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Old 04-24-2006, 10:46 PM   #16
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Originally posted by U2DMfan
The latter half of each decade has been by far the worst.
But what about 1965-1969? That was arguably the greatest period for popular music ever. You had the Beatles, the Who, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Cream, Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding and a ton of other people releasing all this great music. And Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd were getting their start then, too.

And the latter part of the '70s can hardly be considered a waste when it saw the rise of punk/new wave. I guess you could argue that kind music was mostly unheard of in Middle America at the time so it shouldn't count, but people in other places were listening to it.
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Old 04-24-2006, 11:30 PM   #17
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This reminds me of the music transition of the '70s to the '80s

the '70s Disco and Punk became New Wave and more Pop music in the '80s

look at the late '90s: Boy Bands + "punk" (i used "s because I think true punk died in the '70s and some parts of the mid-'90s) have now become more "New Wave" (the killers, keane, snow patrol, coldplay, franz ferdinand) and "Pop", except more Hip-Hip Pop.

it's all a cycle.
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Old 04-25-2006, 12:04 AM   #18
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But what about 1965-1969? That was arguably the greatest period for popular music ever. You had the Beatles, the Who, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Cream, Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding and a ton of other people releasing all this great music. And Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd were getting their start then, too.

And the latter part of the '70s can hardly be considered a waste when it saw the rise of punk/new wave. I guess you could argue that kind music was mostly unheard of in Middle America at the time so it shouldn't count, but people in other places were listening to it.
Of course the late 60's were great but the time of that musical revolution was largely dictated by technology inventions. You'll also notice that it didn't stop in 1969, that's why I left it out, it's an abberation to today's cycles. It was the saturation of rock and roll becoming stadium and glam and the influx of singer-songwriters that led rock and roll into it's first downward spiral since the invention of the effects box for the guitar.

We are talking very generally here about the mainstream.

So in the late 70's it was obviously about cheesy saturated pop, disco and glam and cheesy arena rock. It was horrible.

The late 80's also had it's shoegazing and birth of hardcore rap but I left that out because it's impact on the maisntream was little to none. Punk didn't seep thru until post punk started making waves around 79 into the 80's. Again, generally.

You could make exceptions to each generalization, that kind of makes this discussion useless.
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