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Old 07-22-2002, 12:33 AM   #1
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do you know an autistic?

I just thought I'd bring this up. As you can see from my sig, I'm an autistic. I actually have a type of autism called Aspergers' Syndrome. I'd like to know, does anyone know any autistics? Do you have one in your family? If so, what's your impression of them? If it's an "Aspie" like me, it's likely to be "too shy" or "awkward". It can be alot of different things, though. Any thoughts or observations?
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Old 07-22-2002, 01:04 AM   #2
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I have a semi-autistic friend who is one of the most brilliant artists I have come across personally. He's not shy, just soft-spoken but does do wildly crazy things when he's tipsy. Brilliant is really the best word to describe him.

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Old 07-22-2002, 01:14 AM   #3
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i must have had some misinformation about autism....i don't know anyone w/it......well, now i do .....
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Old 07-22-2002, 04:53 AM   #4
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we have a friend of the family that has a mild form. when we were little i just thought he was a little shit basically but i can now see things a little better in my old age. hehe.
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Old 07-22-2002, 05:28 AM   #5
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I spent 2 1/5 years working with Barnardos in the disabilities sector with kids in their various programs. About 50% of them had autism, and only one could probably be called a savant or as having Aspergers. All the kids were remarkable, they fell into a high dependancy category where you obviously dont lol. They were all severe to mild. The one guy who fascinated us the most, was by all outward appearances quite a regular teen. Except for his fascination with bottoms (thanks to a 'Young Ones' addiction ) and this uncanny and almost spooky ability to draw anything he saw on tv EXACTLY how it was. His talent was really phenomenal.
The most obvious thing about them I'd say was especially with the younger groups, was their preffered objects or activities. Water and the act of pouring it was such a favourite past time by these kids, we called them 'obsessions' which is probably not the most pc thing to be doing, but it was in context, and it seemed to be a statistic with the 25 or so we had in the centre. We saw as they got older, these needs to be in the bathroom or sitting under a tap really diminished as they got to the teens.
I hope this thread doesn't sound patronising, or gives false information, as you Verte obviously have a less interupted communication channel, for want of a better word. Autism, in my limited experience comes down to communication. Quite often information can get in, but they can have trouble getting it back out. There are so many varying degrees of it that it is hard to give a good description of your understanding as it is really not going to apply to everyone who has autism. It seems to be a really misunderstood condition and often it is so sad to see people through not knowing better assume the person is stupid. I guess one way I used to look at it was that they are trapped in their own minds to a degree. I'm only talking about the more severe instances of it too, not folks like you Verte who need to have a jug of water at all times or continually draw squares on a piece of paper!
I've rambled on too much so I'll shut up. I find it fascinating though, any info anyone can post would be much appreciated by me!
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Old 07-22-2002, 12:13 PM   #6
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We have a close friend whose 8 year old son is autistic. They were in a lot of denial when he was little and didn't have him evaluated until he was 6 years old. They lost a lot of time in his most formative years and now they are starting to realize what this has cost their son.

I don't know the clinical name of type of autism he has but its pretty severe.

He wasn't potty trained until he was almost 7 (when he started school) and does fairly well in special ed class. He hasn't formed an attachment to anyone other than his grandfather and his verbal skills are at about a 3 year old level. He has a permanent "dreamy" expression on his face and never seems to need any sleep. He can slip away from you in a split second and can disapear in a flash. He is absolutely fearless and will walk out into a busy street, laughing. He can throw a pretty severe tantrum and has scars on his wrist where he bites it over and over again. The only thing that seems to calm him and hold his attention is whatever movie he is interested in at the time, which he will play over and over again, all day if you let him.

One day he was out our house and before anyone even realized he was gone, he had slipped upstairs and shoved everything he could get hands on down the toilet. We pulled out 2 toothbrushes, a comb and mini can of hairspray, a pen, a sock...basically anything he could grab. We ended up cracking the toilet trying to get everything out and his dad had to replace it. He had also run through the bedrooms and knocked the phones off the hook and turned the stereos and TV's on.

His parents were just told that he will need constant care and supervision for the rest of his life and warned them that he is only 8 right now and easy to chase and grab but he won't be so easy to restrain when he is 18 or 20 years old. I seriously don't know what they are going to do.

He really is a beautiful little boy and it hurts my heart to think about what will happen to him when he's older and has to deal with cruel people who might not understand his condition.
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Old 07-22-2002, 01:41 PM   #7
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Hey, cool notes! It's very true that autistics are different. There are differing levels of severity and we have different interests. Fortunately, my case is mild and I'm getting really good treatment and my family is very supportive. Not everyone is so fortunate. It's not always easy for me but everything is under control. There are others that really need help and that's why we have the Autism Society, Cure Autism Now (CAN) and other groups.
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Old 07-22-2002, 02:28 PM   #8
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The girlfriend of my brother cares for autistics in a station or something - to be true, I haven't really listened to her and her stories - and she told us that those people she is working with, were very aggessive and threw things after her all the time, knives if possible. I don't really believe that though. Well, just wanted to say this.
And when I was going to get my First Communion we had to help out one day in a home for autistics - they were mostly friendly, but many were just living in their own world and didn't reacted to anything.
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Old 07-22-2002, 03:01 PM   #9
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when i lived in florida, the house my parents and i lived in for about two years, the neighbours across the street from us had an autistic child. he was very nice and very, very smart, i remember. this was like 1993, and he was a computer whiz. him and i went to the same school, so he would come over to our house in the mornings and wait with me for the bus to come (his mom asked me to). i remember he'd come over every day around the same time, even on weekends, as if we had to wait for the bus. he'd always come over and ask for some chocolate milk. we always were shocked (in a good way of course) that the road happened to be clear, cuz he'd just run across the street without looking or anything, and we lived on a fairly busy street. he was a cool kid. his parents were super nice, too, they'd let me come over during the summer and swim in their pool.
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Old 07-22-2002, 03:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by FallingStar
The girlfriend of my brother cares for autistics in a station or something - to be true, I haven't really listened to her and her stories - and she told us that those people she is working with, were very aggessive and threw things after her all the time, knives if possible. I don't really believe that though. Well, just wanted to say this.
And when I was going to get my First Communion we had to help out one day in a home for autistics - they were mostly friendly, but many were just living in their own world and didn't reacted to anything.

"Living in their own world"--that's *very* common. I remember the first time I ever met a reallly severely afflicted autistic. He was in a wheelchair, even though nothing was wrong with him. He just didn't have the motivation to move. Someone had to dress him and put on his shoes.......he didn't talk. Period. It was like looking at a statue. It kind of flipped me out, to be honest. I'd never seen anything quite like that. Most of the kids I've met are nowhere near that sick, but some of them are. I saw a kid at the clinic a few weeks ago who was making a sculpture out of Play-do. She was in her own little world too, but could take care of herself, and was obviously capable of doing quite a bit!
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Old 07-22-2002, 04:18 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by verte76
"Living in their own world"--that's *very* common. I remember the first time I ever met a reallly severely afflicted autistic. He was in a wheelchair, even though nothing was wrong with him. He just didn't have the motivation to move. Someone had to dress him and put on his shoes.......he didn't talk. Period. It was like looking at a statue. It kind of flipped me out, to be honest. I'd never seen anything quite like that. Most of the kids I've met are nowhere near that sick, but some of them are. I saw a kid at the clinic a few weeks ago who was making a sculpture out of Play-do. She was in her own little world too, but could take care of herself, and was obviously capable of doing quite a bit!
I didn't meant it as an offense, though.
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Old 07-22-2002, 04:32 PM   #12
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wow, verte76, I know very little about autism except what I have seen on tv. my impression was that people who have autism are usually exceptionally bright but have problems communicating with the world around them, but other than this I know very, very little, as I said.

I'm glad things are working out for you though, and this is something I'd like to hear more about; it just fascinates me how brilliant these children often are.
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Old 07-22-2002, 05:23 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by FallingStar

I didn't meant it as an offense, though.

I know--"living in your own little world" isn't necessarily a bad thing. Autistics don't really keep the rest of the world out. We just have our world *and* everyone else's with no real clear-cut distinction. You might say we look at the one "real world" in a different way rather than ignoring it. It's a subtle thing, not at all obvious or explicit.
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Old 07-23-2002, 12:58 AM   #14
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my very best friend's brother has asburgers. for the longest time we thought he was just being obnoxious to get attention (he was 8 when they finally got him tested).

when we all found out what it was, it got really even harder to deal with. i am at their house a fair amount and i am an extremely subtle (well, and not so subtle) sarcastic person, and he never understood me. it has taught me a lot about how the brain works and how different people receive what you say.

his mother has an insane amount of patience with him, and his progress is really coming along nicely (he was very, very afflicted by it).
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Old 07-23-2002, 01:43 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lilly
my very best friend's brother has asburgers. for the longest time we thought he was just being obnoxious to get attention (he was 8 when they finally got him tested).

when we all found out what it was, it got really even harder to deal with. i am at their house a fair amount and i am an extremely subtle (well, and not so subtle) sarcastic person, and he never understood me. it has taught me a lot about how the brain works and how different people receive what you say.

his mother has an insane amount of patience with him, and his progress is really coming along nicely (he was very, very afflicted by it).

Yeah..........this stuff is never exactly easy to deal with, even if your case is mild. There are still hassles and obstacles. I've had to take so many blasted tests. Sometimes it gets exasperating. I once had to take 45 hours of tests in five days. Ugh! That got old.
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