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Old 05-05-2008, 07:16 PM   #586
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That's funny, because I actually liked it more than The Satanic Verses. I think part of it may have been that I read that one straight through. I think it's one of the only good so-called rock and roll novels that I've ever read, in large part because it's anchored in the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice.

I really am in awe of the way Rushdie can braid so many different threads. It's something I have a hard time with in my own writing, and I feel like I've learned quite a bit from him in that respect. I got lost in The Satanic Verses quite a bit, though, which is part of the reason I kept putting it aside to read other things. Once I had all of the characters straight (and there's what--25 of them? No wonder I had trouble...), I really got into it, but that took longer than I'd hoped it would.

What stood out to me most by the end of the novel was the commentary Rushdie was making about the nature of good and evil. And after the dense (sometimes in my opinion a little too dense) prose, I loved the simplicity of that last little scene.

I need to read Midnight's Children at some point, especially since I've heard that it bears a striking resemblance to one of my favorite novels, Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things.

My next three reads are going to be relatively quick ones, I think--Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential, Rob Sheffield's Love Is A Mixtape, and Chuck Klosterman's Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs. I also want to pick up Jhumpa Lahiri's new collection of stories.

Now that school is almost done, I'm going to have so much more time to read!
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Old 05-05-2008, 07:48 PM   #587
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Quote:
Originally posted by BonoIsMyMuse
My next three reads are going to be relatively quick ones, I think--Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential, Rob Sheffield's Love Is A Mixtape, and Chuck Klosterman's Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs. I also want to pick up Jhumpa Lahiri's new collection of stories.
"Love Is a Mixtape" is such an awesome book, so sweet and heartbreaking and hopeful. It was nice to get a different view of Rob Sheffield and know him as more than the guy from all those VH1 list shows.
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Old 05-05-2008, 08:04 PM   #588
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Reading To Kill A Mockingbird right now. A great read. College is almost over for me, so it's off to the library as soon as I get home.
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Old 05-05-2008, 09:20 PM   #589
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Quote:
Originally posted by BonoIsMyMuse
That's funny, because I actually liked it more than The Satanic Verses. I think part of it may have been that I read that one straight through. I think it's one of the only good so-called rock and roll novels that I've ever read, in large part because it's anchored in the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice.

I really am in awe of the way Rushdie can braid so many different threads. It's something I have a hard time with in my own writing, and I feel like I've learned quite a bit from him in that respect. I got lost in The Satanic Verses quite a bit, though, which is part of the reason I kept putting it aside to read other things. Once I had all of the characters straight (and there's what--25 of them? No wonder I had trouble...), I really got into it, but that took longer than I'd hoped it would.

What stood out to me most by the end of the novel was the commentary Rushdie was making about the nature of good and evil. And after the dense (sometimes in my opinion a little too dense) prose, I loved the simplicity of that last little scene.

I need to read Midnight's Children at some point, especially since I've heard that it bears a striking resemblance to one of my favorite novels, Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things.
I'm very anxious to hear what you think of Midnight's Children when you get a chance to read it. It's probably in my top 5 favourite novels of all time. It's one of those books where I thought "why the hell did I wait all these years to read this??"

I just glanced at a plot synopsis of The God of Small Things, and it sounds like something I would enjoy, so thanks! After realizing I'd like to read it, I only read the first few paragraphs of it so as not to spoil myself, so I could be mistaken, but it sounds as if Midnight's Children is a bit more political in nature, as opposed to being mostly cultural. I could be wrong in that, though.

I probably should be more open minded about Ground. I think part of the reason I'm a little reserved about it is that I've been reading it for several nights now while my cat has been keeping me up most of the night with her in heat howling. I may be unduly transferring my annoyance with my cat to poor Rushdie.
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Old 05-06-2008, 01:18 AM   #590
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I really want to read Harry Potter now although I still haven't read the books I said I would a long time ago which are Atlas Shruged, Frankenstein and Catcher in the rye.
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Old 05-06-2008, 08:16 AM   #591
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Livy's histories of the 2nd Punic War, some Dorian Gray on the side for fiction.
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Old 05-06-2008, 11:06 PM   #592
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In limbo with a house move has given me some time to read stuff.

Nochnoi Dozor aka Night Watch, by Sergei Lukyanenko.

A good, fun read. I chased this one down after watching the movie and being a bit baffled because it skipped over too many details and also because I'm easily baffled. I wondered why it (the movie) seemed to be universally acclaimed but maybe it wasn't universal, maybe it was only loved by the folks who'd read the book(s) and knew what was going on. So now I've read the book and I know that the movie did leave too much unexplained within the interesting world that this guy has created. The ideas are pretty cool, I heard the world described somewhere as Harry Potter meets The Matrix which is probably as good a one-sentence description as anything else. Anyway this first book is a good quick read and I'm keen to check out the next in the series..

Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson

Bit of a change of pace with this one. I saw the movie years ago and loved it, so the book's been on the must-read list ever since, and it didn't disappoint. I thought this book was brilliant - carefully and beautifully crafted. The copy that I read was a friend's but I need to own my own. I'd be keen to know what others have thought of this one, I know it's pretty popular. Are his other books worth checking out?

Riddley Walker, by Russell Hoban

While chasing up a children's book by this guy that I'd read years ago, I heard about some of his adult fiction and decided to give it a try. Riddley Walker is probably one of Hoban's best known books and now I can see why. It's initially a bit of a bizarre ride as the whole thing is written phonetically ("fun etiquette lee", he would write) in a version of English that's been blasted apart much like everything else after a nuclear holocaust. So there are some crazy but clever turns of phrase in there such as "voat no kynd of fents", but it's surprisingly intuitive and fluid once you get used to it. It was probably like a first language for Hoban when he was eating his mushrooms or whatever. He reckons that he lost the ability to spell after working on the book for five years though. Anyway, the story itself is a pretty good read, and focuses on the power of mythology and rituals, and since it's a post apocalyptic book, the obvious theme of the human tendency to perceive itself as separate from nature, and continually push forward without considering the consequences.

Everything's Eventual, by Stephen King

I love a lot of Stephen King's short stories but am not sure about this collection. He's almost always good at getting in the reader's head and describing thoughts and observing things, and he's more than capable of weaving a great tale, but the trouble here is that some of the tales just aren't great and occasionally the characters are too contrived. I read the stories in order and feared the worst after really not enjoying the first few, however they actually got better. Or maybe my expectations dropped as I went. No, looking at the list now, I think that everything including and after 'The Little Sisters of Eluria' ranges from good to great. Before then, not so good. Speaking of The Little Sisters, it was interesting to read that story again now (it was also in some other collection) after reading The Dark Tower series and knowing more about Roland's world.
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Old 05-06-2008, 11:29 PM   #593
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#25 Smile When You're Lying: Confessions of a Rogue Travel Writer by Chuck Thompson.

A former travel writer, Thompson spends some of the book lodging his complaints against the travel industry and travel writing, but spends more time writing about his own travels and the characters he meets, situations he gets into.

Much of it was very funny and very interesting.
Cool, I gotta read this one. I don't suppose he mentioned Thomas Kohnstamm anywhere, did he? The book by that guy (Do Travel Writers Go To Hell?) might also be worth a look. Makes you wonder, doesn't it?
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Old 05-06-2008, 11:38 PM   #594
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The name doesn't ring a bell, but I might just have a crappy memory.
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Old 05-07-2008, 01:29 AM   #595
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Currently reading loads of Preacher, trying to finish up the series.
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Old 05-07-2008, 02:04 AM   #596
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The Garth Ennis comic? Good choice.
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Old 05-07-2008, 05:18 PM   #597
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I am currently reading Free For All: Oddballs, Geeks, and Gangstas in the Public Library by Don Borchert.

I've worked in a public library for almost eight years. His experiences are so hilarious and so true that it's like reading about what I do everyday.

Libraries just ain't what they used to be, that's for sure

Meggie, I really think you'd enjoy this one, too.
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Old 05-07-2008, 06:28 PM   #598
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That sounds like a book I need to read!
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Old 05-07-2008, 10:53 PM   #599
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You really should, cori. It's both hilarious and disturbing at the same time. I thought when I went to work in a library that I would be meeting lots of well read, intellectual types.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

I could have (and should have!) written this book myself.
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Old 05-07-2008, 11:35 PM   #600
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I'm reading Angels of Death which is about the Hells Angels empire. It's great.
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