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Old 04-21-2006, 09:00 PM   #181
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i've got born in the USA on vinyl. but only because i found a copy at a used music store, not because i'm old that album came out the same year i was born.
Me too...

That's awesome to have on vinyl. I've thought about starting a vinyl collection but I've never gotten around to it. Someday...
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Old 04-22-2006, 02:13 AM   #182
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definitely should
for Springsteen I have Greetings, The Wild..., Born to Run, Darkness, River & Nebraska as well as the Live box thingy, the sound is defintiely sweet. I really want to add Tunnel of Love, Devils and Dust and Seeger Sessio0ns on vinyl.

But yea, for some reason Springsteen, mint conditon vinyls are dirt cheap...I've never paid more than 9 dollars for any
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Old 04-22-2006, 12:18 PM   #183
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The Glory Days video is hilarious!

I love that video... Little Steven, hehe.

yes, I'm weird


And I'm On Fire =
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Old 04-23-2006, 10:06 AM   #184
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All this talk of Born In The USA made me pull out the CD yesterday and listen to it for the first time in ages.

And it still rocks...

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Old 04-23-2006, 11:37 AM   #185
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You know, I love that CD but don't actually own it?

Tuesday (Maybe when I pick up The Seeger Sessions I'll finally get Born In The USA, too )
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Old 04-23-2006, 03:15 PM   #186
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But yea, for some reason Springsteen, mint conditon vinyls are dirt cheap...I've never paid more than 9 dollars for any


i've never paid over $5
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Old 04-23-2006, 05:53 PM   #187
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the Live 1975-1985 cost 8 bucks, everything else was well under 5 bucks
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Old 04-23-2006, 07:46 PM   #188
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ah. i don't have that on vinyl. i've got all the studio albums from greetings through tunnel of love, except for nebraska, which i need to find).

good stuff

the river definitely sounds better on vinyl.
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Old 04-23-2006, 08:31 PM   #189
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good article from today's NY Daily News that a nice person from Int told me about

By DAVID HINCKLEY
Sunday, April 23rd, 2006

A few dozen yards from the deserted Asbury Park boardwalk, where a cold April wind is fighting a warm April sun, Bruce Springsteen steps to the microphone inside an empty Convention Hall and blasts into "This Hard Land," a classic Springsteen tale of desolation meeting defiance.

"Hey there mister
Can you tell me what happened
To the seeds I've sown. ..."

"This Hard Land" isn't a new song. It was bumped off his 1984 "Born in the USA" album and spent a decade on bootlegs before he released it in 1995.

Whatever its history, the song has never sounded like this.

The opening has a country lilt, reinforced when the banjo, fiddles and pedal steel kick in. But it's not exactly a country song. It's more like something out of a Saturday night dance party.

"Once the solos start," he tells the band near the end, "we gotta give it up to the rhythm."

His band can do that, even though it's very different from his E Street Band. This is a 17-piece outfit full of strings and horns. It does include familiar faces like Soozie Tyrell and Springsteen's wife, Patti Scialfa, who also play a big role in working out the vocal harmonies.

Its musical mission is country, folk, gospel, bluegrass, activist anthems, New Orleans jazz, old-style ballads, a touch of blues and whatever else peeks in. After rehearsal and between a few bites of takeout, Springsteen says it's basically "all the beats and styles I don't use with E Street, which is my rock band."

He's doing this now, some suggest, because he has to.

"Bruce makes records that reflect the time in America in which he makes them," says Meg Griffin, a longtime NYC radio host now at Sirius Satellite. "An artist who does not travel new roads experiences creative death, and like all the great ones from Van Gogh to Hendrix, Bruce has the courage to explore his soul."

He also does it because he can.

"I have no rules left," says Springsteen, matter of factly. "I don't have to get on the radio. It's wide open for me. The singer-songwriters I admire - Dylan, Neil Young, Woody Guthrie - move forward all the time."

As does he - a rocker who stepped away for 1982's dark and brilliant "Nebraska," 1995's stark "Ghost of Tom Joad" and 2005's pensive "Devils & Dust."

This time it's "We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions," which is released Tuesday and features 13 songs recorded by, among many others, Pete Seeger.

Some are well-known, like the spiritual "Oh Mary Don't You Weep" and the folk ballad "John Henry," but Springsteen says familiarity wasn't his criterion.

"I looked for characters I knew," he says. "I'd say, okay, in 'Erie Canal,' I know that guy. I know this guy. I heard 'Oh Mary' and I thought, I wrote like that in 'Promised Land.'"

Several songs have spiritual themes, he notes, "and I've written a lot of religious music."

In the folk tradition, he also added touches of his own to traditional songs. The merchant seaman's lament "Pay Me My Money Down" is now a wild workout that includes the line:

"I wish that I was Mr. Gates
They'd haul my money in in crates. ..."

So "The Seeger Sessions" is no exercise in musicology. It's personal. "It returns me to some of the music I was doing when I started recording," he says. "My second album had an accordion, a tuba, jazz sounds, circus sounds. When we streamlined E Street into more of a rock band, we did less of that. So it's an area I like getting back to."

He's also taking it on the road, with rehearsal shows tomorrow through Wednesday at Convention Hall, then three weeks in Europe. Back home, he starts in Boston May 27 and comes to Madison Square Garden June 22 and the PNC Bank Center, Holmdel, N.J., June 24-25.

"This show is going to be fun," he says, because the record was already fun. "We did it in three days, all live, no overdubs."

That's a big step for a notorious perfectionist.

"The sense of raggediness in this music is important," says Springsteen. "You want to keep the raunchiness of the characters, because they were raunchy. They lived in a raunchy time.

"Part of this music is the wide elbow room you feel inside it. I sometimes tell the band, 'If this gets any better, it'll be worse.'"

Another part of his mission now is figuring out which of his own songs fit the tour's rhythm.

"Cadillac Ranch" requires little reworking, but "Open All Night" has become a foot-stomper and "Johnny 99" is now a funk number. Then there's "Adam Raised a Cain."

"It's bluegrass, like from 40 years ago," says Springsteen. "Those guys loved biblical and religious imagery, and they could easily have done 'Adam.'"

The broader challenge, he says, is that "unlike E Street, this band has no previous material. My 30 years of previous songs, we're not playing any of that. I have this long-standing arsenal and all of it is gone."

He laughs. He likes this. Not all of his fans agree.

"I just have no interest," says Mark Ashkinos, a fan since the '70s. "I'm a rocker. When he rocks with 'Where the Bands Are' or 'Mary's Place,' I'll pay attention again."

Springsteen says he will be back - at some point.

"I love playing with E Street," he says. "I always will. I have a bookful of new songs sitting there to play with E Street."

But not yet. "I have a very good and really sizable core audience that's adventurous," he says. "It's not as large as the audience with E Street, but it's a good size and I'm interested in taking them on an adventure."

In Europe, that's a go: Fans snapped up every ticket in minutes. Back home, there may be some hesitation, as this week's Asbury Park shows were not his usual instant sellouts.

He seems confident word will soon get out that these shows are just a plain good old time.

"There will be no seats on the floor," he says. "It's rowdy music. I'm hoping my rock fans will respond to that part."

And no, the man who sang for presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry in 2004 isn't throwing a show without a message.

"I'm always looking for topical things in songs," he says. "Not rhetoric or demagoguery, but broader implications, like in 'Oh Mary' or 'Eye on the Prize.'

" 'My Oklahoma Home' jokes about this guy's woman being carried away by a twister. It's light. But it's really a song about losing everything - and in New Orleans today we have our biggest disaster since the Dust Bowl. That's the way our lives tie into old folk music. It's why songs like this last."

"I guess if you think you'll wake up and walk around tomorrow, you're an optimist," he says, after a brief pause. "And I sing about hope. But I've also played the other end heavily.

"A song like 'Promised Land' has very sharp internal edges. The verses are blues and the chorus is gospel. The blues is like you feel something big pressing down, a real perniciousness, and then you look for something to lift the weight. There's so much brinksmanship. That's how the world feels so often."

Springsteen's contribution to lifting this burden, the reason he still matters even to people who wish he'd play "Jungleland," is music, particularly live music.

So, at the age of 56 and long past the point where he needs the money, he keeps doing it, which makes especially intriguing another verse he adds to "Pay Me My Money Down":

"If I were born a rich man's son
I'd sit on the river and watch it run ..."

Is that going to happen?

"I'd love to watch the river run," he says. "My problem is that I'm not very good at sitting still. My children have taught me to be a little better at it. But I tend to like to keep moving."

And maybe, on the way, keeping track of the seeds he has sown.
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Old 04-23-2006, 08:59 PM   #190
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AP article, I love that quote about the box

Boss Gets Folkie With 'Seeger Sessions'

Sun Apr 23

Bruce Springsteen, rock 'n' roll icon, stands on a cramped Jersey shore stage surrounded by 16 musicians. There's a fiddle, a banjo, a tuba, an accordion — and not a single electric guitar.

The music swells, a glorious noise, as Springsteen leans into the microphone and sings a familiar song: "He floats through the air with the greatest of ease, the daring young man on the flying trapeze."

The vintage tale of a high-flying, womanizing circus star is followed by "Poor Man," a reworking of a Blind Alfred Reed song from the 1920s. This is the music of the moment for Springsteen: folk songs from decades past as he releases an album of songs culled from the Pete Seeger catalogue.

Bob Dylan once went electric. This is Springsteen going eclectic.

"The songs have lasted 100 years, or hundreds of years, for a reason," Springsteen explains in a spartan dressing room after rehearsing with his new big band. "They were really, really well-written pieces of music.

"They have worlds in them. You just kind of go in — it's a playground. You go in, and you get to play around."

"We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions" arrives Tuesday, with a tour to follow (including a trip to New Orleans for the Jazz and Heritage Festival). Springsteen, still damp with perspiration from his rehearsal, sat backstage for a 40-minute interview with The Associated Press that covered his musical past, present and future.

The new album is Springsteen's most sonically surprising since the spare "Nebraska" in 1982. Springsteen compares its variety with his second album, "The Wild, The Innocent and the E Street Shuffle," where the music veered from straight rock ("Rosalita") to jazz ("New York City Serenade") to oompah ("Wild Billy's Circus Story").

Leaning back on a couch, Springsteen said he was intent on getting out more music, including a group of songs already written for the E Street Band and a follow-up to "Tracks," his collection of unreleased studio cuts. He was working on the latter before deciding to do the new record.

"After a long time, you get a lot more secure about what you're doing," Springsteen said between sips from a bottle of water. "I spend much less time making decisions. Incredibly less. It used to be, like, there's a line in a song that I sang a certain way.

"I might mull it over for three days. Maybe longer, right? Now, you know, it's very different. I realize it's not necessary. You know your craft better."

"The Seeger Sessions" featured Springsteen making an album in record time. The rock Hall of Famer, who in the past went years between releases, did the new album in three days. The 13 songs, plus two bonus tracks, were recorded inside the living room of a farm house at Springsteen's New Jersey home — with the horn section playing in the hall.

There were no rehearsals, no arrangements, no overdubs. Springsteen wasn't even sure if the results would become an album.

"It was just playing music," Springsteen said of the sessions. "I didn't have any intention for it. I knew that I enjoyed making this kind of music. ... It was really just purely for the joy of doing it. It was a lot of fun."

Springsteen, 56, is coming off a busy year when he toured extensively behind his Grammy-winning solo album "Devils & Dust." Last year also marked the 30th anniversary of "Born To Run," the classic album that turned the local hero into a worldwide star.

Springsteen first connected with the Seeger songboook in 1997, when he recorded "We Shall Overcome" for a tribute album. His interest grew as he delved into the material — sturdy songs like "John Henry," "Erie Canal" and "Oh Mary, Don't You Weep."

"I wasn't aware of the vast library of music that Pete helped create and also collected," said Springsteen, who was more familiar with the work of Woody Guthrie. "Just this whole wonderful world of songwriting with all these lost voices. Great stories. Great characters."

Like Seeger, Springsteen is well-known for his role as a social activist. In 2004, Springsteen campaigned for John Kerry and criticized the Bush administration for bringing the country to war in Iraq. He's been a longtime advocate for local food banks, and played benefits for union workers, flood victims and other causes.

Seeger paid a heavy price for his beliefs. During the McCarthy era, he was summoned by the House Committee on Un-American Activities as it investigated supposed subversive influences in entertainment. He refused to cooperate and was blacklisted for the next decade.

So was releasing an album of Seeger's songs during President Bush's second term a political statement?

"I'll let somebody else sort that part of it, I guess," Springsteen said. "But a lot of 'em seem pretty applicable, you know? `Mrs. McGrath' is basically an Irish anti-war song, but it's ripped right out of the headlines everyday today."

The songs once sung by Seeger "shine a continuing light on a whole set of not just wonderful stories, but obviously a lot of social issues, the direction the country is going down," he continued. "There's still a place for a lot of that music."

Once Springsteen decided to forge ahead with the project, he called Seeger with the news. Seeger asked which songs would be on the record.

"He'd start giving me the history of each song," Springsteen said. "He actually knows about all those things. So it was an enjoyable conversation, and I hope he likes the record."

Springsteen had no concerns about audience reaction to his foray into a new musical landscape. He expects "the adventurous part of my fans" will enjoy the album. And he considers change a requirement for any successful musician.

"Your job as an artist is to build a box, and then let people watch you escape from it," Springsteen explained. "And then they follow you to the next box, and they watch you escape from that one. ... Escape artistry is part of the survival mechanism of the job.

"If you want to do the job well, you have got to be able to escape from what you've previously built."

There's one other major difference between "Seeger Sessions" and all of Springsteen's previous work: He didn't write a single song for this project.

"A real pleasure," he said of the break from writing. "Once we put it together, it was like, `Wow. I can make records and I don't have to write anything.' There are thousands of great songs sitting out there waiting to be heard, and I know a way to act as an interpreter on these things."

In between finishing up the album and preparing for the tour, Springsteen was inducted into another Hall of Fame — at his alma mater, Freehold High School. Springsteen, whose mother attended the ceremony, was bemused by the award.

"The high school hall of fame was, I suppose, less expected," Springsteen said between smiles. "I was at best a mediocre student, and I was an outcast. I didn't even attend my graduation. I went back in the middle of the summer and picked up my diploma across a desk and I went home.

"It's a little on the ironic side, I'd have to say. But it was nice."
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Old 04-23-2006, 10:36 PM   #191
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Great articles, MrsS.

I can't wait to see him live again.
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Old 04-23-2006, 11:12 PM   #192
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allmusic gives 4.5 stars for this album
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Old 04-24-2006, 01:32 AM   #193
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I listened to The Wild, The Innocent....., which well isn't a rare occasion being that it's my favorite Bruce album, but it was still a great moment and got me more even more enthused for next week.
"And the circus boy dances like a monkey on barbed wire...."
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Old 04-24-2006, 01:39 AM   #194
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articles

the guy from the hudson falcons (mark linskey, and he is from jersey) does a badass rendition of "this hard land."

i'd say that the falcons do a badass rendition of "open all night", but i bet most of you would think the result was sacrelige. it's my opinion that turning it into a street punk song works, though.

i listened to a shitload of springsteen tonight at work. and i was thinking: stolen car vs. stolen car. the album version vs. the version on tracks. i'm inclined to say i like the tracks version a lot better, basically because the melody is more cohesive and i can sing along better/it gets stuck in my head whereas the thing on the river does not. but, the one on the river musically may just fit the lyrics that much closer. did that make sense, or am i talking completely out of my ass?
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Old 04-24-2006, 01:58 AM   #195
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to be completely honest...I've never really gone past disc 1 on Tracks...and not because it's terrible but because I love 85% of it, and I love it a lot! Bishop Danced, Thundercrack, Santa Ana, Does This Bus...., but now you've sparked my interest in the rest...
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