Mike Weir Does Canada Proud - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Lemonade Stand > Lemonade Stand Archive
Click Here to Login
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-13-2003, 08:07 PM   #1
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Michael Griffiths's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
Posts: 3,925
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Mike Weir Does Canada Proud

Finally a Canadian wins the Masters!! And the first left handed player, too, I believe.


http://tsn.ca/golf/news_story.asp?id=37616
Weir wins The Masters in playoff


TSN.ca Staff


4/13/2003

AUGUSTA, Ga. (CP) - Mike Weir beat Len Mattiace on the first playoff hole of the Masters on Sunday, becoming the first Canadian to win a major on the PGA Tour.

The native of Bright's Grove, Ont., calmly sank a six-foot par putt on the 18th green to force the playoff and then watched as Mattiace self-destructed in sudden death.

``It's an unbelievable feeling, something I've dreamt about for a very long time, I've worked very hard for it,'' Weir told CBS. ``It's a thrill. I have a tough time putting it into words, because I probably won't do it justice.

``Once I sit back and reflect I'll know how special it was.''

Weir, recording by far the biggest of his six career PGA Tour victories and third already this season, was rock solid throughout the day and didn't record a single bogey during his final-round 4-under 68.

After both players drove solidly to start the playoff on the par-4, 495-yard 10th hole, Mattiace's second shot was way left of the green, landing in the rough behind a tree.

Weir was next and his six-iron shot landed on the front half of the green, a good 45 feet away from the pin. But he was on the green, while Mattiace went looking at his options.

Mattiace sent a hard punch shot flying across the green, leaving him at least 25 feet away from par. Weir rolled his birdie effort eight feet past, prolonging the tension.

But once Mattiace took two more putts and missed, all Weir needed was a two-putt from eight feet to win a green jacket. His par putt barely missed.

He tapped in for a bogey-five, and raised his arms in glory as the gallery cheered. His wife Bricia came onto the green to hug him.

Weir, less than eight years removed from struggling on the Canadian and Australian Tours, was a Masters champion.

``It was definitely nerve-wracking out there,'' said Weir. ``I just tried to gather myself on each of those putts I had.

``You just can't give one away.''

Minutes later, he was in the clubhouse with Tiger Woods, who put the green jacket reserved for Masters champions on his slight Canadian counterpart.

``All right, Weirsy,'' said Woods.

``Thanks Tiger,'' Weir answered, adding, ``Oh, that feels good.''

Weir was also the first left-hander to win a major since Bob Charles, who won the British Open in 1963.

The previous best Canadian finish at the Masters was George Knudson in 1969, who tied for second.

Mattiace began the day tied for eighth and five back of third-round leader Jeff Maggert, while Weir was two shots off the pace. Mattiace made his way up the leaderboard with a sizzling final round of 7-under 65.

``I was in one of those zones, I was in a very good place,'' said Mattiace. ``I was hitting the shots just the way I was seeing it, and that's all you want to do.

``It was a great feeling doing it.''

On a day when Augusta National glistened under the hot sun and blue sky in 26 C temperature, the expected charge from the likes of Woods, Ernie Els and Vijay Singh never materialized.

Instead, it was an unexpected run for 35-year-old veteran Mattiace, who has two PGA Tour wins to his credit but whose previous best finish in a major was 24th.

Mattiace, playing four groups ahead, waited anxiously as Weir played out his final three holes.

Knowing full well he was in a tie for first at 7-under, Weir didn't show any nerves. He hit a solid shot into the par-3, 170-yard 16th hole, but missed the 10-foot birdie putt to remain in a tie.

His approach shot at the par-4, 425-yard No. 17 hole was right in the middle of the green, Weir not wanting to try the risky pin on the right-hand side in front of the bunker. His long putt burned the edge of the hole to the right and then rolled four feet past, leaving him a testy par effort. But just as he as done all week, he saved par yet again.

Weir headed to the difficult par-4, 465-yard 18th hole needing a birdie, something only two players in the field were able to do Sunday.

After another solid drive down the middle of the fairway, Weir's approach from 199 yards landed on the upper ridge of the difficult 18th green but couldn't stick, rolling back down and leaving him a tough 25-foot putt going uphill. Weir left his putt a good six feet below the hole, and a murmur could be heard in the crowd.

Weir needed to sink a six-footer to force a playoff, and he did, pumping his left fist as the gallery hollered in appreciation of the pressure putt.

It was on to a playoff at the par-4, 495-yard 10th hole.

Weir, meanwhile, wasn't the only lefty on the board Sunday. American star Phil Mickelson, considered the best player never to win a major, finished third with a 5-under 283. Jim Furyk was fourth at 4-under 284.

Woods, meanwhile, never challenged as expected. He shot a 3-over 75 which left him at 2-over 290, his quest for a three-peat at the Masters going down the drain.

``I've played a little better,'' Woods joked afterwards.

Weir's name has been on the leaderboard from the get-go this week. A first-round 2-under 70 was followed by a 4-under 68 in a second round that started Friday and ended Saturday morning. It was Weir's best career round at Augusta National in his fourth Masters.

Weir was the first Canadian to lead after a completed round at the Masters since Vancouver's Stan Leonard led following the first round in 1959 and shared the third-round lead with Arnold Palmer before finishing tied for fourth.

Weir made the turn with a one-shot lead.

His second shot from 199 yards out at the par-4, 495-yard No. 10 hole was short, landing 45 feet short of the pin. A solid birdie effort left him a tap-in par, but Mattiace holed his birdie putt from 20 feet to go 4-under, one behind Weir.

As Weir walked to the tee at the par-4, 490-yard No. 11 hole, a gigantic cheer could be heard from the 13th green. Mattiace had just taken the outright lead at 6-under after an eight-foot eagle putt.

Weir was on the chase again. He stepped and delivered a perfect drive right down the middle of the fairway. A solid approach shot from 128 yards left Weir a 20-footer for birdie. He read the right-to-left effort correctly but burned the left edge of the cup. Another par.

Singh, the 2000 Masters champion, dropped back to 3-under at this point after missing a short part putt at No. 12. He showed his frustration by throwing the ball in the water.

Not the best of shots off the tee at the par-3, 155-yard No. 12 hole left Weir to the far left of the green with the pin on the other side. A 60-foot birdie effort missed right and rolled past five feet. But before Weir could try his par putt, his playing partner met disaster.

Maggert's Masters hopes disappeared after putting back-to-back shots in the creek as Weir watched and scoring a 5-over eight on the par-3 hole.

Once Maggert's horror show was finally done Weir once again saved par, showing tremendous confidence in draining the five-footer.

Then came the par-5, 510-yard No. 13, the hole Weir bogeyed in the third round after hitting the creek on his second shot. Just as Weir walked down the fairway the leaderboard changed on him, Mattiace going to 7-under after a birdie on No. 15.

Weir had 193 yards to the green for his second shot, but he drove his ball to the left side of the fairway. He carried the creek easily but rolled off the left-side of the green. The pin was on the right side, leaving Weir a difficult up and down.

Before Weir attempted long putt off the low fringe, Mattiace increased his lead to three strokes with yet another birdie, this one at No. 16.

Weir's long putt had too much on it, and nearly rolled off the green on the other side where the creek was awaiting. But his ball held on just before the fringe and Weir had an 10-footer going uphill for birdie. Weir answered the bell, making the birdie putt and pumping his fist while going to 6-under, two strokes back of Mattiace.

Just as Mattiace tapped in for par at No. 17 to remain 8-under, Weir's second shot at the par-4, 440-yard No. 14 hole landed in the middle of the green before catching the slope and rolling away from the pin. His long birdie try was short and left him six feet for par. And yet again, the Canadian star dropped it in to stay at 6-under.

Mattiace found trouble at No. 18, missing the fairway on his drive and landing in the pine needles under the trees. He punched out back into the fairway on his second shot. His approach was at the back of the green and he wrapped up his brilliant round with a bogey-five.

Weir, meanwhile, missed the fairway to the left at the par-5, 500-yard No. 15 hole, leaving his ball deep in the high grass which hadn't been cut since Monday. He layed up with a short iron and put the ball in front of the water, leaving him about 85 yards to the hole for his third shot. And what a third shot, one that may be replayed for years to come. His ball planted the green two feet from the pin as the gallery erupted. The cheered even louder when he dropped the birdie putt to tie for the lead at 7-under.

Weir and Maggert arrived at the first-hole green to find a gallery half the size of the one that squeezed around there two groups earlier. But once Tiger was gone to the No. 2 hole, his army followed him.

It was important for Weir to start strong after his back-breaking back nine of the third round, when he blew a six-shot lead with a 3-over 39.

Weir's approach at the par-4, 435-yard No. 1 hole was too heavy, finding the fringe at the back of the green with the pin some 50 feet away at the left front. But Weir recovered with a solid downhill putt that rolled past three feet, which he made for par.

While Weir was looking on, Maggert's Masters took a major downturn on the par-4, 350-yard No. 3 hole when his second shot from the fairway bunker hit the lip and bounced back to hit him. That's a two-stroke penalty. So while Weir rolled in another par to stay at 4-under, Maggert took a triple-bogey seven. Weir was back in the lead at the Masters at 3:30 p.m. EDT.

Weir had the galleries cheering again at the par-3, 180-yard No. 6 hole with a brilliant six-iron that landed two feet from the pin. As he walked down to the green and acknowledged the fervent cheers of the crowd, he coolly stepped up and drained the birdie to go five-under par, giving himself a two-stroke lead at that point over Maggert and Mattiace.

Weir's second shot at the par-5, 570-yard No. 8 hole went to the front-left behind the mounds, not a good place to be. His chip on the following shot barely made it to the front of the green. But a beautiful loft shot left him five feet for par, which he sank in yet another save.

Woods, at this time, was making the turn at 2-over, not what he had in mind.

Weir's approach shot at the par-4, 460-yard No. 9 hole was right in the middle of the green, leaving him about 20 feet for birdie. He settled for a par after missing the hole to the right, making the turn with a 2-under 34 and a one-shot lead on Mattiace and two ahead of Maggert and Singh.
__________________

__________________
Michael Griffiths is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:14 AM   #2
Kid A
 
The Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Holy Roman Empire
Posts: 5,271
Local Time: 04:33 AM
1st lefty in 40 years, poor Phil, actually played fairly well, just couldnt come up with the goods to push himself to the top

why does it have to be about nationality though?

are you all related or something?
__________________

__________________
The Wanderer is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:21 AM   #3
Blue Crack Addict
 
MissVelvetDress_75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: basking in my post-concert glow still mesmerized by the orbit of his hips..Also Holding Bono Close as he requested.
Posts: 25,776
Local Time: 04:33 AM
I really hope Phil wins a major some time soon. he played very well today. I am pleased with Weir's win and also for the fact that he is a lefty
__________________
MissVelvetDress_75 is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:22 AM   #4
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Michael Griffiths's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
Posts: 3,925
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Wanderer:

Yes, all "Mikes" are Canadian and also related to me by virtue of having the same name. Didn't you know that?

But seriously - The Masters is not about nationality, but when the first Canadian EVER wins the masters, it shouldn't go unnoticed -- which is why even the Amercan network that broadcasted it made a big deal out of it. Perhaps *they* shouldn't be making it about nationality?
__________________
Michael Griffiths is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:24 AM   #5
Blue Crack Addict
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: gone
Posts: 17,891
Local Time: 04:33 AM
it's that canadian inferiortiy complex popping up again
__________________
Chizip is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:28 AM   #6
Kid A
 
The Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Holy Roman Empire
Posts: 5,271
Local Time: 04:33 AM
i'll bet you use a 6-iron too, old boy
__________________
send lawyers, guns and money...
The Wanderer is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:28 AM   #7
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Michael Griffiths's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
Posts: 3,925
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Americans are the most patriotic people on earth. Is it so bad that Canada aspires to such heights?
__________________
Michael Griffiths is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:40 AM   #8
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Michael Griffiths's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
Posts: 3,925
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Here's a good article I ran across that also is making such a big deal of of this whole nationality thing. What a coincidence, or maybe it was me who started this whole nationalistic trend? I didn't know I had such influence!


O Canada! Weir Masters his game at Augusta

The fine folks in Bright's Grove, Ontario and the rest of Canada can start to party as Mike Weir brings home his country's first major.

(posted Apr. 13, 7:10PM EDT)
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Mike Weir kept saying it in recent years, but not many listened. He felt he was ready to challenge for a major championship, ready to take that next step. | Forum: Weir great! | Bright's Grove whoops it up

Also: From Q-School to Augusta, Weir remembers his roots

The native of Bright's Grove, Ont., said it again Saturday evening after losing what was at one point a seven-shot lead and carding a 3-over-par 75. Not too many listened.

When world No. 1 Tiger Woods slipped a green jacket on Canada's star golfer Sunday at 7:20 p.m. EDT in the Butler Cabin at Augusta National Golf Club, people around the world paid attention.

"For him to put the jacket on me, I'll remember that for a long time," said Weir.

Weir delivered a spine-tingling performance Sunday, beating American veteran Len Mattiace in a sudden-death playoff following a bogey-free 4-under 68 to capture the 67th Masters, the first major championship in PGA Tour history won by a Canadian.

"It's tough to grasp that right now, but I know it's special," Weir said of what his win meant to his home country.

It was also the first major won by a left-hander since Bob Charles claimed the British Open in 1963. The so-called best lefty in today's game, American Phil Mickelson, finished third Sunday.

It's worth noting what Mickelson said at his Tuesday news conference when asked who he thought would be the next left-hander to win a major: "I'm going to leave that one unanswered. I think we all know the answer to that."

Think again Phil. There may only be five left-handers on the Tour this year, but you're not No. 1.

That would be Weir, who pocketed $1.08 million US for his historic win and vaulted atop the PGA Tour's money list with over $3.3 million already this season.

Weir's accomplishment eclipses anything ever done by a Canadian golfer, even the great George Knudson, whose best at Augusta was a second-place tie in 1969. Weir now has six PGA Tour wins -- three already this season -- two behind Knudson's record mark for a Canadian.

"There have been a lot of great Canadian golfers," Weir said. "It's unfortunate that George isn't around to see this."

More importantly, Weir's stunning victory should go down as one of the greatest Canadian sporting moments in history, certainly challenging Jacques Villeneuve's 1997 Formula One championship and Donovan Bailey's 100-metre gold at the 1996 Summer Games.

Prime Minister Jean Chretien was quick to phone Weir after his win and congratulate him. Chretien, Weir says, was "jumping up and down" as he claimed the prestigious tournament.

"This win is a win for me and my family, but it is a big win for Canada and Canadian golf and the fans that have been very supportive of me," Weir said.

The fans mean a lot to Weir, who has Canadians cheering for him at every PGA stop, including this week in Augusta.

"I felt like I kind of let them down last year, I didn't play very well at all," said Weir, who dropped to 78th on the money list in 2002. "I was very motivated, not only for myself, but for those reasons as well to come out and play well this year."

Canadian fans won't have long to wait to tell Weir how thrilled they are. Weir is expected to attend Monday night's NHL playoff game between Philadelphia and Toronto at the Air Canada Centre. Get ready for a rousing ovation.

The last time Canada had this much to celebrate was last February in Salt Lake City, when the men's Olympic hockey team won gold and ended a 50-year drought. Weir, an avid hockey fan, was in the crowd for that historical moment. Now the national spotlight was on him.

"It's a big moment for me. It's a big moment for Canadian golf and it's a big moment in Canadian sport," Weir said.

It nearly didn't happen.

Weir faced a six-foot par putt on the 18th green with the eyes of Augusta on him, needing to make it to force the playoff.

"I wouldn't wish that putt on anybody," said Weir. "That was the most nerve-racking putt anyone could have. If you miss it, it's a three-putt to lose the Masters."

He made it, of course, just like he had all week, saving par after par with clutch putting.

"It probably was the best I putted," Weir said. "Definitely inside of 10 feet the best I've putted."<

Then came the playoff, and Weir watched asMattiace self-destructed.

After both players drove solidly to start the playoff on the par-4, 495-yard 10th hole, Mattiace's second shot was way left of the green, landing in the rough behind a tree.

Weir was next and his six-iron shot landed on the front half of the green, a good 45 feet away from the pin. But he was on the green, while Mattiace went looking at his options.

Mattiace sent a hard punch shot flying across the green, leaving him at least 25 feet away from par. Weir rolled his birdie effort eight feet past, prolonging the tension.

But once Mattiace took two more putts and missed, all Weir needed was a two-putt from eight feet to win the green jacket. His par putt barely missed.

He tapped in for a bogey-five, and raised his arms in glory as the gallery cheered. His wife Bricia came onto the green to hug him, the same women who once filled in as his caddy in those dark years in the mid-1990s when Weir was struggling to make it, toiling on the Canadian and Australian Tours.

"Yes, it was a long road," Weir said, looking back while wearing golf's famous green jacket. "I mean it took six years to even get on the Tour out of college. And those times missing Q-school and playing overseas and the commitment that takes not only for myself, but my family, my wife.

"And it's an unbelievable progression that I've finally gotten here, but I think even back then I believed that would I would get here somehow. I would figure it out."

Weir, who turns 33 next month, has also come a long way from the nervous second-year player that blew up to an 80 in the final round of the 1999 PGA Championship after starting the day in the last pairing with Woods.

"A lot of hard work has gone in since that PGA Championship," Weir said. "That was the summer of '99, so in three years I have won five tournaments leading into this. That kind of set me up for this week.

"And I gained a lot of experience along the way, worked a lot on my swing, and on my game to tighten that up, make it more consistent. My putting, I worked on that very hard. And that was the difference today. I made literally all my putts inside of eight feet today. And at the PGA that year I don't think I made one of them."<

Mattiace began the day tied for eighth and five back of third-round leader Jeff Maggert, while Weir was two shots off the pace. Mattiace made his way up the leaderboard with a sizzling final round of 7-under 65.

On a day when Augusta National glistened under the hot sun and blue sky in 26 C temperature, the expected charge from the likes of Woods, Ernie Els and Vijay Singh never materialized.

Instead, it was an unexpected run for 35-year-old veteran Mattiace, who has two PGA Tour wins to his credit but whose previous best finish in a major was 24th.

Mattiace, playing four groups ahead, waited anxiously as Weir played out his final three holes.

Knowing full well he was in a tie for first at 7-under, Weir didn't show any nerves. He hit a solid shot into the par-3, 170-yard 16th hole, but missed the 10-foot birdie putt to remain in a tie.

His approach shot at the par-4, 425-yard No. 17 hole was right in the middle of the green, Weir not wanting to try the risky pin on the right-hand side in front of the bunker. His 40-foot putt burned the edge of the hole to the right and then rolled four feet past, leaving him a testy par effort. But just as he as done all week, he saved par yet again.

And then came the tough par putt at No. 18 to force the playoff.

Woods, meanwhile, never challenged as expected. He shot a 3-over 75 which left him at 2-over 290, his quest for a three-peat at the Masters going down the drain.

"I've played a little better," Woods joked afterwards.

Weir's name has been on the leaderboard from the get-go this week. A first-round 2-under 70 was followed by a 4-under 68 in a second round that started Friday and ended Saturday morning. It was Weir's best career round at Augusta National in his fourth Masters.

Not bad for a guy who aftr his first practice round on Tuesday complained that the 7,290-yard course was playing too long for him.

"I wasn't hitting on all cylinders early in the week and possibly the delay until Friday may have helped me a little bit, to get a little bit extra time in, a little extra work," said Weir, who was coming off a missed cut at the BellSouth Classic last weekend. "In fact, I think it did help me."

Weir's past Tour victories:

2003: Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, Nissan Open, The Masters.

2001: The Tour Championship.

2000: WGC-American Express Championship.

1999: Air Canada Championship.

1997: BC Tel Pacific Open (Cdn Tour), Canadian Masters (Cdn Tour).
__________________
Michael Griffiths is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:46 AM   #9
Blue Crack Addict
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: gone
Posts: 17,891
Local Time: 04:33 AM
silly canadians
__________________
Chizip is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:53 AM   #10
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Michael Griffiths's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
Posts: 3,925
Local Time: 09:33 AM
This is huge for not just golf in Canada, but it's also makes for huge sporting significance in Canada. Sometimes people in the US don't really understand what it's like to live in a place such as Europe, Canada, or elsewhere, when a member of the country in question does well in a big American event. I wouldn't expect you to understand, though, as it would require a paradigm shift or a different experience than the one you have. Sometimes, though, all it takes is a little thought.
__________________
Michael Griffiths is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 01:58 AM   #11
Blue Crack Addict
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: gone
Posts: 17,891
Local Time: 04:33 AM
im american i dont think
__________________
Chizip is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 02:01 AM   #12
Kid A
 
The Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Holy Roman Empire
Posts: 5,271
Local Time: 04:33 AM
we try not to think of such things, michael

we dont need another golf war
__________________
send lawyers, guns and money...
The Wanderer is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 02:03 AM   #13
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Michael Griffiths's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
Posts: 3,925
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Chizip - I wasn't addressing the post to you, as I know you're just ribbing me! Sometimes when certain other people rib, however, it's not really in jest, that's all. I'm beginning to have less and less time for those people.
__________________
Michael Griffiths is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 02:19 AM   #14
Kid A
 
The Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Holy Roman Empire
Posts: 5,271
Local Time: 04:33 AM
do you have time for a quick hug at least?
__________________
send lawyers, guns and money...
The Wanderer is offline  
Old 04-14-2003, 02:24 AM   #15
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Michael Griffiths's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
Posts: 3,925
Local Time: 09:33 AM
Aw, thanks Wanderer. I needed that. Man, I've gotta get some sleep. One last final to study for before Wednesday...
__________________

__________________
Michael Griffiths is offline  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com