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Old 07-12-2011, 01:20 AM   #46
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Ok... here goes.

Sigur Ros's music makes me weep. Hard.

I have never felt anything like what that band makes me feel. It is like a religious experience for me, I just feel reborn. Their music makes me look at my life, and want to change it to make it better. I feel inspired, inadequate, and a sense of belonging when I hear them. What are they channeling? seriously, what? I dont understand, but it makes me break down to the essence of my soul. This may sound crazy and over dramatic, but I dont care, Ive been binging on Sigur Ros lately and I have never felt more inspired in my life. Their music is a drug.

When I hear it, I think of waterfalls, nature, life, creation, destruction, being. They are the sound of the world being created and destroyed, simultaneously. The sound of the creation of life and the apocalypse.

When that deep brooding sound from Jonsi's bow on his guitar comes out of the amplifier, I can only think of God. Also, I am agnostic. I dont believe in God, but when I listen to their music, in some way, I do. Their music just lets me know that there is something so much bigger and more beautiful than anything I could ever imagine. But the closest I think we can get is the sound of their music. I wish one day to experience it live. I know of friends who go and just cry their eyes out.

I never thought I would find a band that would move me and my spirit more than U2, but, I did.

To understand what I am talking about, watch this: at 8:20, something enters their music that is indescribable.

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Old 07-12-2011, 03:56 AM   #47
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I don't think I've written about Joni Mitchell yet, so I'll do that while I'm thinking of it. It sprung to mind because I was listening to Sweet Baby James by James Taylor tonight (really dug it) and it made me consider my feelings about the singer-songwriter "genre." James Taylor, Carole King...good. Jackson Browne, Carly Simon...not so much. I wanted to throw Joni in there to break the tie when I remembered that Court and Spark had that sound about it but I considered it cheating. This train of thought made me consider what it is that I love so much about her work, so I thought I'd throw a few of those thoughts in here.

While it may seem to be a very conventional folk record, Blue takes it the extra mile on a number of levels. First, her curious guitar tunings, while hardly an original concept in folk, work uniquely well on this record because they color the sound of the guitar in a unique way (a bluish hue). And, since the record is largely comprised of acoustic guitar, this unique sound affects your mood and absorbs you into its nakedly emotional, claustrophobic world in a way that perhaps it wouldn't if the guitar sounded generic.

It's a bit of a cliche to call a folk or singer/songwriter record "emotional," but that word feels anything but trite as you listen to Blue. In fact, it's one of the few records I've found that actually deserves the word because, though it's a dour record, it's also arguably the most human I've ever encountered. The emotions here range from regret (River), to wonder (Joni's half of the two-faced Last Time I Saw Richard), to optimism (All I Want), to sorrow (Little Green) and back again. I laugh at emo records that purport to reveal their emotions when all they end up being are bitch sessions. There is a conversational attitude that gives heavy, heavy tracks like Blue and River a fleet-footedness you wouldn't expect, and her voice, so cold and pure, gives a simple song like California an emotional edge that cuts through any fluffiness in the lyrics or arrangement. It's basically a perfect album, one that doesn't have to force me to feel sorrowful because it's simply inherent in its sound.

The thing is, I may actually like Court And Spark more. It's damn close, but at this point in her career, it became all too clear that Joni not only had virtuoso musical talent, but an ear for hooks as well. Help Me is a joy to listen to without sacrificing any level of depth; it's an extremely potent hook married to some of the most poignant, sweet, self-reflective lyrics of her career. The album repeats this trick ad infinitum, revealing her skill and newfound lack of shame without losing out on the amazing lyrics. Blue was a bit all over the map topically, but Court And Spark is a focused, profound examination of love that's new, old, broken, twisted, harmful, exhilarating, etc. Then a pop gem like Free Man In Paris or Raised On Robbery will sneak in on occasion to remind you not to take shit too seriously. The introverted tracks are a little better, but those extroverted ones are pretty effective too.

While her next two albums, the last two I'll examine here, aren't my absolute favorites in her discography, those extroverted tracks got a lot better there. In fact, they began to dominate the records; storytelling became a tool for Joni to use in revealing her political, religious and personal feelings on any number of matters (including love), and her characters started growing more vivid. Hissing of Summer Lawn's Edith And The Kingpin and Shades of Scarlett Conquering are incredible character studies and among her finest musical compositions to date, marrying ambition to slinky rhythms and creative chord progressions. The title track's picture of suburban malaise is troubling but evocative, and that bass line is damn catchy in its own way. And yet, these brave, sprawling tracks aren't all that the record has to offer: In France They Kiss On Main Street, Sweet Bird and Harry's House are rocking, lovely and playful, respectively, reminding of the looser/more accessible moments of her previous work while still keeping the quality up. Its follow-up, Hejira, takes that storytelling element to a greater level, stretching desert travelogues endlessly and wrapping them in tougher, dustier instrumentation. When I go to the southwest, I'll be sure to keep Coyote and Amelia on repeat, because they evoke that region splendidly without feeling like lame genre exercises. By this point in her career, her versatility and ambition was at its apex, but the little things were still present: her music from this period (and before) never feels dated because her arrangements are consistently unique and tasteful, and her narratives always serve a purpose, giving listeners reason to unravel her increasingly dense songwriting.

One of the reasons I listen to Joni Mitchell on an all-too-regular basis is that I feel like I'm getting a unique experience with her records. Artists like Steely Dan and Frank Zappa were incorporating jazz into their music very competently at the time, but it's difficult to properly digest their music because it has a coldness about it. You can always get quiet with a Joni Mitchell album, and instead of feeling bored, you'll feel like your best friend is confiding in you. That's a very special thing, and she balances virtuosity with that intimacy, which is even rarer.
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Old 07-12-2011, 06:30 AM   #48
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I've never got into Sigur Ros... probably due to the fact they're foreign, which isn't a very good reason. How do you pronounce it? I have to stop saying Sugar Ross. Didn't impress a cute girl I was talking to.

LM... you used a track from Blue to open your DI7 list. I remember not digging it all that much. Joni Mitchell is on the list, but pretty far down.

~

I would like to talk briefly about my favourite instrumental/ambient/electronica/triphop/mood/etc album. (That includes Massive Attack's first three albums.)



(Endtroducing... by DJ Shadow, for those who don't know.)

My cousin gave it to me one day. Along with VU&N and Lust for Life. It was the last one of the three I listened to, I think. And in my opinion? It was the best of the three gifts.

I'm a huge fan of hip-hop. I think a lot of the time it comes down to the production. A well-produced song can sustain an average rapper, but a good rapper seldom saves a poorly-produced song.

I also enjoy driving around at night-time, to nowhere in particular, listening to music. A lot of music seems better at night. But let me tell you - this is the best record you'll ever come across for late night driving. In my opinion. Particularly if you are in a mellow, can't-help-but-frown mood. The beats are at times thoughtful, calculated, hazy, menacing, hectic, jazzy but they are always good.

The album is constructed entirely of samples. Some people say hip-hop is not very creative; this album immediately refutes that claim. Imagine the painstaking work that it would have taken to create this album! And it all began just as the cover depicts - sifting records.

These are my absolute favourites from the album, though every track is pretty much essential. And it's a real album. You won't enjoy it anywhere near as much if you don't listen to it in full. You'll just think some of the individual tracks are good, but you won't come back to them.

Heavy, dark, rolling beat.

YouTube - DJ Shadow-Number Song ‏

Contemplation and reflection. Now approaching - but never reaching - midnight. One of the best songs of the decade.

YouTube - DJ Shadow - Midnight in a Perfect World ‏

Fat bass.

YouTube - DJ Shadow - What Does Your Soul Look Like, Pt. 4 ‏

Remarkable jazz samples.

YouTube - DJ Shadow - What Does Your Soul Look Like, Pt. 1 ‏

There's a bloke in the comments section who claims he drove around listening to this album with a taxi driver one night, and they became friends. But he was murdered on his shift and had everything stolen but Endtroducing. Could be bullshit, might be true. I just read it then.

Do yourself a favour. Buy this album, get in the car one night, and drive to nowhere for 63 and a half minutes.
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Old 07-12-2011, 12:48 PM   #49
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How do you pronounce it? I have to stop saying Sugar Ross. Didn't impress a cute girl I was talking to.
sigur r�s - pronounciation

Endtroducing 4 life
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Old 07-12-2011, 02:06 PM   #50
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Okay, now that I discovered this thread exists...(and man, a thread where I can rant for way too long about music I love? This thread is awesome. Plus, it's nice to know what music everyone likes, in detail. I can definitely relate to Blue's on One Tree Hill, and LemonMelon's on Stay, and Reggo's on punk although I think my punk rock tastes are more for post-punk...)

I think I'm going to have to give the Runaways some love, because seriously, I live in the land of hipsters and no. one. has heard of this band apart from the movie.

I admit, I started out liking the idea of the band, as opposed to their music, because I had heard of them before the movie but I wasn't the musically adventurous type, not in the slightest. I didn't buy CDs instead of single songs until quite recently, in fact, and I kick myself for it, thinking of all I missed out on...anyway. Teenagers playing punkish rock? Yes. Sounds like the perfect way out from the shitty situation of high school and such. Definitely beyond anything I'd be able to do, too. Plus I kind of hugely worshipped Joan Jett already and the fact that she was in the Runaways was a sort of bonus. I ended up listening to their music aaand...

Once we start with the fact that these girls were all playing instruments in their early teens at least; they were I think in a range of 13-17 years old when the band started, first of all makes me wonder what the hell I've been doing with my life for the past 5 years or so, just making art and stuff. But never mind me. The point is, I've seen bands from my high school, one of the bands only really famous for having Billie Joe's son on drums, and their age definitely plays a part in the music. The kids in my high school in bands, in my opinion, are pretty crap. It's obvious their music skills are crap, if energetic, and they have yet to master their instruments. The Runaways are basically the opposite of this. Lita Ford, in particular, keeps surprising me with the guitar solos that I would expect from a lot more years of practice. "Neon Angels On The Road To Ruin," for example, is amazing. Amazing. I could listen to it over and over...

Anyhow. I fell in love with this band for their more post-punk sounding rock, and expected a bunch of 3-minute long power chord songs ala Ramones. I bought their first album 'The Runaways' expecting this, and getting what I expected. The songs were powerful, packed a punch, but they all pretty much sounded the same when you got right down to it.

I was completely surprised when, upon listening to their album 'Queens of Noise' and expecting exactly the same thing as the last album, getting something completely different. The Runaways on this album have matured a lot more, or maybe not even that; they've learned how to tell their stories better through different musical style. The songs tell stories. "Midnight Music" manages to sound both heartbroken and triumphant, recalling the typical cheap hotels, no money, shitty situation the band had to deal with, but turning right around and slapping that idea in the face: the girls are there to make music, and it's not a bad thing, it's damn exciting and they'd rather do that than be at home anyway. "Born To Be Bad" has a similar dichotomy; Cherie's vocals start out plaintive but rip into the chorus with an energy matching the guitar. 'I won't be coming home no more,' she explains, no apologies whatsoever. Anyhow, out of nowhere, pretty much out of the blue, this album put me through the emotional wringer before I even knew anything about any of the girls' lives that might've inspired the lyrics and the sort of balance between the angst and the ripping guitar solos. Music can talk, even and especially if it's being made by a bunch of teenagers dealing with way more than they bargained for. It's probably that album that strengthened my huge respect for that band.
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Old 07-12-2011, 03:00 PM   #51
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LM... you used a track from Blue to open your DI7 list. I remember not digging it all that much. Joni Mitchell is on the list, but pretty far down.
If you like Aja, I see no reason why you wouldn't dig Court And Spark and/or Hissing of Summer Lawns. I tend to use Steely Dan and that period of Joni together on playlists. Blue is probably not your thing though, no.

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I also enjoy driving around at night-time, to nowhere in particular, listening to music. A lot of music seems better at night. But let me tell you - this is the best record you'll ever come across for late night driving. In my opinion.
I will disagree with you here.

Selected Ambient Works 85–92 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

YouTube - ‪Xtal - Aphex Twin‬‏

You need to hear this record, very soon (I might write an entry for it later). And the Richard D. James album.
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Old 07-12-2011, 06:16 PM   #52
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You need to hear this record, very soon (I might write an entry for it later). And the Richard D. James album.


this. hell, even i like those two albums a hell of a lot.
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:33 PM   #53
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I've been told many times to listen to that. Not sure why I haven't.

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Endtroducing 4 life
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:49 PM   #54
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I did not mean that previous post to read as a slight on Endtroducing, btw. Excellent record, just not my all-time favorite for that one purpose. Man, you haven't lived until you've felt the distant drums of Tha chugging your car forward on a highway late at night. The most cinematic shit in the world, Pitchfork review of Kid A be damned.

Also...seeing DJ Shadow this weekend
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:51 PM   #55
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Yeah I know. 'S'all good.

Now that I have a job again... I'm considering getting tickets for his show.
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:51 PM   #56
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I don't think I've written about Joni Mitchell yet, so I'll do that while I'm thinking of it. It sprung to mind because I was listening to Sweet Baby James by James Taylor tonight (really dug it) and it made me consider my feelings about the singer-songwriter "genre." James Taylor, Carole King...good. Jackson Browne, Carly Simon...not so much. I wanted to throw Joni in there to break the tie when I remembered that Court and Spark had that sound about it but I considered it cheating. This train of thought made me consider what it is that I love so much about her work, so I thought I'd throw a few of those thoughts in here.

While it may seem to be a very conventional folk record, Blue takes it the extra mile on a number of levels. First, her curious guitar tunings, while hardly an original concept in folk, work uniquely well on this record because they color the sound of the guitar in a unique way (a bluish hue). And, since the record is largely comprised of acoustic guitar, this unique sound affects your mood and absorbs you into its nakedly emotional, claustrophobic world in a way that perhaps it wouldn't if the guitar sounded generic.

It's a bit of a cliche to call a folk or singer/songwriter record "emotional," but that word feels anything but trite as you listen to Blue. In fact, it's one of the few records I've found that actually deserves the word because, though it's a dour record, it's also arguably the most human I've ever encountered. The emotions here range from regret (River), to wonder (Joni's half of the two-faced Last Time I Saw Richard), to optimism (All I Want), to sorrow (Little Green) and back again. I laugh at emo records that purport to reveal their emotions when all they end up being are bitch sessions. There is a conversational attitude that gives heavy, heavy tracks like Blue and River a fleet-footedness you wouldn't expect, and her voice, so cold and pure, gives a simple song like California an emotional edge that cuts through any fluffiness in the lyrics or arrangement. It's basically a perfect album, one that doesn't have to force me to feel sorrowful because it's simply inherent in its sound.

The thing is, I may actually like Court And Spark more. It's damn close, but at this point in her career, it became all too clear that Joni not only had virtuoso musical talent, but an ear for hooks as well. Help Me is a joy to listen to without sacrificing any level of depth; it's an extremely potent hook married to some of the most poignant, sweet, self-reflective lyrics of her career. The album repeats this trick ad infinitum, revealing her skill and newfound lack of shame without losing out on the amazing lyrics. Blue was a bit all over the map topically, but Court And Spark is a focused, profound examination of love that's new, old, broken, twisted, harmful, exhilarating, etc. Then a pop gem like Free Man In Paris or Raised On Robbery will sneak in on occasion to remind you not to take shit too seriously. The introverted tracks are a little better, but those extroverted ones are pretty effective too.

While her next two albums, the last two I'll examine here, aren't my absolute favorites in her discography, those extroverted tracks got a lot better there. In fact, they began to dominate the records; storytelling became a tool for Joni to use in revealing her political, religious and personal feelings on any number of matters (including love), and her characters started growing more vivid. Hissing of Summer Lawn's Edith And The Kingpin and Shades of Scarlett Conquering are incredible character studies and among her finest musical compositions to date, marrying ambition to slinky rhythms and creative chord progressions. The title track's picture of suburban malaise is troubling but evocative, and that bass line is damn catchy in its own way. And yet, these brave, sprawling tracks aren't all that the record has to offer: In France They Kiss On Main Street, Sweet Bird and Harry's House are rocking, lovely and playful, respectively, reminding of the looser/more accessible moments of her previous work while still keeping the quality up. Its follow-up, Hejira, takes that storytelling element to a greater level, stretching desert travelogues endlessly and wrapping them in tougher, dustier instrumentation. When I go to the southwest, I'll be sure to keep Coyote and Amelia on repeat, because they evoke that region splendidly without feeling like lame genre exercises. By this point in her career, her versatility and ambition was at its apex, but the little things were still present: her music from this period (and before) never feels dated because her arrangements are consistently unique and tasteful, and her narratives always serve a purpose, giving listeners reason to unravel her increasingly dense songwriting.

One of the reasons I listen to Joni Mitchell on an all-too-regular basis is that I feel like I'm getting a unique experience with her records. Artists like Steely Dan and Frank Zappa were incorporating jazz into their music very competently at the time, but it's difficult to properly digest their music because it has a coldness about it. You can always get quiet with a Joni Mitchell album, and instead of feeling bored, you'll feel like your best friend is confiding in you. That's a very special thing, and she balances virtuosity with that intimacy, which is even rarer.
Nice. Blue is just one of the best records ever made. I know those songs inside out. But I can't even remember the last time I listened to Court & Spark though it was my favorite of hers for a long time. Hissing then became an obsession in college, but that one, too, I put away and haven't returned to it. I don't know if it's because they sound dated to me or if it's because they make me sad. Blue, strangely, doesn't.

And yes, you should listen to Hejira when you visit the Southwest. The minute I hear those opening notes to Amelia I am immediately in a car in 1988 driving to Chaco Canyon with my best friend on our first visit to New Mexico. I already loved Hejira but I fell in love with the desert listening to it, and eventually had to live here.

Amelia is just so.achingly.gorgeous.
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:21 AM   #57
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I've never got into Sigur Ros... probably due to the fact they're foreign, which isn't a very good reason.
Get 'Takk' - lay down somewhere nice, close your eyes and listen. That should just about do it.

I understand the whole 'foreign' thing too. At first, I was hesitant because I didnt understand what they were saying, but then I realized their music is like 'instrumental music' with the voice acting as another instrument, both guiding the music and acting as its own sound. Once you get past the whole language thing then you realize that they can say more without words than almost any band can with lyrics. Somehow you not only know, but feel, what they are saying.
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:27 AM   #58
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Somehow you not only know, but feel, what they are saying.
Although according to some of the translations, in fact, what I felt I knew they were saying could not have been further from the reality, lol. But yeah, the music is so absorbing, the lyrics hardly matter.
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Old 07-13-2011, 11:22 AM   #59
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certain radiohead fans (very few, if any, of the particulars even still post here i'm sure) on this board were the reason i never got into sigur ros, even though i tried to get mofo to get me into the band once or twice.
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:25 PM   #60
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Although according to some of the translations, in fact, what I felt I knew they were saying could not have been further from the reality, lol. But yeah, the music is so absorbing, the lyrics hardly matter.
haha yes. When i read the lyrics to "ny batteri", I couldnt believe how dark and twisted it was. I mean I knew it was a dark song, but gosh...
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