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Old 10-15-2013, 01:40 PM   #46
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It's pretty obvious that people who think that all rap/hip is sexist towards women, violent and use excessive profanity probably haven't listened to a whole heck of alot of it at all really, much less all of it.

I don't know if I can bother with making my millionth top 10 90s album list, but I think in all fairness, it would be pretty tough damn near impossible for me to have a top 10 list from any of the last 4 decades (incl this one) without at least one hip hop album.
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Old 10-18-2013, 03:58 PM   #47
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#2 DEPECHE MODE - VIOLATOR (1990)

Violator is Depeche Mode's most mainstream, chart-climbing album. Although it contains only nine tracks, half of them are tailor-made for the dance floor. This album was conceived when dance-club DJs were gaining recognition alongside original composers. Heavily influenced by techno-pop, the singles "Policy of Truth," "Enjoy the Silence," and "World in My Eyes" prove that DM did their homework. A particular highlight on this fantastic album is the bluesy guitar line Martin Gore lays down on top of the synth-dominated grooves on "Personal Jesus."

All in all, this had to be DM's tour-de-force, at least as far as their '80's sound. Released in 1990, it closed that chapter in their musical evolution with a bang that left the listeners waiting to hear what would come next. A brilliant album of musical excellence and gothic bliss.
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Violator is Depeche Mode's most mainstream, chart-climbing album. Although it contains only nine tracks, half of them are tailor-made for the dance floor. This album was conceived when dance-club DJs were gaining recognition alongside original composers. Heavily influenced by techno-pop, the singles "Policy of Truth," "Enjoy the Silence," and "World in My Eyes" prove that DM did their homework. A particular highlight on this fantastic album is the bluesy guitar line Martin Gore lays down on top of the synth-dominated grooves on "Personal Jesus."

All in all, this had to be DM's tour-de-force, at least as far as their '80's sound. Released in 1990, it closed that chapter in their musical evolution with a bang that left the listeners waiting to hear what would come next. A brilliant album of musical excellence and gothic bliss.
Violator: Amazon.co.uk: Music
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:05 PM   #48
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Interference,

As I listened to it from start to finish for the first time in 1997. I found the jolting guitar at the start of "Airbag" disconcerting, I now took comfort in it. Suddenly, I was able to see the epic beauty of "Paranoid Android". Subterranean Homesick Alien" became more than just another radio song; I finally heard and understood the simultaneous tranquility and desperation in its lyrics (Yorke makes alien abduction sound like quite the sublime experience). "Exit (Music For A Film)" and "Let Down" proved exquisite in both their pain and their majesty. And, on "Lucky" and "The Tourist" I found songs in which I could literally lose myself. Most importantly, I found a moment in each song that touched my soul (when Thom Yorke sings "it's going to be a glorious day" for the second time on "Lucky"; or when the chanting begins on "Paranoid Android"; or Yorke's sweet scream of "you'll know where you are" near the end of "Let Down").

It would be another four or five listens before I could fully process the thematic content of the lyrics on the album. Once I did, the power of the album truly struck me. On OKC, Radiohead vocalize the anxieties we all share about living in this microwaved age, but are too scared or deadened to verbalize ourselves. Are we sacrificing our humanity at the altar of technological advancement? Radiohead seem to reach a pretty bleak conclusion on OKC, but, in the end, the album moved me so much that I understood. What I've come to love about Radiohead's music is its very inaccessibility. It is NOT easy. It is (to employ an overused critical term) DIFFICULT.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazon Customer Review from 2000
and listened to it from start to finish for the first time since I bought it. Where before, I found the jolting guitar at the start of "Airbag" disconcerting, I now took comfort in it. Suddenly, I was able to see the epic beauty of "Paranoid Android". "Subterranean Homesick Alien" became more than just another radio song; I finally heard and understood the simultaneous tranquility and desperation in its lyrics (Yorke makes alien abduction sound like quite the sublime experience). "Exit (Music For A Film)" and "Let Down" proved exquisite in both their pain and their majesty. And, on "Lucky" and "The Tourist" I found songs in which I could literally lose myself. Most importantly, I found a moment in each song that touched my soul (when Thom Yorke sings "it's going to be a glorious day" for the second time on "Lucky"; or when the chanting begins on "Paranoid Android"; or Yorke's sweet scream of "you'll know where you are" near the end of "Let Down"). Now, I understood what all that raving was about at the end of 1997, when critics tripped over themselves to praise this album as one of the decade's best. It would be another four or five listens before I could fully process the thematic content of the lyrics on the album. Once I did, the power of the album truly struck me. On OKC, Radiohead vocalize the anxieties we all share about living in this microwaved age, but are too scared or deadened to verbalize ourselves. Are we sacrificing our humanity at the altar of technological advancement? Radiohead seem to reach a pretty bleak conclusion on OKC, but, in the end, the album moved me so much that I bought "The Bends", an equally stunning gem. As with OKC, it took me a few listens to get into "The Bends", but the thing I've come to love about Radiohead's music is its very inaccessibility. It is NOT easy. It is (to employ an overused critical term) DIFFICULT.
Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: OK Computer [COLLECTOR'S EDITION- 2 CDs]

hahahaha what a fucking joke

Who wants to find the rest?
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:12 PM   #49
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#3 OASIS - (WHAT'S THE STORY) MORNING GLORY? (1995)


It was just one of those odd moments. A beautiful day, and I was walking down the street listening to this album for the first time on my CD player, when I heard them sing: "Another sunny afternoon / walkin' to the sound of my favorite tune..." - and, in that final multiplication of weirdness, that song, Morning Glory, did soon after become one of my favorites as I fell hard for this incredible album.

(What's the Story) Morning Glory? is an expression of raw musical talent. The songs are loud, direct and unapologetic; the lyrics are ambiguous, but sung with real feeling. The tone shifts from the sunny Hey Now! and hard-driving, almost fierce Morning Glory to the more introspective Don't Look Back In Anger and Champagne Supernova, but even in its introspection, (What's the Story) is loud, direct and unapologetic. She's Electric, the only comical song (and pretty darn funny too), somehow doesn't break the mood.

Wonderwall, of course, is - Wonderwall. You could buy the album just for that song alone. When I think about it, though, I sometimes forget Wonderwall is even on here, the same way the rest of Talking Heads' Remain in Light shines seperately from Once in a Lifetime. Wonderwall in (What's the Story) is like the star on top of a Christmas Tree.

It's hard to compare Oasis with any other band from their era - at least, any other good one. Blur was more cerebral and affected, Suede was more sensual, and Morrissey's solo career was in transition. Whether or not Oasis was better than any of those acts is a matter of opinion, but their broad appeal certainly doesn't make them any worse, either. Personally I think they had something many of those other acts lacked, a kind of sincerity. There's something about that old-fashioned brand of rock - songs that just wear well, that bear listening over and over, chorus after ecstatic chorus. A soon to be classic, if it's not already.
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Originally Posted by Amazon Customer Review from 2005
It was just one of those odd moments. A beautiful day, and I was walking down the street listening to this album for the first time on my CD player, when I heard them sing: "Another sunny afternoon / walkin' to the sound of my favorite tune..." - and, in that final multiplication of weirdness, that song, Morning Glory, did soon after become one of my favorites as I fell hard for this incredible album.

(What's the Story) Morning Glory? is an expression of raw musical talent. The songs are loud, direct and unapologetic; the lyrics are ambiguous, but sung with real feeling. The tone shifts from the sunny Hey Now! and hard-driving, almost fierce Morning Glory to the more introspective Wonderwall and Champagne Supernova, but even in its introspection, (What's the Story) is loud, direct and unapologetic. She's Electric, the only comical song (and pretty darn funny too), somehow doesn't break the mood.

Wonderwall, of course, is - Wonderwall. You could buy the album just for that song alone. When I think about it, though, I sometimes forget Wonderwall is even on here, the same way the rest of Talking Heads' Remain in Light shines seperately from Once in a Lifetime. Wonderwall in (What's the Story) is like the star on top of a Christmas Tree.

It's hard to compare Oasis with any other band from their era - at least, any other good one. Blur was more cerebral and affected, Suede was more sensual, and Morrissey's solo career was in transition. Whether or not Oasis was _better_ than any of those acts is a matter of opinion, but their broad appeal certainly doesn't make them any worse, either. Personally I think they had something many of those other acts lacked, a kind of sincerity. There's something about that old-fashioned brand of rock - songs that just wear well, that bear listening over and over, chorus after ecstatic chorus.
Amazon.com: Henry Platte's review of (What's The Story) Morning Glory?
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:17 PM   #50
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OOO! OOO! This looks like a fun game!

Let me try. Let's see, did I do this correctly?


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#5 NIRVANA - NEVERMIND (1991)

If you were born shortly before or after the death of Kurt Cobain, it's hard to imagine how revolutionary this CD was. When "Nevermind" exploded, it drew the line in rock. Bands that were otherwise obscure (Mudhoney, L7, Screaming Trees) were signed to major labels and enjoyed radio-play. Alternative bands that had been around for a few years that were already signed (Soundgarden, Smashing Pumpkins, Alice In Chains) became huge overnight. The early 90s was a really exciting time in rock. Radio had been infested with the likes of bad R&B, Pop and 4th generation hair rock BUT for a while, everything was new and fresh.

The only real drawback for me is that the revolution of "Nevermind" made people close minded about bands they had only just recently loved. Although it is a blessing that some of these bands were shown the door, i.e., Slaughter, a lot of good bands were discarded and trashed rightfully or not. "Nevermind" was certainly the death nail to all old-school rock.
Amazon.com: Daniel Maltzman's review of Nevermind

Quote:
If you were born shortly before or after the death of Kurt Cobain, it's hard to imagine how revolutionary this CD was. When "Nevermind" exploded, it drew the line in rock. Bands that were otherwise obscure (Mudhoney, L7, Screaming Trees) were signed to major labels and enjoyed radio-play. Alternative bands that had been around for a few years that were already signed (Soundgarden, Smashing Pumpkins, Alice In Chains) became huge overnight. The early 90s was a really exciting time in rock. Radio had been infested with the likes of Slaughter and Trixter, and, for a while, everything was new and fresh.

The only real drawback for me is that the revolution of "Nevermind" made people close minded about bands they had only just recently loved. Although it is a blessing that some of these bands were shown the door, i.e., Slaughter, a lot of good bands were discarded and trashed rightfully or not. "Nevermind" was certainly the death nail to all old-school rock. Most of these bands were killed overnight.
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:18 PM   #51
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:20 PM   #52
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Oh, one more, then I'm done. I'm sure you can find every single one if you wanted to. Maybe with a word or two changed to make it "his". And just to be clear, these reviews are a decade old in some cases, spread years apart, from different authors, and from different cities. What a fucking muppet

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#7 SMASHING PUMPKINS-SIAMESE DREAM (1993)


The drum rolls, then falls away for a building electric guitar, a drum, and a searingly vibrant wall of sound that rises before your very ears. This is the start of "Siamese Dream," a vintage Smashing Pumpkins album and one of the best, most underrated alternative rock albums ever released.

Opening with a bang is the dizzying "Cherub Rock," a song that serves as a perfect springboard into the heart of this album. It can shift in an instant between pulse-pounding (the deceptively-named "Quiet") and more progressive ("Hummer"). Corgan's range stretches even to the quiet ("Sweet Sweet"), the dramatic ("Disarm" with its bells and violins) or the catchy ("Spaceboy").

Perhaps the most outstanding thing about the Pumpkins is their seamless blend of metal, neo-psychedelica and art-rock. The blasting electric riffs, sprawling melodies, and the whirling, sinuous guitars are all interwoven without so much as a sonic burp. At first glance, it seems like a fairly typical rock/metal album, but upon further listening, the alluringly complicated music begins to filter itself fully into your brain. Corgan's lyrics aren't for the perky among you -- angsty and introspective, while avoiding the trap of self-pity.

It's difficult to find a musical flaw with the Pumpkins in "Siamese Dream." Corgan's high voice flitters between murmuring and wailing. Backing him up are James Iha's layered, whirling guitar riffs and Jimmy Chamberlain's controlled, fast drumming. Acoustic guitar also gets to shine at the start of "Disarm." What sounds like church bells is even used.

Fiercely adventurious, brooding and expressive, "Siamese Dream" is a breathtaking ride into a majestic rock world all its own. Inventive and enticing, this is a modern classic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazon Customer Review from 2004
The drum rolls, then falls away for a building electric guitar, a drum, and a searingly vibrant wall of sound that rises before your very ears. This is the start of "Siamese Dream," a vintage Smashing Pumpkins album and one of the best, most underrated alternative rock albums ever released.

Opening with a bang is the dizzying "Cherub Rock," a song that serves as a perfect springboard into the heart of this album. It can shift in an instant between pulse-pounding (the deceptively-named "Quiet") and more progressive ("Hummer"). Corgan's range stretches even to the quiet ("Sweet Sweet"), the dramatic ("Disarm" with its bells and violins) or the catchy (the plaintive "Spaceboy").

Perhaps the most outstanding thing about the Pumpkins is their seamless blend of metal, neo-psychedelica and art-rock. The blasting electric riffs, sprawling melodies, and the whirling, sinuous guitars are all interwoven without so much as a sonic burp. At first glance, it seems like a fairly typical rock/metal album, but upon further listening, the alluringly complicated music begins to filter itself fully into your brain. Corgan's lyrics aren't for the perky among you -- angsty and introspective, while avoiding the trap of self-pity.

It's difficult to find a musical flaw with the Pumpkins in "Siamese Dream." Corgan's high voice flitters between murmuring and wailing. Backing him up are James Iha's layered, whirling guitar riffs and Jimmy Chamberlain's controlled, fast drumming. Acoustic guitar also gets to shine at the start of "Disarm." What sounds like church bells is even used.

Fiercely adventurious, brooding and expressive, "Siamese Dream" is a breathtaking ride into a majestic rock world all its own. Inventive and enticing, this is a modern classic.
http://www.amazon.com/Siamese-Dream-...ews/B000000WJZ
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:21 PM   #53
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I'll give you a high five if I ever see you again
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:30 PM   #54
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Thank you for reading.
No, thank you for plagiarizing
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:35 PM   #55
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I've listened to lots of music, and "Superunknown" doubtlessly stands as arguably the bands best album I have ever heard. Visionary, perfectly executed and technically impeccable, Soundgarden set the standard for dark hard rock with this one.
Wait, now I'm confused.... Have you listened to lots of music or had Wheelchair Assassin listened to lots of music in 2001?

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Originally Posted by Amazon Customer Review by Wheelchair Assassin in 2001
I've listened to lots of music, and "Superunknown" doubtlessly stands as arguably the best album I have ever heard. Visionary, perfectly executed and technically impeccable, Soundgarden set the standard for dark hard rock with this one.
Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Superunknown
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:37 PM   #56
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Holy shit!!!

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Old 10-18-2013, 04:44 PM   #57
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Oh, I like. You'd think that a person on a U2 site could at least write a few lines about Achtung Baby, wouldn't you?

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#1 U2 - ACHTUNG BABY (1991)


[Considering the community I am posting in, I am sure no one is surprised by my first choice]

In a word: staggering. I don't know if I've ever heard an album which can even come close to capturing the kaleidoscope of sheer emotion that floods from these twelve songs. a brave venture into unknown territory and a brilliant musical transformation for the band. The album is packed with just as much passion as previous albums, but the lyrics are much more emotionally poetic and far less political. Musically, the tracks are a wealth of intoxicating dance beats and lush guitar riffs. "The Fly" opens with guitarist The Edge's trademark reverberations cutting through the opening verse like a speedboat slicing through choppy water; on "Mysterious Ways," Bono's one-man gospel choir belts out the praises of an adored woman.

Easily U2's best, if not the best of the entire 1990's.
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In a word: staggering. I don't know if I've ever heard an album which can even come close to capturing the kaleidoscope of sheer emotion that floods from these twelve songs.
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The album is packed with just as much passion as previous albums, but the lyrics are much more emotionally poetic and far less political. Musically, the tracks are a metropolis of intoxicating dance beats and lush guitar riffs. “The Fly” opens with guitarist The Edge’s trademark reverberations cutting through the opening verse like a speedboat slicing through choppy water; on “Mysterious Ways,” -
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:45 PM   #58
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a review salad!
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:46 PM   #59
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So if anyone else like myself was questioning the disparity between the well written reviews and the poorly written, grammatically incorrect, borderline mouth breathing everyday conversations... well, there's your answer
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:47 PM   #60
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Hahahaha well fucking done.
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