Review the last movie you viewed (NO LISTS) III - Page 34 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Lemonade Stand > Lemonade Stand Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-10-2007, 05:36 PM   #496
Blue Crack Addict
 
Lancemc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ba Sing Se
Posts: 17,664
Local Time: 05:34 AM
The Godfather Part III - 8/10

Not the awful mess many people claim it to be, but also not the masterpiece it could have easily been. It's major flaws are quite obvious, but it succeeds on many levels, including some instances where I feel it surpasses Part II. Michael's storyline was brought to conclusion better than I imagined it would have. The Opera section was far too long, and ended perhaps too abruptly, but I thought the final montage and Michael's death was quite poignant (even if the final shot was a bit awkward).

I actually felt like this film explored Michael's psyche better than the second film did, and really give the entire trilogy a surprising sense of symmetry without being merely repetitive, which it always good. However, Vincent's rise to power within the family was almost wholly unbelievable, since he wasn't given nearly enough screen time. A stronger actor probably could have pulled it off though under the same circumstances.

So ultimately, I really enjoyed it. Parts were brilliant, parts with cringe-inducing, but they were few and usually ignorable given the grand scope of the film. And it must be said, Eli Wallach is always a joy to watch. Gotta love him.
__________________

__________________
Lancemc is offline  
Old 12-10-2007, 05:38 PM   #497
Refugee
 
monkeyskin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Sydney
Posts: 1,489
Local Time: 09:34 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by lazarus

MS, I was lucky enough to see Best Years of Our Lives on a huge screen in Los Angeles recently, and it really is an underseen gem. You're right in that synopsis doesn't look very interesting, and yet I found myself very moved by the story and characters. You'd think a film made right after the end of the war would have been a lot more congratulatory, but it's a very penetrating look at what happens when troops come home. Post-traumatic stress disorder isn't something that was new with the Vietnam War, and I'm glad the filmmakers had the courage to show this dark shadow of the Allies' success.
One thing I do get tired of in war or post-war films from any country is flag waving. What this film did so well was juggle patriotism with honest reflection. Even the rousing speach at the dinner party ends on a slightly cynical yet knowing note.

And call me dumb but I spent most of the film thinking how well they were concealing Harold Russell's hands up his sleeves. Imagine my surprise when he took his robe off at the end. I would have loved to have seen his name announced as the Best Supporting Actor winner live on TV.
__________________

__________________
monkeyskin is offline  
Old 12-10-2007, 06:39 PM   #498
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 38,000
Local Time: 01:34 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Lancemc
The Godfather Part III - 8/10

Not the awful mess many people claim it to be, but also not the masterpiece it could have easily been. It's major flaws are quite obvious, but it succeeds on many levels, including some instances where I feel it surpasses Part II. Michael's storyline was brought to conclusion better than I imagined it would have. The Opera section was far too long, and ended perhaps too abruptly, but I thought the final montage and Michael's death was quite poignant (even if the final shot was a bit awkward).

I actually felt like this film explored Michael's psyche better than the second film did, and really give the entire trilogy a surprising sense of symmetry without being merely repetitive, which it always good. However, Vincent's rise to power within the family was almost wholly unbelievable, since he wasn't given nearly enough screen time. A stronger actor probably could have pulled it off though under the same circumstances.

So ultimately, I really enjoyed it. Parts were brilliant, parts with cringe-inducing, but they were few and usually ignorable given the grand scope of the film. And it must be said, Eli Wallach is always a joy to watch. Gotta love him.

Amazing how it's that good in spite of the shortcomings, huh?

Andy Garcia really is a weak spot, though. It was clear they were trying to get someone like a younger DeNiro, but he's not even close. Plus, DeNiro brought a dignity to his characterization of Vito (obviously inspired in part by what Brando did) that Garcia wouldn't be capable of in a million years.

This sounds crazy, but if they were going to go the hothead route, I can actually see Coppola nephew Nicholas Cage doing a better job. He may not have been dignified either, but Cage would have made him more interesting.

I remember after seeing the film the first time that a perfect final shot would have been the door being closed on Michael just as it was on Kay in the first film. Because what they did use was just too eye-rolling for a story of that magnitude. It was obviously a nod to Brando's death scene, but just compare the two and you'll see how Brando just towers over everyone else, ever.
__________________
lazarus is offline  
Old 12-10-2007, 06:44 PM   #499
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 38,000
Local Time: 01:34 AM
Oh yeah, I thought this was a nice little capsule, more forgiving than most critics were:

http://onfilm.chicagoreader.com/movi...DFATHER_PART_3

BTW, I often go to the Chicago Reader's website to get capsule reviews for older films. The reviewers (mainly Dave Kehr until around 1990, and then Jonathan Rosenbaum) can often have overly political reactions, and I've disagreed with them many times, but they're usually well thought-out opinions.

Here's the link to the Brief Review search:

http://onfilm.chicagoreader.com/search/briefs

You can get stuck for a while here looking up stuff because they're such quick reads. You can also go to the main page if you want to see any of Rosebaum's recent longer reviews. Be warned: he was NOT impressed with No Country For Old Men.
__________________
lazarus is offline  
Old 12-10-2007, 09:29 PM   #500
Blue Crack Addict
 
deep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: A far distance down.
Posts: 28,501
Local Time: 01:34 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by joyfulgirl
I'm Not There - very amusing if you're familiar with Dylan's life. Otherwise, it might be a bit confusing to say the least. I found the Richard Gere vignette to be the most head-scratching confusing and boring except for a wonderful Jim James (My Morning Jacket) cameo. The rest of it I really enjoyed. It was fun being on "the inside" of the jokes, knowing these parts of Dylan's life somewhat, and piecing things together. It was unusual and very creative with some great performances. Aside from the obvious performances everyone's talking about, I thought Julianne Moore was particularly great. Definitely not a movie for everyone.
Yeah, I like Richard Gere a lot
but his vignette did not add anything to this film

the part with the kid annoyed me the most
that whole bit was very patronizing
they had the black family almost acting like they were in black face

if this is film a peak inside of Dylan's psyche
he is a bit of a bigot
__________________
deep is offline  
Old 12-10-2007, 10:57 PM   #501
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 38,000
Local Time: 01:34 AM
The Gere scenes are the most abstract of the film, but it captures its respective period very well. After Dylan's motorcycle accident, he disappeared for a while, and while he was physically recuperating from his wounds, it's clear he was also trying to distance himself from the press and the mythology that had been building around him. He wasn't creatively inactive though, recording the Basement Tapes with the members of the Band. While it wasn't officially released until around '75, it still represents musically that period of time in his life. The songs on that album have been analyzed and discussed possibly more than anything else in his discography. The subjects of the songs, and the sound of them seems to come from some kind of pioneer/old west/rural type of place, but they're not very straightforward. It's almost the country version of the cosmopolitan, Rimbaud-inspired fantasies of the '65-'67 period.

You combine this with Dylan's appearance in Sam Peckinpah's film Pat Garret & Billy the Kid, and some other films from the period, most notably Robert Altman's McCabe & Mrs. Miller, and it's clear what the filmmaker was trying to do with the Richard Gere section of the film. It's a bit of a hodgepodge of Americana, with Gere playing "Billy" as a fugitive from sheriff Pat Garrett, who is played by the same actor that is the journalist ("Mr. Jones") in the Cate Blanchett section. So the metaphor here is that "outlaw" Dylan was hiding from the press and the public during these years, and it's represented in this Old West theme.

Also represented to a lesser extent in these scenes are the Western and biblical imagery found on John Wesley Harding, Dylan's first official release after the motorcycle crash, which was followed by the straightforward country of Nashville Skyline.

I think once you know what's going on in these scenes, you can appreciate it a bit more.
__________________
lazarus is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 09:54 AM   #502
Blue Crack Addict
 
joyfulgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 16,615
Local Time: 02:34 AM
Thanks, laz. I did know about the motorcycle accident and the Sam Peckinpah film but I still thought that piece was boring and not particularly effective. What you've said here does fill it out for me a bit, though. Still, I thought it was the weakest segment.

deep, I don't think we're supposed to necessarily like Dylan from these vignettes. We've always known he was a bit of a jerk at times (seems to have mellowed more in later years, though) and to me the point of this collage was that he's an enigma and we're never really going to understand him. I get a bit annoyed by the whole "enigmatic artist" thing in general, not just with Dylan, so that's why sometimes it's best to just listen to the music. But as a film, I quite enjoyed it, even despite its flaws.
__________________
joyfulgirl is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 01:26 PM   #503
Blue Crack Addict
 
verte76's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: hoping for changes
Posts: 23,331
Local Time: 09:34 AM
Darjeeling Limited

This was supposed to be funny. The review in the Birmingham News said it was, and so did my sister. It had Owen Wilson, Adrian Brody, Jason Schwartzman, and Anjelica Huston in it. I didn't get the point of the movie. It's about three brothers on a trip in India. The paper gave it four stars. I'll give it three. I'd recommend it. See if you think it's funny. I didn't think it was. It was more serious. It has a religious theme of sorts.
__________________
verte76 is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 05:51 PM   #504
Sizzlin' Sicilian
Forum Administrator
 
Sicy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 69,297
Local Time: 01:34 AM
Just saw Walk The Line last nite on HBO. 8/10

It was interesting, I didnt know all the background with Johnny Cash and June Carter. The only thing I didnt like is I think they skipped the part where him and Viv got divorced Anyway I was surprised to find out that Johnny & June were married for 35 years or that June actually wrote Ring of Fire. I think Joaquin Phoenix played a really good Johnny Cash, his voice even sounded like him. I'd watch it again.
__________________
Sicy is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 06:24 PM   #505
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 38,000
Local Time: 01:34 AM
You know, for a film that's often regarded as a standard biopic, I thought it was very well done. What was cool is that they didn't try to condense his entire life into the film, and the focus was on the love story. I thought it was far superior to Ray, and though Reese didn't give some kind of tour-de-force performance, she was great and deserved accolades. Phoenix was great, too. Perfect casting there.
__________________
lazarus is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 10:11 PM   #506
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 38,000
Local Time: 01:34 AM
Idlewild (dir. Bryan Barber)

I'm kicking myself for not having seen this in the theatre, especially as a big OutKast fan, but it wasn't around for very long. A real shame, as this shows a hell of a lot more energy than Chicago, and a bit more restraint than Moulin Rouge. Now I'm not going to claim it's quite as creative as Baz Luhrman's film, but Barber is a very talented visualist who gives a lot of pop to the images, and having worked with the band before, knows how to fuse them with the music.

I'm partial to films set in this time period/setting, namely prohibition in some unnamed Southern city. It actually looks a bit like Kansas City, and anyone who's seen Robert Altman's film of that name may find it a little familiar. But the focus isn't on crime and jazz, it's on crime and some weird fusion of jazz/hip-hop/blues/swing. You'd think this anachronistic choice would take you out of the film, but it actually sucks you in.

The lead actors, namely Andre 3000 and Big Boi from OutKast (billed under their real names) aren't seasoned thespians (though Dre has appeared in a couple films already), but they both show a lot of enthusiasm for the project. Big Boi is the cool one, very believable as a hustler and entrepreneur, and Dre is the sensitive dreamer (somewhat against type considering his usual extravagance and eccentricity) who gets a bit more screen time and is more the heart of the film. The supporting cast features a few well known faces like Ving Rhames, Terrence Howard (amazing as always), Ben Vereen, Bill Nunn, and Macy Gray.

The story is a bit generic, so don't go expecting the immersion into the world like Altman's film, or the grand operatics of Coppola's Cotton Club. But the musical numbers punctuate the dramatic moments, and hold it all together, plus Dre is a very charismatic screen presence when he turns it on. It's a fun ride, and one that, sadly, audiences for the most part chose not to take.
__________________
lazarus is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 10:19 PM   #507
Blue Crack Addict
 
Lancemc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ba Sing Se
Posts: 17,664
Local Time: 05:34 AM
Saw about the last 45 minutes of that movie, or maybe the middle 45, I couldn't tell.

It was weird as hell.
__________________
Lancemc is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 10:39 PM   #508
Blue Crack Addict
 
Dalton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Little hand says it's time to rock and roll.
Posts: 15,147
Local Time: 05:34 AM
I'm watching Eastern Promises right now. Blood. Lots of blood.
__________________
Dalton is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 11:28 PM   #509
Blue Crack Supplier
 
lazarus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 38,000
Local Time: 01:34 AM
I didn't notice any blood--too busy watching the swingin' man meat of Viggo Mortensen.
__________________
lazarus is offline  
Old 12-11-2007, 11:38 PM   #510
Blue Crack Distributor
 
corianderstem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 63,718
Local Time: 01:34 AM
Waitress

5/10

I was seriously underwhelmed by this movie. I am filled with meh.
__________________

__________________
corianderstem is offline  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com