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Old 03-13-2006, 09:57 PM   #61
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I didn't think American Cheese was considered so bad!
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Old 03-13-2006, 10:03 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally posted by Zootlesque
I didn't think American Cheese was considered so bad!
Me either. I wasn't joking about it last time.
American cheese in foldover omelettes, lunch meat sandwiches and grilled cheese sandwiches.
Sounds great to me.
I can't stand strong gourmet cheese anyways.
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Old 03-13-2006, 10:49 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chizip
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Old 03-13-2006, 11:00 PM   #64
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The Production of Cheese

The milk of various animals has been used in the making of cheese: the milk of mares and goats by the ancient Greeks, camel's milk by the early Egyptians, and reindeer's milk by the Laplanders. Sheep's milk and goat's milk are still widely used, but cow's milk is most common. The milk may be raw or pasteurized, sweet or sour, whole, skimmed, or with cream added.

Cheese, especially in the United States, is increasingly made in the factory by application of the principles of microbiology and chemistry. The chief milk protein, casein , is coagulated by the enzyme action of rennet or pepsin, by lactic acid produced by bacterial action, or by a combination of the two. The draining off of the whey (milk serum) is facilitated by heating, cutting, and pressing the curd. The yield of cheese is usually about 10 lb per 100 lb of milk and is higher for the soft cheeses, which retain more moisture. Wisconsin is the largest producer of cheese in the United States.

The byproduct whey consists of water, lactose, albumin, soluble minerals, fats, and proteins. Formerly wasted or used in livestock feeding, whey is now used for the preparation of milk sugar, lactic acid, glycerin, and alcohol, or is condensed and added to process cheese. It may be made into cheese such as the Scandinavian primost and mysost.
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Old 03-13-2006, 11:06 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally posted by U2Girl1978
The Production of Cheese

The milk of various animals has been used in the making of cheese: the milk of mares and goats by the ancient Greeks, camel's milk by the early Egyptians, and reindeer's milk by the Laplanders. Sheep's milk and goat's milk are still widely used, but cow's milk is most common. The milk may be raw or pasteurized, sweet or sour, whole, skimmed, or with cream added.

Cheese, especially in the United States, is increasingly made in the factory by application of the principles of microbiology and chemistry. The chief milk protein, casein , is coagulated by the enzyme action of rennet or pepsin, by lactic acid produced by bacterial action, or by a combination of the two. The draining off of the whey (milk serum) is facilitated by heating, cutting, and pressing the curd. The yield of cheese is usually about 10 lb per 100 lb of milk and is higher for the soft cheeses, which retain more moisture. Wisconsin is the largest producer of cheese in the United States.

The byproduct whey consists of water, lactose, albumin, soluble minerals, fats, and proteins. Formerly wasted or used in livestock feeding, whey is now used for the preparation of milk sugar, lactic acid, glycerin, and alcohol, or is condensed and added to process cheese. It may be made into cheese such as the Scandinavian primost and mysost.
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Old 03-13-2006, 11:07 PM   #66
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Today I had a bad reaction to a fresh mozzarella sandwich at lunch. I may be lactose intollerant.
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Old 03-14-2006, 12:16 AM   #67
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chizip
Provel cheese is the greatest American made cheese.

I declare Provel as the new American cheese.

I don't think I've every tried Provel cheese before, but with cheddar, swiss and provolone, it sounds like the perfect pizza cheese!!

Quote:
Originally posted by Canadiens1160
Are you out of your minds? Who the hell nvented the term "American Cheese" for a thin slice of pre-processed bullshit?
from www.answers.com

The best known processed cheese in the United States is marketed as American cheese by Kraft, Borden Cheese[3], and other companies. It is orange in color and mild in flavor, with a medium-firm consistency. The association between this variety of cheese and the term "processed cheese", combined with the prevalence of processed cheese in the U.S. compared to the rest of the world, has led to the term American cheese being used synonymously in place of processed cheese.

While you will never find me nibbling away at a Kraft single by itself, I cannot deny that processed cheese has its place. What would life be without nachos w/ extra melty cheese & jalepenos I don't relish the fact that American cheese is used synonymously with processed cheese, but I guess that's what we get for eating so many nachos/grilled cheese sandwiches!!!
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Old 03-14-2006, 12:27 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally posted by Zootlesque
Today I had a bad reaction to a fresh mozzarella sandwich at lunch. I may be lactose intollerant.
you need soy cheese



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Old 03-14-2006, 12:40 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally posted by ~unforgettableFOXfire~
'Artichoke Hearts' need to be called 'Bok Choy',
artichokes and bok choy are two very different things.

i eat american cheese. it works best on a chicken salad sandwich. go fuck yourselves.
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Old 03-14-2006, 12:47 AM   #70
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velveeta's better



i wonder if this was made with american cheese

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Old 03-14-2006, 12:53 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally posted by ABEL
i wonder if this was made with american cheese

hmmm perhaps that's the real reason she didn't consume the entire sandwich
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Old 03-14-2006, 01:10 AM   #72
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Velveeta cheese was invented when Kraft people scraping bits of cheese of machines shredding cheddar and mozzarella wondered if they could make a cost effective product by mixing cheese waste and stamping it into a new gelatinous mass. It's the truth.

I used to buy Kraft singles only for grilled cheese, but now I switched to cojack even if it takes longer to melt. However, American cheese never spoils and you can get away with not refridgerating it, so I take it camping for back up grilled cheese.
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Old 03-14-2006, 01:24 AM   #73
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My Down's syndrome aunt likes American cheese slices just plain and in grilled cheese sandwiches, so when it's really cheap I buy some. The crap never seems to go bad though and that kind of creeps me out.

I prefer various other cheeses -- sharp cheddar makes really terrific grilled cheese and great baked mac and cheese.
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Old 03-14-2006, 02:26 AM   #74
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I'm much of a Cheese eater...by itself I mean (I over Supermac and cheese...the kind with the fun shapes)....don't know why
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Old 03-14-2006, 02:43 AM   #75
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American cheese

If someone asks me what I miss most from home, one of the first things I name is cheese.

Dutch cheese
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