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Old 10-10-2013, 04:37 PM   #16
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I always liked Harvey Danger's cover of 'Save It For Later'. I don't remember much of their actual original material though....
Yeah, I liked that cover as well. And hated flagpole sitta. And never heard another song of theirs otherwise.
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:02 PM   #17
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Carlotta Valdez, Terminal Annex, and Old Hat are where it's at. And Sad Sweetheart of the Rodeo off King James Version.
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Old 10-12-2013, 12:04 AM   #18
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90's Nostalgia Part II: Top Albums 11-20

So upon realizing the 90's had quite a few more gems than the "Top Ten", I had previously mentioned. I figured we could further open the subject up to more "loved albums from the 90's" and why is that? What makes that particular album special?

#11 WEEZER - WEEZER (a.k.a. THE BLUE ALBUM) (1994)

Blending the best aspects of pop, punk and grunge, Weezer's eponymous debut came as a much needed bit of relief to the too-serious American indie scene of 1994. Produced (and strongly influenced) by former Cars frontman Ric Ocasek, Weezer blends churning, power-pop guitars with Beach Boys harmonies and the awkward lyrics of singer/songwriter Rivers Cuomo. On standout tracks such as "In The Garage" and "The World Has Turned And Left Me Here", Weezer introduced the wider world to the then-new concept of Geek Rock. However, it was "Buddy Holly"--and its corresponding Spike Jonze-directed video--that propelled this album into the charts. Unfortunately, this song also branded them as nothing more than another novelty act, an unfair fate for an album--and band-- that's since had so much influence.

#12 GUNS N' ROSES - USE YOUR ILLUSION I & II (1991)

The consensus among most critics and the general public is that both "Use Your Illusion" albums contain a lot of filler. It has often been said that a single album, with the best of both volumes, would have been better than two separate albums. Although this is the general consensus among Joe Public, the hard-core Guns N' Roses fans know better.

In my opinion, the Illusion albums have very little filler. It would also be hard to have a single album with songs from each disc, as each Illusion album is its own entity. The Illusion set is not a single album with two separate discs. Both volumes are albums in their own right, with a different tone, vibe, and feeling. The colors on the album covers represent the atmosphere of the albums. "Use Your Illusion I" is brighter, more up-beat, glossier. "Use Your Illusion II" is more reflective, and overall darker.

Between both volumes, there is over two and a half hours of music. Both volumes need to be nursed and savored. The listener needs time to let it all sink in. Some of these songs are fast paced rockers in the vein of "Appetite For Destruction." Other songs are longer, up to ten minutes in length, with intricate solos and complex arrangements, in short, art-rock.

With an album like "Appetite For Destruction" under their belt, any follow-up would be criticized. But much had changed for GN'R since they hit it big. They were now multi-millionaires and no longer living in poverty in cheap apartments in L.A. Also, the lineup of the band had changed. Drummer Steven Adler was fired, and replaced by Matt Sorum. Sorum's drumming was slicker, more technically proficient. Also added to the lineup was keyboardist Dizzy Reed. The new GN'R was more polished, less rough-around-the-edges than they had been in the days of AFD.

GN'R branched out artistically for their follow-up, and naturally received a lot of criticism. Common complaints are--the band went soft, too much filler, to arty, etc.

To address these criticisms: (1) The band did not go soft. There are ballads, but there are also a lot of rockers. A lot of the singles were the ballads, so someone unfamiliar with these albums might conclude that the band went soft by listening to the radio/MTV and conclude that these songs (Don't Cry, November Rain) represent the album, when in fact, they do not. (2) As for there being too much filler, that is a matter of opinion. I happen to think that each song ranges from very good-to classic. A lot of GN'R's very best songs are buried in the set. Because there is so much music, a lot of the songs remain unknown to the general public and are therefore considered "filler." (3)A lot of these songs are art-rock. They are often long in length and are not instantly assessable-and are therefore dismissed. A lot of these songs are quite intricate and take time to fully appreciate.

Bottom Line: When Guns N' Roses were good, they were very, very good, and some of the material on this album is unsurpassable.

#13 SOUNDGARDEN - SUPERUNKNOWN (1994)

I've listened to lots of music, and "Superunknown" doubtlessly stands as arguably the bands best album I have ever heard. Visionary, perfectly executed and technically impeccable, Soundgarden set the standard for dark hard rock with this one.

I can't really think of a place to start in praising this album, but Chris Cornell's vocals are as good a place as any. From the hushed tones of "Fell on Black Days" to the cathartic wailing of tunes like "My Wave" and the propulsive singing of "Fourth of July," Cornell can simply do it all. His dark, churning, guitar riffs, aided by Kim Thayil's soaring, distorted solos, complete the powerful atmosphere of these songs. Add in Matt Cameron's nimble and inventive drumwork and the result is a musical masterpiece.

The variety of this album is also noteworthy, as it mixes hard rockers like the perfect "Spoonman" along with the opening double shot of "Let Me Drown" and "My Wave" melding into slower, more melodic numbers like the hits "Fell on Black Days" and "The Day I Tried To Live. but most of this vicious disc leaps straight for your jugular. The megahit "Black Hole Sun," is easily the best track on the album.

"Superunknown" boasts all that serious music fans could possibly want, from creativity to technical precision to complex arrangements to a truly masterful and powerful overall vocal performance from Chris Cornell. A masterpiece in every sense of the word. Generations in the post-millennial future will one day refer to this record to discover exactly how 1990s rock & roll was.

#14 HOLE - LIVE THROUGH THIS (1994)

If you can listen to this album, unbiased, you will come out of it a better person. Courtney's cries about, not just feminism, but prophetic loss and being jerked around are so incredibly heartfelt. P.S.-to those who say Kurt wrote some of the album's hooks, forget it-Courtney and Eric(Erlandson-the lead guitarist) wrote some of these songs before she even met Kurt-and there is recordings to prove it.

"Miss World" has an entrancing, "Malibu"-esque type ambiance. The chords on "Jennifer's Body" and "Gutless" are written and arranged so beautifully, you'd think Patti Smith became a guitarist and these are her vocals transformed into music. Their is no doubt this album turned me onto Hole and the beauty of the band, Courtney and Kristen's angelic harmonising in songs like "Asking For It" and "Softer, Softest." Courtney's obvious skill in harmony was even evident then, ever evolving into now, with new bassist Melissa Auf Der Maur taking a more crucial vocal role and adding extra grace to Courtney's edge. Patty Schemel may just be one of the greatest rock drummers in history.

This whole album is filled with scathing fury, mostly directed at the impossible situation that confronts women when they are asked to be both wild sources of pleasure and virginal mother figures. This album is plain and simply: outstanding.


#15 U2 - ZOOROPA (1993)

Zooropa. The only U2 album made by U2, for U2, with little to no concern about what anyone thought about it. Perhaps they realized the sound was so ahead of its time that, for once, it didn’t matter if anyone bought it. A one-chord electro-blitz about a crashed car? Johnny Cash taking over for Bono, playing a futuristic post-apocalyptic cowboy? Bono singing in falsetto for 7 minutes about lemons? This is what U2 are capable of when they aren’t concerned with world domination through a hit album.

Strange, Confounding, Joyous, Introspective, Conceptual....are some singular words to describe the beautiful baby of Achtung.

Upon hearing this for the first time, I was convinced that U2 were now viewing themselves as 4 David Bowie's and I relished the thought of their very own "Berlin Trilogy" which is Achtung, Zooropa and Pop. Most conservative fans don't understand them but the insiders do. U2 unfortunatly
would start the next Millenium playing it safe, leaving me fondly recalling the days when the "inmates took over the asylum".


#16 PEARL JAM - Vs (1993)

After the amazing success of Pearl Jam's first record Ten, some wondered how they would follow up their impeccable success to one of the most popular and highest selling albums to emerge from the Seattle "grunge" movement in the early 90's. Hence, Pearl Jam triumphantly returned with their most blistering and powerful album ever conceived. By taking the raw and unmitigated audacity and power inherent in Ten with the unmistakable guitar talents of Mike McCready, and Jeff Amaent, the ferocity of Jeff Ament on Bass, and Dave Abbruzesse nailing away at the drums like an animal hyped up on acid who hasn't eaten for days, Eddie Vedder nails the lyrics to the wall for all to read and contemplate, as Pearl Jam come to the forefront of what they would record in their entire catalog with this wholely impeccable and flawless album.

From songs about Vedder's disgust for law-enforcement officials in WMA (due from an encounter he and an Afican-American friend had while standing outside of PJ's recording studio), to breaking up and forgetting about a loved one in RearView Mirror, each song is a relentless assault on your audial cavities, as each song holds such power and meaning that few could argue that this sophmore effort was not only one of Pearl Jam's best albums, but one of the best rock-albums of all time. From the opening track Go we are greeted with an audial burst of creativty, as the guitar solos have become more compressed, and diligently placed along with the vocals, thus creating a faster paced and more accutely accurate portrayal of the bands increased talent and intensity, along with the ability to create songs that echoed the shadow of the early to mid 90's.

There are no throwaway songs, as the album meshes together in such a way that you just pop the cd in let it play and let your senses take over. For you radio friendly types though heres the list: Go, Animal, Daughter, Dissident, RearView Mirror, and Elderly Woman Behind the Counter in a Small Town (you just gotta love that name), each of these songs was a hit radio single, and the other songs in between just help bridge the gap between the songs included beforehand. However, it is in songs such as Leash, where Vedder lets the parents know to drop the leash and get out his Fu**ing face that we see just what PJ was striving for; the ability to do what we want without the restrictions of not only our parents, but perhaps even society as well holding us back. Perhaps it is in the heartfelt and closing meditation of Indifference, that as the album closes we find ourselves taken back from the intensity of their whole opus, as we lay back in our chair and let the soothing closure of this amazingly conceived album come to a close, as the second chapter of PJ's history comes to a close only to be followed up the obscure and
experimntal masterpiece that was Vitalogy.


#17 OASIS - DEFINITELY MAYBE (1994)

In 1994, Grunge rock had deteriorated from the fresh, brooding energy of Stone Temple Pilots and Nirvana to the contrived repetitions of Bush and Silverchair. The once mighty Pearl Jam ("Ten," and "Vs.") had evaporated artistically with Eddie Vedder's recession into increasingly greater self-obsession and personal misery. The era was clearly in its final throes and rock fans were primed for something different. A record that spoke to the idea of rock as possibility and exuberance.

Into this greasy world of longhaired suicide cases and pseudo-nihilism came Liam and Noel Gallagher with brash English smiles and swaggering Manchester impudence. "Definitely Maybe" is an album seemingly replete with one simple message - I wanna be a rock-`n'-roll star! It is this mantra that makes the record, and indeed the band itself, so important in an era where mediocre substance too often supersedes rock's spirit. "Definitely Maybe" brings us back to the days when lusty-eyed youths willed fame and fortune through guitar strings and makes us forget the languid, whining, shallow psychology that cried its way into so much of 90's rock.

While each song on the album stands on its own, it is the entirety of this effort that warrants notice. The message is clear: "In my mind my dreams are real," Liam grinds in the opening track, unsurprisingly named "Rock `N' Roll Star." And while so many of the songs are just out-and-out Brit-rock fun (i.e. "Shakermaker," "Up in the Sky," "Digsy's Diner," etc.), there are several seriously arresting tracks as well. "Supersonic" features Oasis at their punkiest, while "Slide Away" seems to transcend the album itself, leaning, in a way, toward much of Oasis' more mature work yet to come. "Cigarettes and Alcohol" is as appropriate a maxim as can be expected from the Gallagher's - defiant, working-class urban dissenters first and artists second. And "Live Forever" is a salient single with some of the greatest in recent rock lyricism: "Maybe I just wanna fly / wanna live, I don't wanna die / Maybe I just wanna breathe / maybe I just don't believe / Maybe you're the same as me / we see things they'll never see / You and I are gonna live forever."

"Definitely Maybe" is not an album of subtle orchestration or complex conception, but then that was never the point. In the mid-90's, as in the mid-70's, rock had begun to take itself too seriously as a genre, and had consequently rendered itself an overblown parody. Oasis is to grunge what the Sex Pistols (and Punk in general) were to 70's rock - a slap on the wrist. A reminder that rock is not about art - it is about anti-art. It is about fun; expression; defiance. And with these as standards, "Definitely Maybe" is an album that immerses itself deeply within the spirit of rock stardom as it was once perceived - and an album that proves beyond any doubt that the spirit is still alive.

#18 R.E.M. - AUTOMATIC FOR THE PEOPLE (1992)

This is the pinnacle of the band's achievements and this cannot be disputed. REM has come a long way since the early days of college music and Michael Stipe having mustard in his hair. If the enormous success of Out of Time didn't establish them as one of the greatest bands of the 80's & 90's, this album leaves absolutely no doubt about that!
REM tones things down on this masterpiece and makes wide ranging social commentary. "Drive" starts by instucting voters not to get "Bushwhacked" in the line "smack, crack, bushwhacked, tie another one to the rack, baby". The hauntingly beautiful "Everybody Hurts" has won numerous MTv awards and these are all justified. Many critics believe that this suicide ballad is very depressing, but upon closer inspection it is in fact an incredibly uplifting song. "Take comfort in your friends" and "you are not alone" shows that there is hope and solice to be found in those around us. "Try not to Breathe" is often refered to as commenting on euthanasia and Dr. Death's practises. "monty got a Raw Deal" discusses the life and career of actor Montgomery Cliff and the happenings during his life. The legendary Andy Kaufman is immortalised in the track "Man on the Moon" and later in the movie by the same name. the orchestral arrangement on "Nightswimming" is breathtaking while the final track "Find the River" leaves us a hope-filled final line:"All of this is coming your way".

Comparisons will always be made. It is important not to make this comparison according to sales figures, but based on the contribution that an album makes to the industry. This album's value cannot be underestimated. It has severed as inspiration to artists like the late Kurt Cobain, Counting Crows and Live. Some have gone as far as to compare it favourable to the Beatles "Sgt. Pepper's".

This is a must have album, not only to fans of the band, but to lovers of exceptional music.


#19 RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS - BLOOD SUGAR SEX MAGIK (1991)

With valuable assistance from producer Rick Rubin, the Peppers find just the right blend of punk, funk, and hip-hop. Even with a running time of 74 minutes, this 1991 breakthrough has continuity and cohesion both within and across the 17 cuts. Riding Flea's surging bass, Anthony Kiedis delivers his explicit lyrics with a rapper's flair, extolling the virtues (and outlining the dangers) of sex and drugs. Plaintive ballads such as "Breaking the Girl," "I Could Have Lied," and the hit "Under the Bridge" give the album depth and provide contrast to the raw energy of "Mellowship Slinky in B Major," "Funky Monks," and "Give It Away." Rubin masterfully fuses John Frusciante's raunchy guitar with the irresistible grooves.


#20 U2 - Pop (1997)

Pop is the dirty uncle of the trilogy - the kind of relative the family would like to lock up and shut into a back room. Pop is the most difficult of all of U2's releases.

With the massive "ZooTV" tour and record-combo of "Achtung Baby" and "Zooropa" behind them, the attitude as U2 re-convined in 1995 for a work on a new record was decidedly progressive: they would continue to push the envelope as far as they could musically, technologically, and conceptually. Because of technological aspect of it, this was U2's hardest record to produce. It took so long to complete that it went into what was supposed to have been tour rehearsal time(for the new "Popmart Tour", which was to be bigger and more massive than even "ZooTV"). As a result they were not ready when the tour started in Las Vegas. More importantly, the string of critical success that U2 had going back to the late 80s finally came to an end in 1997 when "Pop" was released, as the reviews were very lukewarm, even poor. U2 were disappointed with its sales...and the fact that "Pop" sold 6,000,000 copies should tell you something about their standards.
U2's peak was over, but I will forever hold that this record was unfairly criticized just because it was so different from everything U2 did before it, but that's a staple of U2's career: change. 'Do You Feel Loved', 'If God Will Send His Angels', 'Staring At The Sun', 'Last Night On Earth', 'Gone', 'If You Wear That Velvet Dress', and 'Please' are just great songs. Also standing out is the closer, a song of desperation and despair, 'Wake Up Dead Man'. This album may have seemed about lemons and arches and colors and videos making fun of the village people(the opener, 'Discotheque') and all fun and games on the outside, but in reality the lyrics of this record are the most serious and cynical of U2's career. Not many people realize that 'Staring At The Sun' is a political song, describing how suits and ties can be just as deadly as soldiers with guns. 'Please' is as serious as it gets lyric-wise: "And love is big, bigger than us, but love is not, what you're thinking of".

U2 did a lot to help this record by putting out some great performances of its songs, especially 'Staring At The Sun' and 'Please', including a emotion-high show in Sarajevo, the first rock show their since their war ended. But towards the end of the tour, it became obvious that they had gone as far as they could in the direction started in Berlin in 1990. They felt the need to tone everything down and just be four guys in a band again. This first came to the public's eyes in the form of old songs that hadn't been performed in a long time, showing up in the setlists of the later "Popmart" shows, such as "Sunday Bloody Sunday". The public would soon get a more blatent show of this change of direction, but unfortunately, it would also leave this album in the dust. Vastly underrated and underappreciated, this is still a very good record.

Thanks for your time.
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Old 10-12-2013, 12:14 AM   #19
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1990 - 1995 contained the best music of the decade. Full of anti-pop and raw rawk sounds. Those opening chords of "Teen Spirit" really ushered in a exciting 5 years of music.

1996-2000 contained some of the worst music of the decade. Full of boy band/ girl power - teen pop. Britney Spears effectively killed a great decade with that ominous piano role of....Baby One More Time. uuugh!

It seems mindless pop music always wins out in the end.
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Old 10-12-2013, 12:27 AM   #20
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(to make it easier I'll exclude any Russian/eastern music)

I'm not going to bother with the order.

Manic Street Preachers - The Holy Bible
Manic Street Preachers - This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours
Radiohead - The Bends
U2 - Achtung Baby
U2 - Zooropa
Kent - Isola
Underworld - Second Toughest In the Infants
Mansun - Six
Sigur Ros - Agaetis Byrjun
Massive Attack - Mezzanine

(honourable exclusions include Adore, Transient Random-Noise Bursts With Announcements, Pop, XTRMNTR, 13)

I think 1997 may be my favourite year for music.
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Old 10-12-2013, 12:40 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Mount Temple View Post
1990 - 1995 contained the best music of the decade. Full of anti-pop and raw rawk sounds. Those opening chords of "Teen Spirit" really ushered in a exciting 5 years of music.

1996-2000 contained some of the worst music of the decade. Full of boy band/ girl power - teen pop. Britney Spears effectively killed a great decade with that ominous piano role of....Baby One More Time. uuugh!

It seems mindless pop music always wins out in the end.
This doesn't represent the quality of the decade very well. If you take the top 40 alone into account, the first five years of the decade were shockingly bold, certainly. Tracks like Loser and She Don't Use Jelly got radio play. It was a strange time.

The latter part of the decade is full of fresh, exciting rock music though. The seeds for a number of genres, including post rock, were planted around that time. Some of the purest, best indie rock was coming out in 96 and beyond. Hip hop was in its golden era (94-96). Artists like Beck, Ween and Super Furry Animals were making joyous, funny, strange music. If you dig a little, the late 90s were fantastic. 99 in particular is a favorite year of mine.

Of course, I also disagree that Baby One More Time is anything less than a great pop song. It's also a world apart from a lot of rock music being released at the time.
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Old 10-12-2013, 01:50 AM   #22
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RYM says that the nineties is my decade with the highest average rating, so that shows I'm pretty fond of the period. In fact, two of my three favourite albums ever are from 1999 alone (the third is UF). Sticking to one album per artist:

1. Anathema: Judgement (1999)
2. Porcupine Tree: Stupid Dream (1999)
3. Agalloch: Pale Folklore (1999)
4. Medicine: Shot Forth Self Living (1992)
5. The Chills: Submarine Bells (1990)
6. Whipping Boy: Heartworm (1995)
7. Crowded House: Together Alone (1993) [my work here is done, Ashley]
8. Ride: Nowhere (1992)
9. The Verve: A Storm in Heaven (1993)
10. Swervedriver: Mezcal Head (1993)

Honourable mentions to the following, all of which were in contention (or almost) for spots 9-10 above:
Able Tasmans: Hey Spinner! (1990)
Bailter Space: Vortura (1994)
The Bats: Fear of God (1991)
Buddha on the Moon: Stratospheric (1997)
Chapterhouse: Whirlpool (1991)
The Clean: Vehicle (1990)
Dredg: Leitmotif (1999)
Kyuss: Welcome to Sky Valley (1994)
Jimmy Eat World: Clarity (1999)
Opeth: Orchid (1995)
Orphaned Land: Sahara (1994)
Passengers: Original Soundtrack 1 (1995)
Refused: The Shape of Punk to Come (1998)

Either I need to listen to more music from 1996, or it was a comparatively lean year.

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Carlotta Valdez, Terminal Annex, and Old Hat are where it's at. And Sad Sweetheart of the Rodeo off King James Version.
Harvey Danger have got to be one of the bands most unfairly discarded as a one hit wonder, because they actually made a really consistent body of work. Totally agree with you singling out "Old Hat" in particular; I'd probably rate that as their best song.
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Old 10-12-2013, 03:28 AM   #23
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My favorites:

Depeche Mode -- Violator (1990)
U2 -- Achtung Baby (1991)
Arrested Development -- 3 Years, 5 Months, and 2 Days in the Life of... (1992)
Björk -- Debut (1993)
Juliana Hatfield Three -- Become What You Are (1993)
Sting -- Ten Summoner's Tales (1993)
Depeche Mode -- Songs of Faith and Devotion (1993)
Counting Crows -- August and Everything After (1993)
Stone Roses -- Second Coming (1994)
Counting Crows -- Recovering the Satellites (1996)

Others: Sinéad O'Connor -- I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got (1990), The La's (1990), R.E.M. -- Automatic For The People (1992), Björk -- Post (1995)
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Old 10-12-2013, 03:39 AM   #24
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Arrested Development -- 3 Years, 5 Months, and 2 Days in the Life of... (1992)
Sting -- Ten Summoner's Tales (1993)
Sinéad O'Connor -- I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got (1990)
Nice!
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Old 10-12-2013, 05:43 PM   #25
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This doesn't represent the quality of the decade very well. If you take the top 40 alone into account, the first five years of the decade were shockingly bold, certainly. Tracks like Loser and She Don't Use Jelly got radio play. It was a strange time. The latter part of the decade is full of fresh, exciting rock music though. The seeds for a number of genres, including post rock, were planted around that time. Some of the purest, best indie rock was coming out in 96 and beyond. Hip hop was in its golden era (94-96). Artists like Beck, Ween and Super Furry Animals were making joyous, funny, strange music. If you dig a little, the late 90s were fantastic. 99 in particular is a favorite year of mine. Of course, I also disagree that Baby One More Time is anything less than a great pop song. It's also a world apart from a lot of rock music being released at the time.
I appreciate your thoughts and music choices listed BUT I have zero interest in anything hip- hop or rap related. Way too much sexism towards women, violence , racism , use of the "N" word and general excessive profanity for my tastes.

Although I don't mind Beck, Furry Animals and Ween. They miss the heavy distortion and angst that so endeared me to the first half of the 90's. Heavy chords just exude a power over me and fill me with primal energy and a feeling of being "Alive"!!

Nine Inch Nails, Tool, and some if the break- beat stuff was cool ie The Chemical Brothers, Prodigy also Daft Punk.

The early 90's music is the one that gets most of the attention and rightly so. The alt movement was fresh and exciting then.

Cheers.
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Old 10-12-2013, 08:13 PM   #26
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This doesn't represent the quality of the decade very well. If you take the top 40 alone into account, the first five years of the decade were shockingly bold, certainly. Tracks like Loser and She Don't Use Jelly got radio play. It was a strange time.

The latter part of the decade is full of fresh, exciting rock music though. The seeds for a number of genres, including post rock, were planted around that time. Some of the purest, best indie rock was coming out in 96 and beyond. Hip hop was in its golden era (94-96). Artists like Beck, Ween and Super Furry Animals were making joyous, funny, strange music. If you dig a little, the late 90s were fantastic. 99 in particular is a favorite year of mine.
I'm sure I'm not alone in thinking you're totally on-point here.


(one album per artist)

1. Achtung Baby
2. Pavement - Wowee Zowee
3. Sugar - Copper Blue
4. Afghan Whigs - Black Love
5. Liz Phair - Whip-Smart
6. Radiohead - The Bends
7. R.E.M. - New Adventures In Hi-Fi
8. Peter Gabriel - Us
9. Saint Etienne - Good Humor
10. The Jesus And Mary Chain - Stoned & Dethroned
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Old 10-12-2013, 08:24 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Mount Temple View Post
I appreciate your thoughts and music choices listed BUT I have zero interest in anything hip- hop or rap related. Way too much sexism towards women, violence , racism , use of the "N" word and general excessive profanity for my tastes.

Although I don't mind Beck, Furry Animals and Ween. They miss the heavy distortion and angst that so endeared me to the first half of the 90's. Heavy chords just exude a power over me and fill me with primal energy and a feeling of being "Alive"!!

Nine Inch Nails, Tool, and some if the break- beat stuff was cool ie The Chemical Brothers, Prodigy also Daft Punk.
It seems a bit hypocritical to toss aside the entire genre of hip-hop with labels like "sexist towards women" and "violent" and complaints of "excessive profanity" while in the same breath praising the band Nine Inch Nails whose most famous song features the chorus "I WANT TO FUCK YOU LIKE AN ANIMAL."

And I'm a big fan of those first two NIN albums.

Oh, and Baby One More Time is the god damned jam.
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Old 10-12-2013, 08:25 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by lazarus View Post
I'm sure I'm not alone in thinking you're totally on-point here.


(one album per artist)

1. Achtung Baby
2. Pavement - Wowee Zowee
3. Sugar - Copper Blue
4. Afghan Whigs - Black Love
5. Liz Phair - Whip-Smart
6. Radiohead - The Bends
7. R.E.M. - New Adventures In Hi-Fi
8. Peter Gabriel - Us
9. Saint Etienne - Good Humor
10. The Jesus And Mary Chain - Stoned & Dethroned
SUGAR - If I Can't Change Your Mind - YouTube

I'm so in love with this song right now.
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Old 10-12-2013, 08:34 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by GirlsAloudFan View Post
It seems a bit hypocritical to toss aside the entire genre of hip-hop with labels like "sexist towards women" and "violent" and complaints of "excessive profanity" while in the same breath praising the band Nine Inch Nails whose most famous song features the chorus "I WANT TO FUCK YOU LIKE AN ANIMAL."
I'm well beyond the point of arguing with people convinced that 30 years of music in one genre is all equally misogynistic.

He should go to hip hop purists though so we can finish that thread up.
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Old 10-12-2013, 11:00 PM   #30
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1. The Flaming Lips - The Soft Bulletin
2. Radiohead - Ok Computer
3. Neutral Milk Hotel - In The Aeroplane Over The Sea
4. Fugazi - Red Medicine
5. U2 - Achtung Baby
6. Built to Spill - Perfect From Now On
7. Modest Mouse - Lonesome Crowded West
8. Talk Talk - Laughing Stock
9. R.E.M. - Automatic for the People
10. Tom Waits - Mule Variations
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