Write sentimental/long-winded posts about music you love - Page 8 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Lemonade Stand > Just the Bang and the Clatter
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-31-2011, 01:52 PM   #106
The Male
 
LemonMelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hollywoo
Posts: 65,789
Local Time: 02:05 AM
I am, but Clash City Rockers, Complete Control, and (White Man) In Hammersmith Palais are just that good.
__________________

__________________


Now.
LemonMelon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2011, 11:21 PM   #107
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
blueeyedgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bottom of the earth
Posts: 6,774
Local Time: 08:35 PM
Ever since this thread came about, I knew I wanted to add something, but being lazy/incoherent/whatever, I'm only here now, just before the end of the year.

This year was always gonna be momentous music wise, as sometime in August marked 30 fucking years since I heard Gloria for the first time, on alternative radio, and yes, it changed my life!!! Back in the Stone Age, it was things like discovering an alternative radio station on the dial, finding a late night music programme on one of the 3 commercial channels available that played music that was off the radar, finding a three month old Melody Maker at the city newsagent, that could provide those life-changing moments. And I heard Gloria, and that fade in, and that guitar riff, and the kitchen utensil middle break, and the lyrics that could have been from a straight love song but then on second listen you realised they weren't, and it all added up. And I fuckin' loved it from the get go. Then in October, 3D radio started playing tracks from October, and I went into the indie record shop in the city and found Boy, which I bought Summer 81/82 and the rest, as they say, is history.

Through that discovery of that single, I discovered more "left of the dial" bands from the UK, US, Ireland, bought NME and Melody Maker religiously, bought Hot Press and got to know about a gazillion Irish bands, Ireland's ancient history, Ireland's 80s history (of progressive thought fighting the institutionalised barriers of church and state) and honed my own views on politics, religion, gender, love, hair colour, yep I became a 60s second hand clothed, black haired gothy, leftie, greenie, atheist supporting gay whale marriage and wanted to shag lots of skinny pale guitarists.

Best thing that this journey I embarked upon has given me? An overwhelming love of music. I never cease to be amazed that I can hear a song and just fall madly in love again and again. This year I discovered the National, and each song I discovered of theirs got me in the gut. Seeing them live cemented that love.

And it continues. Last night and well into this morning, I was looking up videos on Youtube of Bono and company busking for the third year on Grafton St Christmas Eve. Bono was the impetus for me searching but I didn't end finding Bono. I found Glen Hansard, who I've loved and admired since seeing him live with the Frames (supporting Dylan) and of course, in Once. And then I discovered Mic Christopher, an Irish muso and mate of Glen's who died in 2001. And I discovered Heyday, which the crowd sang on Christmas Eve.

And through Heyday I've discovereda source of joy again. We can be cynical and blase and dismissive, because it's easy, but to have joy can be hard. Not because it's Christmas or because Hallmark tells you you have to, but just stopping and listening and being in the moment. I give you 3 and a half minutes of pure shared joy expressed in a Youtube video:

__________________

__________________
blueeyedgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2011, 12:53 AM   #108
Blue Crack Addict
 
Moonlit_Angel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: In a dimension known as the Twilight Zone...do de doo doo, do de doo doo...
Posts: 19,255
Local Time: 04:05 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueeyedgirl View Post
I never cease to be amazed that I can hear a song and just fall madly in love again and again.
That's precisely what I love about music, too. I love those songs that, when you first hear them, literally make you stop what you're doing and take notice, or songs, new or old, that you feel an urge to play 20 trillion times over and over and over. And last night my mom heard a song again that she hadn't heard in years...and she still knew all the words. Music is just awesome.

As is this idea for a thread. I shall think about what I'd like to write about and get back to this at some point and time.
__________________
Moonlit_Angel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2011, 01:42 AM   #109
Blue Crack Addict
 
The Sad Punk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: VEGA INTL NITE SKOOL
Posts: 28,691
Local Time: 07:35 PM
That was a lovely post, BEG.
__________________
The Sad Punk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 06:29 AM   #110
45:33
 
cobl04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: East Point to Shaolin
Posts: 55,019
Local Time: 09:05 PM
You know that feeling you get when you listen to an album for the first time and it’s everything you hoped for and more? That’s how I felt upon listening to Rubies. Eschewing the dreamy pop that would come on Kaputt, Rubies shoots for classic rock, and lands somewhere beyond it, thanks to unique Destroyer flourishes and Bejar’s penchant for head-spinning songwriting.

At 10 tracks and 54 minutes, it’s longer than your typical LP, but not for a moment does it outstay its welcome. Pitchfork argued otherwise, but there isn’t a single sub-par track on the record, though admittedly the first half is better than the first.

Perhaps – in fact, most certainly – the reason Destroyer hasn’t come even remotely close to mainstream success or even crossover is because of Bejar. The majority of music listeners don’t particularly enjoy being challenged; Bejar throws curveballs constantly.

There’s the completely nonsensical lyrics that are as endearing as they are entertaining – never has reading a lyric booklet been so much fun. The intertextuality – most of Destroyer’s songs contain multiple references to other Destroyer songs, not to mention the myriad of film, literature, music and art references for the keen-eyed.

Such dense lyricism would normally make it very tough for a listener to appreciate a record on more than a musical level but the amazing thing about Bejar’s lyrics are that they manage to be affecting, in spite of themselves. Take the manic opening lines on “Painter in Your Pocket”.

And I’m reminded of the time that I was blinded by the sun
It was a welcome change from the sight of you hanging like a willow off the arm of yet another visionary, profitous East Van. punk


Under all the verbosity, it all comes back to the same most Destroyer tracks do – girls. There’s something in that that everyone can relate to – no one enjoys seeing the person they like with someone else, in this case a well-to-do bad boy from East Vancouver.

“Painter in Your Pocket” is a break-up/unrequited love affair song, and a brilliant one at that. After the strained vocals of that opening passage, Bejar sings yearningly to the object of his affection over soft drums and a gorgeously simple guitar line. About two-thirds of the way through, it breaks open and becomes one of my favourite indie rock/pop tunes.

The album’s opener, “Rubies”, is nine minutes long and changes tack a number of times. It’s a great example of how Bejar takes what could a simple song and turns it into something more memorable, never allowing the listener to settle.

It begins with guitar distortion and a typically colourful Bejar lyric, “dueling cyclones jacknife / they got eyes for your wife / and the blood that lives in her heart”. The song never returns to this form, giving way to a prodding Spanish guitar sound for the verses, full of wonderful, amusing asides – “shadowy figures babbling on about typical rural shit”, “Priest says ‘please / I can’t stand my knees / and I can’t stand her raven tresses caught up in the breeze like that’”, “I gave my cargo to the sea / I gave the water what it always wanted to be” – which culminate in searing, wholly cathartic guitar riffs amid a cacophony of ha la da da’s. This all ends at six-and-a-half minutes, when Bejar slows things right down, lightly strums the Spanish guitar and muses about brooms, drawings, gratifying dust, golden slumbers and more ha la da da da’s for the next three minutes. Solemn perfection that manages to never outstay its welcome.

Anyone who was lost in that final three minutes should come back around with “Your Blues”, the second track, however. Its upbeat pop melody gives the album a shot in the arm and doesn’t sound much different to the types of songs I imagine they would have played at the indie barns back in the olden days, what with its jumpy, rollicking piano and classic rock guitar line. More Bejar oddity too – “Endangered ape / a couple years in solitary never really hurt anyone / distinguished colleagues / dead music-writers’ brides / I apologise”.

The following track, “European Oils”, is one of my favourite songs of all-time. A strange thing to say considering I’ve probably only known of its existence for about a year, but it’s no exaggeration. Built on a melancholic piano line, this gorgeous tune strolls along heavenly, Bejar wistfully musing about “all the incompatible cells I could take”. The chorus, like many on the album, is more ha la da da’s, amid quickening piano strokes. Duelling guitar riffs, horns and pianos close out a majestic masterpiece, perhaps Destroyer’s best tune.

Another reason that I love this album is that it recalls a lot of late 60s, early 70s David Bowie. It’s plain to see in the piano flourishes, the elaborate lyrics – you could see Bejar penning something like Cygnet Committee – and even some of his vocal affectations. “Looter’s Follies”, with its slow, romantic piano-led waltz and touching lyrical moments – “kid you better change your feathers / cos you’ll never fly with those things” – is the best Bowie song the man himself didn’t write.

The second half is slightly less amazing, though far from ordinary. “Watercolours Into The Ocean” is a gorgeous relaxing tune that literally sounds like wading into a vast sea, with no real direction, just a girl’s watercolours as guidance. “3000 Flowers” kicks off the second half with a positive jolt, Bejar’s double-tracked voice hidden underneath more Bowie piano and a fun guitar hook.

“A Dangerous Woman Up To A Point” is more of the classic rock-inspired music done so well on this record, and one of the more amusing songs lyrically, not even subtly hiding the references. “Have I told you lately that I love you? / Did I fail to mention there’s a sword hanging above you? / Those who love Zeppelin will soon betray Floyd / I cast off those couplets in honour of the void”

“Priest’s Knees” continues in the same vein, adding some deep horns to the mix, and more da da da’s, just in case you didn’t get the point the first seven times around. Luckily, they work so well it never feels overdone, and you can’t accuse Bejar of being short of ideas.

The closer, “Sick Priest Who Learns To Last Forever”, has been maligned by some critics. It stretches the album out beyond 50 minutes at six minutes in length, and its bluesy, drunken feel has been lambasted for being at odds with the rest of the album. But don’t get sucked in by the negativity; it’s a brilliant ending. To me this track has always felt like Bejar deciding their set of songs for the night (the preceding nine, in this case) has been pretty fucking good, and let’s go to the bar for a drink. And hey, look! There’s a stage, and instruments. Let’s get up there and fuck around. The meta, barfly aesthetic of this track has always appealed to me, and adds some fun to the mix.

That’s about all I’ve got to say on the album. I haven’t said it especially well, but then again, I’ve never been a great music writer. I just love music to death, love the way it makes me feel, and so I vomit words onto a page in attempt to get that across to other people. Basically all I’m trying to say is Destroyer is an amazing band, Rubies is an amazing album, and if you have decent taste in music, give it a few listens and tell me what you thought.

Why can’t you see
That life in art
And life in mimicry
It’s the same thing?!
__________________
cobl04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 06:48 AM   #111
The Male
 
LemonMelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hollywoo
Posts: 65,789
Local Time: 02:05 AM
Man, the title track of Rubies is just the sexiest thing in the world. Like, it's a great song to lie back and listen to, but once you peel back the layers, you realize the reason that it sounds so damn smooth is because so much love was put into its arrangement. Everything is exactly where it needs to be in order to keep the song from losing steam.

Your Blues, European Oils and 3000 Flowers are perfect pop songs.

I love Destroyer. Thank you for posting about them some more, no joke.
__________________


Now.
LemonMelon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 06:54 AM   #112
The Male
 
LemonMelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hollywoo
Posts: 65,789
Local Time: 02:05 AM
I want to contribute something to this thread again soon. Almost wrote a few pages about In Ghost Colours the other night.
__________________


Now.
LemonMelon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 07:01 AM   #113
45:33
 
cobl04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: East Point to Shaolin
Posts: 55,019
Local Time: 09:05 PM
I wonder who the next artist I won't be able to shut up about will be.
__________________
cobl04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 07:02 AM   #114
The Male
 
LemonMelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hollywoo
Posts: 65,789
Local Time: 02:05 AM
Neon Trees
__________________


Now.
LemonMelon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 08:17 AM   #115
Rock n' Roll Doggie
FOB
 
nielsgov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Belgium
Posts: 8,596
Local Time: 11:05 AM
Great post cobbler. It makes me want to listen to Rubies again which is exactly what it should do.

What I love about Destroyer, and especially his longer songs, is the fact that it sounds as if Bejar just picks up a guitar and starts playing randomly and then records it. A song like Rubies sounds effortless.
__________________
nielsgov is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 09:16 AM   #116
Vocal parasite
 
Axver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: 1853
Posts: 151,008
Local Time: 09:05 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobl04 View Post
I wonder who the next artist I won't be able to shut up about will be.
Better fucking be Alcest.

Or on a more realistic note, The Chills or Pinback.
__________________
"Mediocrity is never so dangerous as when it is dressed up as sincerity." - Søren Kierkegaard

Ian McCulloch the U2 fan:
"Who buys U2 records anyway? It's just music for plumbers and bricklayers. Bono, what a slob. You'd think with all that climbing about he does, he'd look real fit and that. But he's real fat, y'know. Reminds me of a soddin' mountain goat."
"And as for Bono, he needs a colostomy bag for his mouth."

U2gigs: The most comprehensive U2 setlist database!
Gig pictures | Blog
Axver is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 09:24 AM   #117
45:33
 
cobl04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: East Point to Shaolin
Posts: 55,019
Local Time: 09:05 PM
Things of Stone and Wood. Or Frente.

Or Gin Blossoms.
__________________
cobl04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 09:57 AM   #118
Rock n' Roll Doggie
FOB
 
nielsgov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Belgium
Posts: 8,596
Local Time: 11:05 AM
Probably dEUS.
__________________
nielsgov is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2012, 03:26 AM   #119
Blue Crack Addict
 
The Sad Punk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: VEGA INTL NITE SKOOL
Posts: 28,691
Local Time: 07:35 PM
Rush
__________________
The Sad Punk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 11:39 PM   #120
The Male
 
LemonMelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hollywoo
Posts: 65,789
Local Time: 02:05 AM
It's long overdue, so here goes; my long-winded and highly sentimental Big Star post!

First thing's first: these guys created music that makes you happy to be alive. It rocks, it shakes, it shimmers, it jangles, and ultimately it melts your heart. I have dedicated hundreds of hours over the past three years to digesting their music, and it has been the soundtrack to falling in love, major life changes, depression, and the day-to-day grind. Their music captures a wide range of feelings, from the lovestruck (Thirteen) to the angry (You Get What You Deserve) and on to the apocalyptic (Holocaust). Though they have a reputation as an underground band, the sort that hipsters love to namecheck, the truth is that they're nothing if not a populist band. Their music is very much for everyone, and for all moods. They made three albums, each one distinct, effective and influential on its own merits:

#1 Record (1972): the lovely one; listen to this when life is going good
Radio City (1974): the versatile one; throw this on any day, whether you're pissed off or in the throes of passion for life
3rd (1978): the fucked up one; listen to this when you're on the verge of a nervous breakdown

The arc their albums trace is an emotional and financial one. In the early days, singer Alex Chilton, guitarist Chris Bell, bassist Andy Hummel and drummer Jody Stephens had a lot going for them, including some of the best producers in Memphis and a great deal of industry hype. However, Chilton and Bell were not terribly stable and their stock dropped in large part due to their unwillingness to tour. They were also mediocre live, as they rarely rehearsed.

Instead, they spent weeks and months obsessing over their songs and production, and the initial result was #1 Record, an embarrassment of riches in songwriting and a treat for audiophiles. No less than three of its songs I would consider among the best ever written (Ballad of El Goodo, In The Street, Thirteen) and it boasted some truly brilliant ballads that were anthemic enough to beat Journey at their own game while tapping into songwriting skill of the Beatles. Cheap Trick's cover of In The Street was the theme song for That 70s Show, but Big Star's slightly more understated version (which still rocks) captures zeal for life just as well, while upping the delicious vocal harmonies:

Big Star In the Street - YouTube

It's here that you really tap into what makes the band great: the guitars crunch just right, the harmonies are out of this world but just sloppy enough to feel right, and the lyrics, while nothing extraordinary, communicate the song's message directly and personally.

Steal your car, and bring it down
Pick me up, we'll drive around
Wish we had
A joint so bad
Pass the street light
Out past midnight
Hanging out, down the street
The same old thing we did last week
Not a thing to do
But talk to you


What could be better? The scary thing is that Thirteen is even stronger, sketching out an image of youth and innocence so vivid that you instantly forget how great it is to have your own car and money.

Big Star - Thirteen 1972 - YouTube

There's a lot of power in simplicity, and Big Star always worked that sublimely.

But I wouldn't love this band as much had they stopped short at achingly beautiful proto-power pop. The fact is, they hadn't gained their power yet, truly. Throw in a couple of years of industry negligence and in fighting and you get Radio City, #1 Record's sleazier brother. It is, in many ways, the perfect amalgamation of melody and hard-hitting rock n' roll. The drums are a lot looser, the vocals are sloppier, and the visceral result is one of the greatest records ever.

Big Star-Way Out West - YouTube

It doesn't take a keen ear to pick up on the fundamental destruction of Big Star's poppy facade. They really stopped giving a fuck around this point. And yet there's no shortage of great songs either. September Gurls has been covered by countless artists...

Big Star - "September Gurls" - YouTube

Probably because they couldn't write anything better. One of the greatest examples of chiming guitars and lovelorn lyricism can be found here, besting even the Byrds' peaks. Right here is the blueprint for how to right a masterpiece that clocks in at under 3 minutes.

But, back in their day, no one listened. And so the band effectively broke up, leaving Chilton and Stephens to putter around in the studio for a couple of years, leaving an unfinished record that the label put out for whatever reason. It was called 3rd, and it has today become Big Star's ticket to superstardom in the indie underground. People really eat up underdog stories there, and the legends of mental breakdown and internal strife have given 3rd its appealing aura. What's great is that it sounds just as fucked up as it must have been to record it. By the time it was released, Big Star wasn't a band as such, so keeping to their traditional sound wasn't so important. It resulted in songs like this:

Big Star - Kangaroo - YouTube

Droning middle eastern influence, nonsensical drumming that barely kept time, surrealistic lyricism...Chilton sounds like he's dying...it's the sort of track that earns 3rd its reputation. Velvet Underground covers, Christmas songs and tracks that directly spit in the eyes of the music listeners that spurned them ("thank you, friends...wouldn't be here if it wasn't for you...") don't hurt its cause.

And yet, Big Star never forgot the tunes. Ever. The closing four tracks of the Third/Sister Lovers running order (as opposed to the original 3rd release, which had a bizarre sequence that the band didn't approve of) was as gorgeous as anything they ever recorded. I've gone out walking many nights with Nightime playing:

Big Star - Nightime - YouTube

I make a big fuss about lyrics, but when the delivery is right, and with music that majestic and beautiful playing behind it, lines like "and when I set my eyes on you/you look like a kitty/and when you're in the moon/oh, you look so pretty/caught a glimpse in your eyes/and fell through the skies" might as well be Shakespeare. It sounds childish, but what's wrong with that? When I have kids of my own, I'm probably going to feel similarly moved by their sentiments. I look forward to that, because it really feels awesome to have your walls broken down by something so honest, direct and distinctly human.

As close as my analysis may be of their music, it is ultimately expressions of humanity (love, anger, helplessness) that have caused me to fall in love with Big Star, and not their immaculate influences. I love the way they merge beauty with rock n' roll force, but I love those still, quiet moments in songs like Thirteen even more.

I'm getting very emotional writing this because I'm reminded that I'll never get to see this amazing band live. Alex Chilton passed on in 2010, as I was writing an album of music directly influenced by his work. I cried off and on for a couple of days, and while I eventually got over it, that window to experience their music in the present, in a live setting, died with him. Andy Hummel has passed on as well, last year I believe, and Chris Bell died in a car accident decades ago. Those three albums remain an insect preserved in amber, alive and yet not quite. I marvel at their work, and it continues to influence mine, along with the countless others who loved them (REM, Posies, Replacements, hell, Nirvana, the list goes on), so I suppose it lives and breathes. I play their songs on my guitar all too often, and I think about what it must have been like. It was probably shitty for them. But shittiness results in great art, and sometimes it's beautiful above all else. If you've ever been in love, if you've ever felt awkward or uncomfortable, if you've ever felt slighted, if you've ever been sad, if you've ever been happy, Big Star is the band for you. They've added so much to my life (only U2, The Beatles and maybe Beck have made a more profound addition), and the lives of many others. I hope they can do the same for you.
__________________

__________________


Now.
LemonMelon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com