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Old 08-04-2008, 08:15 PM   #976
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I have Twilight on hold at the library ... but am something like #300 on the wait list. Heh.

I'd like to see what all the fuss is about.
I just came here specifically to see if anyone's mentioned this series. We heard about it on SF, Sarah started reading them (for the same reasons the SFers did) and then she talked me into reading them. I've been working my way through the series over the past week, and I'm just now 300 pages into the new release.

The SFers are right. But, there is something about them that compels you to keep reading.
There is currently much wank going on in the fandom. I haven't read it yet, but Sarah says it's entertaining.

(If you don't want to wait, I have the files )
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Old 08-04-2008, 08:56 PM   #977
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Atlas Shrugged is the one that requires more "slogging" through than The Fountainhead. There's a 56 page speech by the main character, so, yeah, that takes some work.
How does everyone remember that that speech is exactly 56 pages?
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Old 08-04-2008, 09:16 PM   #978
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1. Geek Love by Katherine Dunn
2. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
3. The Secret History by Donna Tartt
4. The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter (breaking the rules.... )
5. The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle
6. Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie
7. The Handmaid's Tale by Marget Atwood (minus the epilogue )
8. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
9. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
10. Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

...I think.
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Old 08-04-2008, 09:29 PM   #979
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3. The Secret History by Donna Tartt

Great book!!!

Did you read The Little Friend?
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Old 08-04-2008, 09:30 PM   #980
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Woo Hoo sold 18 copies of my book so far!!!!!!!!!
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Old 08-04-2008, 09:35 PM   #981
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Congrats, Justin!

I'm trying to come up with my list now, and I'm stuck at 8. I keep rejecting books, thinking I'm sure I've read better books than that. So difficult.
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Old 08-04-2008, 09:41 PM   #982
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I hate HATE Ayn Rand's masturbatory exercises that she likes to call books. I must have been the only teenager who read them and thought "what a crock of shit!"

But I also really disliked Catcher in the Rye which the rest of my 11th grade English class was salivating all over.

My favourites, in no particular order:

Dickens - A Tale of Two Cities. I have more of an emotional attachment to Oliver Twist, since it was the first grown up book I read, but Tale is funnier and more charming, IMO.

Faulkner - Light in August. Because it's so beautiful.

de Saint-Exupery - The Little Prince. I read this book every year and it never loses its appeal. But you have to get the original illustrated version to fully experience it, I think. I've also read it in French.

Nabokov - Lolita. I still find it very disturbing, but I really like his literary style. There are some gorgeous passages.

Theroux - Dark Star Safari. A must read for everyone who is intrigued by Africa. Funny and heartbreaking tale of the decrepit place we have allowed it to become in the last half a century.

Hesse - Siddhartha. Actually Narcissus and Goldmund is a far better book, but there is a particular line that Siddhartha says to Kamala that had a lot of impact on me, and continues to do so today.

Irving - The World According to Garp. This is my indulgence. Funny, witty, didn't want to put it down. The movie sucked.

Conrad - Heart of Darkness. I read it after I read Theroux's book and I think I probably liked it a lot more because of that.

Coelho - The Alchemist. Because I read it at a point in my life when I needed to believe in things bigger than myself.

Machiavelli - The Prince. Everyone should read it, lots of social value, even today.

Shute - On the Beach. Mostly because I like books that make me think about them long after I've finished reading. What would you do in your last days here?
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Old 08-04-2008, 09:57 PM   #983
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Did you read The Little Friend?
I really like both of Tartt's books. I wish she'd write more.

VP - my only exposure to any wank online about the new Twilight book was a thread in a Live Journal community where it was basically pages and pages of comments about how awful it was, and like it was total Twilight fanfic.

Now I'm even more curious to read the first book. I've read a lot of negative things about them. I'd like to see for myself, but I'm very amused by the wank.
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:07 PM   #984
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Eh, here it is, in no particular order:

The Stand - Stephen King
Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Lolita -Vladimir Nabokov
Breakfast of Champions - Kurt Vonnegut
Midnight's Children - Salman Rushdie
The Golden Compass/His Dark Materials trilogy - Phillip Pullman
The Harry Potter series - JKR
One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch - Alexander Solzhenitsyn
American Gods - Neil Gaiman
1984 - George Orwell

I'm sure if I put more time into thinking of it, the list would change somewhat. It's almost a list of favourite authors, as much as it is favourite books. I could have included any of several books by King, Rushdie, Vonnegut, Gaiman and Garcia Marquez. As well, I know I cheated by including two series, but it's really hard for me to choose a favourite from each. I tend to think of each as more of a whole than as separate novels. Also, many are books that I've either read or reread in the past 10 years. I'm positive that I've read good books before that, I just can't recall them right now.
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:09 PM   #985
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I really like both of Tartt's books. I wish she'd write more.

VP - my only exposure to any wank online about the new Twilight book was a thread in a Live Journal community where it was basically pages and pages of comments about how awful it was, and like it was total Twilight fanfic.

Now I'm even more curious to read the first book. I've read a lot of negative things about them. I'd like to see for myself, but I'm very amused by the wank.
Like I said, I have the files... :tempts:

She's signed up for a bunch of LJ communities just to read the wank! I'm forcing myself to abstain till I've finished.
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:09 PM   #986
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You know what I was thinking about today? You know in the beginning of the Da Vinci code when that guy gets shot or stabbed or whatever, and then he uses his blood to draw a map or a clock and then dies in a CERTAIN GODDAMN POSITION to give clues to people who are coming? I was thinking of that and how much I hated that goddamn stupid book. Ugh.

Anyway...

Ayn Rand - I liked Atlas Shrugged when I was younger, but as I've gotten older it seems somewhat foolish to me. Idealistically, it's probably a great idea, but it has no practical application, really.
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:10 PM   #987
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You know what I was thinking about today? You know in the beginning of the Da Vinci code when that guy gets shot or stabbed or whatever, and then he uses his blood to draw a map or a clock and then dies in a CERTAIN GODDAMN POSITION to give clues to people who are coming? I was thinking of that and how much I hated that goddamn stupid book. Ugh.

Anyway...

Ayn Rand - I liked Atlas Shrugged when I was younger, but as I've gotten older it seems somewhat foolish to me. Idealistically, it's probably a great idea, but it has no practical application, really.
It depends on which of her ideals you're referring to. There's not one line of thought to her work. I find practical applications from some of the things she believed in/I believed in daily.

The Da Vinci Code is a fucking sick joke.
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:11 PM   #988
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Like I said, I have the files... :tempts:

Oh, I missed that! Do you have the file for the first book?
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:11 PM   #989
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Eh, here it is, in no particular order:

The Stand - Stephen King
American Gods - Neil Gaiman
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:12 PM   #990
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It depends on which of her ideals you're referring to. There's not one line of thought to her work. I find practical applications from some of the things she believed in/I believed in daily.

The Da Vinci Code is a fucking sick joke.
The ideal that if you're not going to give me the proper respect and fee to use my train I'm going to move to a fantasy world that you can't find NA NA NA NA NA. That one.
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