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Old 07-23-2002, 05:28 PM   #16
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How do you take 45 hours worth of test in 5 days??!!? sounds painfull.....
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Old 07-23-2002, 05:59 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by samralf
How do you take 45 hours worth of test in 5 days??!!? sounds painfull.....

Come to think about it.......ouch! It was really tiring. It was Test A, B, C. ad nauseum, they wouldn't stop giving me blasted tests! It was the Testathon From Hell. There was everything from writing tests to math tests to hand-eye coordination tests to...... well, ouch!! I was so glad when I was through with all of that crud. I'd had to take other tests to even qualify to take these tests!!! I thought I'd left Birmingham and moved to Testville. It was boring as hell, that's for sure.
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Old 07-23-2002, 06:30 PM   #18
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I took a class last year from a wonderful prof, Morton Gernsbacher, whose son has autism. The entire class was about autism, and it was fascinating. One of the most interesting parts was talking about all the different qualities that people with autism can have ... that a ton of "normal" people have as well, and never really think about it. Love routine, for example, hate annoying little noises, clothing tags driving you crazy. Things like that.

It was also frustrating to learn how many kids (and adults) with autism are diagnosed as being mentally retarded, when it's really a case of the tests people use for intelligence not being designed for them. It's not that people with autism can't be retarded, but the incidence is actually lower than everyone used to think.

I also read a few books by Temple Grandin, who has autism. They were really interesting.
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Old 07-23-2002, 06:38 PM   #19
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My friends bro is autistic, he is 12 now but he has it badly-he acts like a 5 year old child & needs lots of looking after, he is learning how to talk still but he is the sweetest most adorable kid i know he always hugs and people-hes such a sweet thing
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Old 07-23-2002, 06:44 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mirrorball Girl
I took a class last year from a wonderful prof, Morton Gernsbacher, whose son has autism. The entire class was about autism, and it was fascinating. One of the most interesting parts was talking about all the different qualities that people with autism can have ... that a ton of "normal" people have as well, and never really think about it. Love routine, for example, hate annoying little noises, clothing tags driving you crazy. Things like that.

It was also frustrating to learn how many kids (and adults) with autism are diagnosed as being mentally retarded, when it's really a case of the tests people use for intelligence not being designed for them. It's not that people with autism can't be retarded, but the incidence is actually lower than everyone used to think.

I also read a few books by Temple Grandin, who has autism. They were really interesting.

The "retardation" thing is frustrating, too. Some severe autistics are, but a heck of alot of us are not, we're just socially dysfunctional. This gets misinterpreted, misunderstood, etc, etc, until it drives you up a wall. We get rejected by "normal" people. "Normal"? What in hell's name is that? I don't really think it exists. People who do tend to be a pain in, uh, my a**. I don't think anyone in PLEBA or Interference would call themselves "normal". In fact our favorite guys are about as "normal" as........they're not. That's why I them.
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Old 07-26-2002, 09:55 AM   #21
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Friends of mine have an 8-year-old autistic daughter. She's the sweetest little girl, so loving and giving. When we visit, she always asks me to read for her, which I gladly do, and she's just such a delightful girl. She has a special talent, if she has heard a song on the radio just once, she can recite it perfectly, even if it isn't in her native tongue (Dutch). Also, she has never learned English, but because my boyfriend and other people who visit regularly speak English, she has picked that up too.

On the negative side, she has trouble separating fantasy and reality and she has many nightmares, or she'll just space out all of a sudden and start shaking and talking gibberish to herself.

Btw, it seems that she can see people's auras, which her parents tell us is a talent that other autistic people they know have too.
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Old 07-26-2002, 02:51 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally posted by Klodomir
Friends of mine have an 8-year-old autistic daughter. She's the sweetest little girl, so loving and giving. When we visit, she always asks me to read for her, which I gladly do, and she's just such a delightful girl. She has a special talent, if she has heard a song on the radio just once, she can recite it perfectly, even if it isn't in her native tongue (Dutch). Also, she has never learned English, but because my boyfriend and other people who visit regularly speak English, she has picked that up too.

On the negative side, she has trouble separating fantasy and reality and she has many nightmares, or she'll just space out all of a sudden and start shaking and talking gibberish to herself.

Btw, it seems that she can see people's auras, which her parents tell us is a talent that other autistic people they know have too.

Geez, auras? I can't say I've ever seen an aura. Nope, don't have that gift. Trouble separating fantasy and fact? Uh, I know a little something about that. I once had that problem, it's pretty much under control now. I acted up like that in the school cafeteria when I was a kid and got myself in trouble. I did some pretty nutty things. I can't recite lyrics like that, either, dammit! I have a really good memory for rote stuff, but I can't recite lyrics like that.
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Old 02-28-2003, 10:44 PM   #23
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do you know an autistic?

You're reading a note posted by one!! Actually I have a mild form of the problem known as Asperger's Syndrome. Basically, we are the Introverts From Hell. We're not very social, we screw up in relationships, we can be a pain in your , and the severe cases don't communicate at all. We are quite highly strung and creatures of habit. Does anyone have an autistic in the family? Am I the only autistic in Interference? A certain inquiring mind wants to know!!!
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Old 02-28-2003, 10:48 PM   #24
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There was an autistic guy in my high school (several years ago), and he was an autistic savant - was able to do absolutely incredible things with numbers and dates. It was amazing.
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Old 02-28-2003, 11:00 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally posted by anitram
There was an autistic guy in my high school (several years ago), and he was an autistic savant - was able to do absolutely incredible things with numbers and dates. It was amazing.

My academic background is in history, for what that's worth. I've always been good with dates. I'm not high-functioning enough to be a savant, unfortunately. Some, uh, issues got between me and grad school. Some of these people become Ph.D. profs.
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Old 02-28-2003, 11:25 PM   #26
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Am I the only autistic in Interference?

i can ditto everything you just mentioned, except that i have not been diagnosed as such, the other disabilities being so much more symptomatic and stigmatiz-able...which i won't mention, since they do cause such stigmatizing reactions...

some day, when i do get my s@## together, i plan to SUE the California Education system for not catching the signs (daydreaming, lack of friends, "savant" abilities in certain areas, and especially inclination to listen to music 24/7, when not glued to the TV set, etc) and preventing me from getting started in a
real carreer...lucky for CA Education, i don't have enough money for a lawyer right now

nice to hear a person living, breathing and able to admire such a cosmopolitan band such as the Elevated ones, verte!

"help me if you can, i'm feeling down, and i do appreciate you being round..." just came on the digital...yay BEATLES!
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Old 03-01-2003, 01:09 AM   #27
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My mother is a school teacher, she has taught several autistic children. Personally, I am not aware of having known an autistics, but chances are I have.
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Old 03-01-2003, 04:03 AM   #28
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I used to work in a Vacation Care program with children with disabilities and probably half of them had autism. I spent most of the time with the 13-18 age group and they were all fantastic, especially my one to one guy! A real lovely kid
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Old 03-01-2003, 08:24 AM   #29
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Re: do you know an autistic?

Quote:
Originally posted by verte76
Am I the only autistic in Interference?
Add me to the list!!! Actually, we discovered it through a lucky diagnosis of my son (at age 3). Then we realized how prevalent it is in all the men on my side of the family.

It has been very interesting rediscovering my own childhood through my son. It also has placed a huge burden on my heart that I be able to equip him to face the challenges I faced.
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Old 03-01-2003, 08:39 AM   #30
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Wow, Doug and verte, never would have guessed that you guys have struggled with this, thanks for being so honest
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