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Old 08-10-2012, 09:05 PM   #406
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I used to love Captain Underpants.
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:09 PM   #407
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It's one of my absolute favorite things to ever exist.

Also, it turns out I missed one Captain Underpants book in 2006, so it hasn't been 9 years since the last one, just SIX.
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:12 PM   #408
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This is one of my favourite people I follow on Twitter. I find her shtick very funny, even like a year after I started following her. A lot of these tweets won't make sense to non-Australians though.

@nadinevoncohen’s (Nadine von Cohen) best tweets
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:14 PM   #409
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Feel like I could drink a thousand whiskey cocktails tonight, you guys.
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:18 PM   #410
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I've read all of his tweets from the last few days and I'm amused.
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:21 PM   #411
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:25 PM   #412
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Thanks...right before I'm about to watch The Lorax too...nothing's going to ever be OK again.
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:26 PM   #413
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Looks like that's by the same guy who did the amazing Ambien Walrus.
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Old 08-10-2012, 10:04 PM   #414
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GAF, I have to tell you, maybe because you might be the only person who might know what/who I'm talking about.

There was a girl at the Sigur Ros show the other night who I swear looked exactly like Analeigh from America's Next Top Model. And she's been in some movies, like Crazy Stupid Love.

It was uncanny. She was tall and slim too, like, you know, a model. I kept running into her when I was wandering around before the show.
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Old 08-10-2012, 10:22 PM   #415
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aww boo, reading back in the thread i missed a whole bunch of language talk. being a double major in german and linguistics, i always like talking about that kinda stuff with peeps. ah well.

on a related note though, whenever anyone asks me my major, their eyes bug out at the linguistics and they act like i'm saying some kind of specialised science. granted i'm not saying it's an easy subject, but i'm pretty sure something like neurobiology is a tad more difficult than this.
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Old 08-10-2012, 10:39 PM   #416
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aww boo, reading back in the thread i missed a whole bunch of language talk. being a double major in german and linguistics, i always like talking about that kinda stuff with peeps. ah well.

on a related note though, whenever anyone asks me my major, their eyes bug out at the linguistics and they act like i'm saying some kind of specialised science. granted i'm not saying it's an easy subject, but i'm pretty sure something like neurobiology is a tad more difficult than this.
That's very cool that you were a linguistics major. I sometimes consider going back to school to get a linguistics degree for fun. Did you enjoy it? I'm curious what you liked most and liked least about studying in that field.
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:12 PM   #417
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In I come and out you go you get
Here we are again now, place your bets
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:20 PM   #418
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Is this the time?
The time to win or lose
Is this the time?
The time to choose
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:27 PM   #419
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Me too. I might hate pavlova and vegemite but the chicken parma is an institution.
Chicken parmigiana was not invented in Australia, for fuck's sake.

Friggin' Cobbler.
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:34 PM   #420
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Parmigiana (a short form of Parmigiana di melanzane) is a Southern Italian dish made with a shallow-fried sliced filling, layered with cheese and tomato sauce, then baked. Parmigiana made with a filling of eggplant (aubergine) is the earliest version. Variations made with breaded meat cutlets, such as veal and chicken, have been popularized in other countries, usually in areas of Italian immigration.

The dish is claimed by both Campania and Sicily. While "parmigiana" usually means "from Parma" (in Northern Italy), the dish is not part of the cuisine of Parma. It is a Southern Italian dish.
In addition to the original Italian recipe, many variations are found world-wide, most often in countries where large numbers of Italians immigrated. Examples of dishes developed outside of Italy from the early parmigianas include veal (Veal Parmigiana) or chicken breast (Chicken Parmigiana) dipped in a mixture of beaten eggs, breaded, shallow-fried and topped with a marinara sauce (red Sicilian tomato sauce) and mozzarella. It is then usually baked until the cheese is bubbly and brown. The veal dish is known in Italian as Cotolette alla Bolognese.[1]
Parmigiana is also used in the names of unrelated dishes which do form part of the cuisine of Parma cuisine, such as trippa alla parmigiana (Parma-style tripe).
[edit]Preparation

The dish consists of a sliced filling pan fried in oil, layered with tomato sauce and cheese, and baked in an oven. In some versions, the sliced filling is first dipped in beaten eggs and dredged in flour or breadcrumbs before frying. Some recipes use hard grated cheeses such as Parmesan, while others use softer melting cheeses like Mozzarella, or a combination of these.
[edit]International variations

This section needs additional citations for verification. (March 2012)


Freshly cooked Chicken Parmesan.
In the United States and Canada, veal parmigiana or chicken parmigiana is commonly served as a grinder or a submarine sandwich. It is also popular with a side of or on top of pasta. Diced onions or green bell peppers, sautéed or raw, are sometimes added.
Chicken or veal parmigiana is a common dish in Australia[citation needed] and Argentina[citation needed] and in both countries often served with a side of french fries or mashed potatoes and salad. In Australia it may also contain a variety of toppings, including sliced ham or fried aubergine slices. This dish is often referred to as a parma, parmi or occasionally on menus as the "Queen of Schnitzels"[citation needed].
In Argentina it is called "Milanesa" (if beef or veal), "de Pollo" (chicken), "de Berenjena" (eggplant) or "de Cerdo" (pork) ending in "a la Napolitana" when served with a slice of ham and topped with a variety of melted cheeses and tomato sauce and/or a slice of tomato; or simplemente Milanesa if served without toppings and garnished with a slice of lemon. Among many other variations are "Milanesa al Roquefort" (with a creamy blue cheese sauce); "Pollo a la Maryland", served with noisette potatoes, peas and sweet creamed corn as side dishes; and "Milanesa a caballo" when topped with a fried sunny-side-up egg.
A similar dish, the Parmo, which uses either pork or chicken, has developed in England.
The Brazilian variation is usually beef, and may often contain vegetables (such as peas) in the topping.
[edit]Name

There are several conflicting theories for the origin of the name parmigiana.
One common theory attributes the name to the use of Parmigiano-Reggiano (Parmesan cheese).[2] For this reason the dish is sometimes called "melanzane alla parmigiana", though "parmigiana di melanzane" is considered more correct.
Another theory attributes the name to an alteration of the Sicilian word parmiciana:
With its liberal use of aubergines and tomatoes, this is most likely an ancient Sicilian dish which, in many cookbooks is erroneously described as deriving its name from Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, one of the ingredients. However "parmigiana" is the Italianization of the Sicilian dialectal word "parmiciana", which refers to the slats of wood which compose the central part of a shutter and overlap in the same manner as the slices of aubergine in the dish."[3]
A variant of this theory traces the name to Sicilian "palmigiana", also meaning "shutter", from the way in which the slices are laid.[4]
As with Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, the word Parmigiana is often rendered as "Parmesan" in English-speaking countries, from the French word for "from Parma."
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