.238)

"I am a man more sinned against than sinning." (3.2.59-60)

"As flies to wanton boys so are we to the gods/They kill us for their sport" (4.1.37)

I love Lear. It's one of the few plays that every single one of my Lit professor's insisted upon teaching.

I love any play that has a fool in it. The fool is there to represent atttibutes that the main character lacks. I find the plays with fools, soothsayers, court jesters, to be a bit more entertaining.
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Old 03-21-2003, 01:17 PM   #19
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Shakespear, what a great guy.... for me to poop on.
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Old 03-21-2003, 02:15 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by Triumph
Shakespear, what a great guy.... for me to poop on.
I don't get it. Nor do I 'get' your sig, for that matter.

arw, I agree. While there for comic releif, the fools are often the wisest characters there. Have you read I Henry IV or the Merry Wives of Windsor? While not a fool, Falstaff is pretty hilarious..

...btw, did you know that Cordelia (in Lear) is actually the Fool? Or is, at least by some interpretations?

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action. - Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember'd.
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Old 03-21-2003, 02:38 PM   #21
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http://quizilla.com/users/campgeek/q...20Are%20You%3F
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Old 03-21-2003, 03:15 PM   #22
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Old 03-21-2003, 03:20 PM   #23
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another lover of the bard..I'll get back to you with THE quote

I just wanted to say that I recently watched a working of Twelfth Night. It was filmed in Cornwall. I enjoyed it( Ben Kingsley and Sir Humphrey, bravo) I also got some very good garden design ideas from it. I am thinking of a mosaic wall and statue....who should the statue be of? Shakespeare? Venus? Bono?


to Bono or not to Bono



that is the question.
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Old 03-21-2003, 03:27 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by The_Sweetest_Thing


arw, I agree. While there for comic releif, the fools are often the wisest characters there. Have you read I Henry IV or the Merry Wives of Windsor? While not a fool, Falstaff is pretty hilarious..
I loved Falstaff. Poor drunkard. "There lives not three good men unhanged in England, and one of them is fat and grows old."

"If sack and sugar be a fault, God help the wicked! If to be
old and merry be a sin, then many an old host that I know is
damned."

"I am bewitched with the rogue’s company. If the rascal have not given me medicines to make me love him, I’ll be hanged. It could not be else, I have drunk medicines. "

Quote:
...btw, did you know that Cordelia (in Lear) is actually the Fool? Or is, at least by some interpretations?
[/B]
No. I've never heard that. I was taught Shakespeare out of the same anthology by 4 different professors so maybe that's why.
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Old 03-21-2003, 03:29 PM   #25
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PS: I love the style of paintings you have posted here.
The fairy one appeared while I was posting...an omen? I don't know what to wear to the wedding today. I think I bought the wrong thing yesterday...a velvet top that looks like a butterfly, and I was thinking of taking one of my veils. I was worried it was a bit OTT ( and I'm a bit old)
On the basis of that pic,I think I've decided....to go OTT or not to go OTT
maybe THAT is THE question?


I know I know.....OUT damned spot!!

OK , I'm going
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Old 03-21-2003, 03:30 PM   #26
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Sonnet 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee
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Old 03-21-2003, 03:33 PM   #27
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..not quite gone yet....
PSS: @ the topic heading
the shadow scene from Dead And Loving It Lesley Neilsen
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Old 03-21-2003, 04:09 PM   #28
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I have Julius Caesar on vinyl lps with Richard Burton. I got it in the 70s when I was a wee lad. It is really good.

My favorite is Hamlet.
I have a 3-4 hour Kenneth Brannah production of the entire play (on audio tape) it is astounding.
When I was having trouble sleeping I would listen to it.

I will have to think of which lines move me most, there are so many.



Yertle, I finally saw a production of ‘Merchant of Venice”
It seemed so anti-semetic, I did not like it. But, yes it is a good speech.
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Old 03-21-2003, 04:16 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally posted by The_Sweetest_Thing


I highly reccomend the film adaptation of Titus Andronicus (starring Anthony Hopkins) for any Shakespeare fans out there.
yes i saw it very good.

i think jane taymore? directed it.

she is a stage director.


also; the film Richard II with Ian McKellan

"A horse, a horse, a kingdom for a horse"

I saw him do this on stage and film
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Old 03-21-2003, 07:43 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally posted by The_Sweetest_Thing
There is something so delightfully and morosely appealing about Shakespearean tragedy. Like an accident you can't take your eyes off of, you have to keep reading it.
None more eloquently has been said. I now look at Shakespeare in a whole new light...
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