Ok Pet Owners Do you have Insurance - Page 4 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Lemonade Stand
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-25-2012, 04:05 PM   #46
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 06:47 AM
weird. it almost looks as if you caught them mid movement or something. As if they're just about to sit down. It also makes them look timid, whereas yours looks regal
__________________

__________________
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 04:09 PM   #47
Blue Crack Addict
 
Liesje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the dog house
Posts: 19,557
Local Time: 06:47 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Turkey View Post
No way. Nice lookin dogs! I really like the middle one. Interesting colours
Thanks! The middle and the third are both sable colored. It's actually the dominant color pattern. Pan (the middle dog) is pretty dark though, but not uncommon for working line German Shepherds. He started out blonde though! From this:


to this:
__________________

__________________
Liesje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 04:10 PM   #48
Blue Crack Addict
 
Liesje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the dog house
Posts: 19,557
Local Time: 06:47 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Turkey View Post
weird. it almost looks as if you caught them mid movement or something. As if they're just about to sit down. It also makes them look timid, whereas yours looks regal
That's another problem with those lines. They are generally timid and skittish. One in particular at that show (not picture) was belly crawling half the time and showing avoidance of the handler. My dog on the other hand was doing his first show in over a year and loved it! He thinks he is the shit, which is how a German Shepherd should be. He might be a little too self-absorbed though!
__________________
Liesje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 04:19 PM   #49
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 06:47 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liesje View Post
Thanks! The middle and the third are both sable colored. It's actually the dominant color pattern. Pan (the middle dog) is pretty dark though, but not uncommon for working line German Shepherds. He started out blonde though! From this:


to this:
awww. Looks like a little teddy bear. i like his bad ass arm wraps too
__________________
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 04:36 PM   #50
Acrobat
 
ladyfreckles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 402
Local Time: 04:47 AM
My dog has a problem with rear angulation and he doesn't even look like that. Liesje your dogs are beautiful and I so wish I had gone with one of your breeders (I thought so hard about it, too).

No frog legs here, though he isn't without faults.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Liesje View Post
Yes


NO! *shudder*
*triple shudder*
__________________
ladyfreckles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 05:04 PM   #51
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 06:47 AM
Yours is a cutie too. All frolicking and such
__________________
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 05:31 PM   #52
Acrobat
 
ladyfreckles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 402
Local Time: 04:47 AM
That's because he hates standing still. Puppies.
__________________
ladyfreckles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 06:14 PM   #53
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,271
Local Time: 06:47 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Turkey View Post
We briefly touched on this a while back, but what are everyone's thoughts on the genetic and physical shaping, to the detriment of the animal, of breeds through selective breeding. I'm thinking more along the lines of bulldogs, or pugs, etc... animals that almost certainly live uncomfortable lives due to their exaggerated features. There was a time when I wanted to own a bulldog, but recently, I'm finding myself not wanting to contribute to that sort of behaviour. Thoughts?
My best friend grew up with two purebred Great Danes. Her father, quite an odd man, always insisted on getting the LARGEST possible Great Dane. To the point that one of them was imported from Poland, where apparently it's quite common to constantly breed the largest specimens. In any event, both dogs died at 7 from heart attacks. Now that's not necessarily super young for the breed (generally they live about 8-9 years) but each time the vet told them that it was because the dog was simply far too large for his heart and that as the breed was bred to be bigger physically, the hearts didn't catch up. So they'll give out much earlier in life.

Talk about cruel.
__________________
anitram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 06:59 PM   #54
Acrobat
 
ladyfreckles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 402
Local Time: 04:47 AM
That is cruel. It's as cruel as the people who get dogs and then let these dogs get obese because they can't be bothered to exercise them and didn't realize that a lab needs more exercise than 30 minutes a day. Then joint problems, heart problems, the whole 9 yards...
__________________
ladyfreckles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 07:49 PM   #55
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 06:47 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by anitram View Post
My best friend grew up with two purebred Great Danes. Her father, quite an odd man, always insisted on getting the LARGEST possible Great Dane. To the point that one of them was imported from Poland, where apparently it's quite common to constantly breed the largest specimens. In any event, both dogs died at 7 from heart attacks. Now that's not necessarily super young for the breed (generally they live about 8-9 years) but each time the vet told them that it was because the dog was simply far too large for his heart and that as the breed was bred to be bigger physically, the hearts didn't catch up. So they'll give out much earlier in life.

Talk about cruel.
That's so shitty.
I wanted a Irish Wolfhound for a while until I learned they only live 6 years or so. I'm assuming it's due to the same reasons. People suck sometimes
__________________
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 11:08 PM   #56
Blue Crack Addict
 
Liesje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the dog house
Posts: 19,557
Local Time: 06:47 AM
Yeah that's my biggest hangup with the "giant" breeds, they really are just TOO large. I'm interested in Saint Bernards (for several years down the road) and haven't looked into them much yet but wonder about the sheer size. People are that way about GSDs too, always want the biggest and the tallest. To me a correct sized GSD is a medium-large sized dog. My males are not huge but I do not think they look feminine or puny. Pan is 68lbs and Nikon is 71lbs. With all the sports and working competition we do, it's just unfair to expect a huge dog to be able to do that training safely and maintain a healthy condition throughout their life. I still worry about Pan doing flyball, but right now I'm keeping him lean and he's not as well-boned as Nikon so there isn't any extra anything on him, plus I spent weeks at home refining his box turn so that he turns safely as far as the impact on his shoulders. Also I have this thing where I don't like working dogs that I can't lift and carry in an emergency. It sounds strange but if I'm training and working a dog to be my partner and protector in some potentially dangerous situations then I need to be able to get him to safety if he gets injured. The German Shepherd is a perfect breed for me because of the versatility as far as conformation. The double coat makes them workable in extreme high and low temps, they are a good size for being very athletic and powerful yet not bulky. I like tails and I like erect ears which they have naturally. They are a deeper chested breed which unfortunately makes them prone to bloat.
__________________
Liesje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 11:09 PM   #57
Blue Crack Addict
 
Reggo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 26,990
Local Time: 05:47 AM
We had a Great Dane for a while, and she was a riot. the neighbours on one side kept losing very very nice leather soccer balls over the fence and never getting them back, cause she could pop them with one bite. The neighbours on the other side were jerkasses who liked to make her jump up over 6 feet to look over the fence. My dad made us get rid of her and I never really understood why. But she lived out the rest of her life (I assume) on the farm that the people who bought her from us owned.
__________________
Reggo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2012, 10:51 PM   #58
The Fly
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: end of the yellow brick road.
Posts: 166
Local Time: 04:47 AM
Another problem with giant breeds, is that when they are puppies, a lot of people are unfortunately misinformed when it comes to nutrition, and will put them on a growth formula that they pick up at the store. Unfortunately, unless you get a giant breed growth formula, you run into the problem with issues such as osteoarthritis, because they're actually growing TOO fast for the kind of body that they have. A friend of mine used to breed danes, and always has one. Her current one is 7, and he's the dumbest dog you'd meet, but also the sweetest.

Not only do you have issues with people breeding for just color or conformation, and usually inbreeding at that, some breeders don't test for genetic disorders. For example, dobermans are known to be predisposed genetically to von Willebrand's disease, which is a clotting disorder. They lack the von Willebrand's factor, which, if you don't have one factor in the clotting cascade, you don't clot correctly. It's a problem, especially if it's unknown if the dog has it and goes in for surgery, or gets injured.

If you do want to buy from a breeder, make sure the dogs have had the appropriate testing, and NOT just for hip dysplasia (that test in and of itself is quite painful for the dog. OFA has a good list of different tests that are recommended for certain breeds.

Link : Orthopedic Foundation for Animals

I'll get off the soap box now and get back to studying my veterinary science notes, followed by hematology (fun fun)

/L
__________________
notsomadLisa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 09:26 AM   #59
Blue Crack Addict
 
Liesje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the dog house
Posts: 19,557
Local Time: 06:47 AM
I'm all about testing breeding dogs BUT at least in my breed there's a big issue right now with people substituting testing (often testing which can be inconclusive or just plain wrong, like the DM tests) for actual knowledge about bloodlines and health. Personally I'm going to trust an experienced breeder who has never seen DM in their lines for decades over an inexperienced breeder that is basing their breeding decisions on a test that can be false positive or false negative. To be honest when I see a breeder's web page and the breeding dogs have a dozen different health test/certs under their name I wonder about the breeder. You cannot just run every OFA test under the sun and rely on that for sound, healthy dogs, that is something that comes with decades of experience owning and breeding the bloodlines.

It's really important to know which genetic health disorders plague one's breed of choice and understand how the tests work and what they really prove/disprove. For a German Shepherd dog I'm mainly interested in OFA, PennHIP, OVC, or a-stamp hips and elbows and that's about it. I used to think highly of the DM test but recent findings have me doubting it and I've decided not to test my dog at this time. I don't really need any of the other tests because they do not substitute for knowledge about the health and longevity of the bloodlines, the healthy of the progeny, and the physical working abilities of the bloodlines. That, and I actually value temperament over health but that's another debate.

Pelvic x-rays don't have to be painful. The PennHIP procedure sounds like it is but I prefer OFA or a-stamp for my dogs and a lot of people have it done without any sedative and the dog is just fine. None of my dogs had any problems getting pelvic x-rays. I do it at least twice because I prelim at 6 months and read the films myself. Then I repeat when the dog is more mature to get an OFA or a-stamp certificate which is required for the German Shepherd breed survey (elbows too).
__________________
Liesje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 12:11 PM   #60
Rock n' Roll Doggie
ALL ACCESS
 
Justin24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Mateo
Posts: 6,716
Local Time: 04:47 AM
Looking at Pet insurance options, might just opt with the car insurance option.
__________________

__________________
Justin24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com