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Old 10-03-2011, 11:22 AM   #961
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Can anyone recommend a good probiotic or similar product that can be used long term?

I've had ongoing diarrhea problems with my dog and been to the vet twice for it. Two rounds of two antibiotics each time, plus Fortiflora from the vet helped, but I'm not inclined to go through yet another round of antibiotics. My dog is tiny, only 5 pounds, and almost 14 years old now, so the less I have to put her through, the better.

Thanks for any suggestions you might have!
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:49 PM   #962
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My friend gives her dog one regularly, I'll ask what it is. I know it's not cheap, but he's 88lbs so yeah!
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Old 10-04-2011, 04:17 PM   #963
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My friend swears by this (scroll down)
Pet Probiotics | Probiotics for Dogs & Cats
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Old 10-04-2011, 10:41 PM   #964
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Originally Posted by Liesje View Post
My friend swears by this (scroll down)
Pet Probiotics | Probiotics for Dogs & Cats
Thanks Lies!
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Old 10-05-2011, 02:07 PM   #965
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I've also heard you can just give a plain probiotic type yogurt as long as the dog tolerates it. I used to get a tub of plain yogurt and drop a dollop in Kenya's bowl when she needed probiotics.
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Old 10-06-2011, 11:41 PM   #966
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I'm going out of town this weekend and had to board my dog at the vet's for the first time. He looked so sad when I left him there that I felt really bad. Ever since we've had him, he hates it every time he has to be in a crate and now he has to be in a slightly larger one for most of the weekend. I hope he doesn't freak out.
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Old 10-11-2011, 11:47 AM   #967
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Well, it turns out he tried to bite everyone at the vet's office. They gave him sedatives every day.
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Old 10-11-2011, 12:48 PM   #968
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oh poor thing! sounds like he was really upset!

i took my golden retriever to the vets the other day for her annual vaccines, and she went absolutely hyper she was so stressed bless her! she didn't get aggressive but she ran to the door and just kept doing her "speedy tricks" (spin, little beg, spin, big beg, spin) which she does at our front door when she's really excited when i tell her we're going to go "walkies" - she was absolutely desperate to go out, poor girl, and was trying her best to persuade me to open the consulting room door and let her out! the vet was kind though and just crouched down on the floor by the door to give her the injections and she was a good girl for him...

is there a kennels which isn't at the vets? maybe he associates it with an unpleasant vet experience? our dog gets very excited now when we take her to the kennels - it's just a very small family-run business at a local breeders, with only about 12 spaces, and the dogs have very spacious individual pens with an outside and inside section, and get walked 3 times a day - she loves the guy - she does her happy dance when she sees him (she is soooooo disloyal lol) - it's a bit embarrassing - she should be pining for us LOL!! she is always extremely excited when we fetch her though, but it is reassuring to know that she is happy going there...
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Old 10-11-2011, 03:47 PM   #969
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Poor dog!

I'm super-de-duper picky about where I board my dogs. For one I have multiple intact male German Shepherd dogs that are trained in bitework/protection work. They're actually quite lovable and social but a lot of places just do not allow intact dogs period, or dogs with that type of training. I'm also really picky about what vaccinations my dogs get so that rules out a lot of boarding kennels that require vaccinations I do not use. I'm really lucky to have found a friend that boards my dogs at her farm for a very good price. She keeps them happy and safe, even sent me a video last time I was gone. I have my sister come over and pet-sit if it's just for a weekend, but my dog boarding friend actually has a more secure yard than we do so I feel better bringing them there for longer stays. She is certified in pet first aid and CPR and she has her own insurance that covers her dog boarding.

I never board at the vet because the dogs have to soil in their kennels and I won't allow that (my friend lets them out several times a day often for hours if it's nice out and even gets up at night to let them out). At the vet hospital there are only staff there during business hours and the dogs are only let out twice day. I would hate having my dog be forced to soil in his kennel.
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Old 10-11-2011, 04:48 PM   #970
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The vet staff let him out into a dog run to use the bathroom but I don't know how often they did that. He really had to go when we picked him up at 8:00 this morning, so I think it had been a while. The vet told us that my dog was scared of him the whole time, but he finally let one of the staff members pet him last night. I think he knows that the vet is the one who gives him shots. We apologized for his bad behavior, but the vet said that he was just scared and that's what happens sometimes. I was really surprised that he was actually biting people, though.

If we ever have to board him again, I might look into other boarders to see how they are. My dog is really energetic and crafty, so not just anyone can handle him, and there's no way an older person could do it (that's why we didn't ask Grandma to watch him); and the vet only charged $50 to keep him from Thursday to Tuesday morning, and I'm sure it would cost more somewhere else, but it would be worth it if it was a less stressful environment. It's very rare for the whole family to be gone at the same time (my mom hates to travel), so hopefully we won't have to worry about this again for a long time.

It was so funny, when we got there to pick him up, he saw us through the receptionist's window and tried to climb over her desk to get to us.
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Old 11-26-2011, 06:04 AM   #971
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have you guys heard about Benton/Fenton?

http://youtu.be/3GRSbr0EYYU
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Old 12-02-2011, 05:42 PM   #972
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New York Times, Dec. 1
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The call came into the behavior specialists here from a doctor in Afghanistan. His patient had just been through a firefight and now was cowering under a cot, refusing to come out.

Apparently even the chew toys hadn’t worked.

Post-traumatic stress disorder, thought Dr. Walter F. Burghardt Jr., chief of behavioral medicine at the Daniel E. Holland Military Working Dog Hospital at Lackland Air Force Base. Specifically, canine PTSD.

If anyone needed evidence of the frontline role played by dogs in war these days, here is the latest: the four-legged, wet-nosed troops used to sniff out mines, track down enemy fighters and clear buildings are struggling with the mental strains of combat nearly as much as their human counterparts. By some estimates, more than 5% of the approximately 650 military dogs deployed by American combat forces are developing canine PTSD. Of those, about half are likely to be retired from service, Dr. Burghardt said.

Though veterinarians have long diagnosed behavioral problems in animals, the concept of canine PTSD is only about 18 months old, and still being debated. But it has gained vogue among military veterinarians, who have been seeing patterns of troubling behavior among dogs exposed to explosions, gunfire and other combat-related violence in Iraq and Afghanistan. Like humans with the analogous disorder, different dogs show different symptoms. Some become hyper-vigilant. Others avoid buildings or work areas that they had previously been comfortable in. Some undergo sharp changes in temperament, becoming unusually aggressive with their handlers, or clingy and timid. Most crucially, many stop doing the tasks they were trained to perform. “If the dog is trained to find improvised explosives and it looks like it’s working, but isn’t, it’s not just the dog that’s at risk,” Dr. Burghardt said. “This is a human health issue as well.”

That the military is taking a serious interest in canine PTSD underscores the importance of working dogs in the current wars. Once used primarily as furry sentries, military dogs—most are German shepherds, followed by Belgian Malinois and Labrador retrievers—have branched out into an array of specialized tasks. They are widely considered the most effective tools for detecting the improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, frequently used in Afghanistan. Typically made from fertilizer and chemicals, and containing little or no metal, those buried bombs can be nearly impossible to find with standard mine-sweeping instruments. In the past three years, IEDs have become the major cause of casualties in Afghanistan. The Marine Corps also has begun using specially trained dogs to track Taliban fighters and bomb-makers. And Special Operations commandos train their own dogs to accompany elite teams on secret missions like the Navy SEAL raid that led to the killing of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. Across all the forces, more than 50 military dogs have been killed since 2005. The number of working dogs on active duty has risen to 2700, from 1800 in 2001, and the training school headquartered here at Lackland [San Antonio] has gotten busy, preparing about 500 dogs a year. So has the Holland hospital, the Pentagon’s canine version of Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

Dr. Burghardt, a lanky 59-year-old who retired last year from the Air Force as a colonel, rarely sees his PTSD patients in the flesh. Consultations with veterinarians in the field are generally done by phone, e-mail or Skype, and often involve video documentation. In a series of videos that Dr. Burghardt uses to train veterinarians to spot canine PTSD, one shepherd barks wildly at the sound of gunfire that it had once tolerated in silence. Another can be seen confidently inspecting the interior of cars but then refusing to go inside a bus or a building. Another sits listlessly on a barrier wall, then after finally responding to its handler’s summons, runs away from a group of Afghan soldiers. In each case, Dr. Burghardt theorizes, the dogs were using an object, vehicle or person as a “cue” for some violence they had witnessed. “If you want to put doggy thoughts into their heads,” he said, “the dog is thinking: when I see this kind of individual, things go boom, and I’m distressed.”

Treatment can be tricky. Since the patient cannot explain what is wrong, veterinarians and handlers must make educated guesses about the traumatizing events. Care can be as simple as taking a dog off patrol and giving it lots of exercise, playtime and gentle obedience training. More serious cases will receive what Dr. Burghardt calls “desensitization counterconditioning,” which entails exposing the dog at a safe distance to a sight or sound that might set off a reaction—a gunshot, a loud bang or a vehicle, for instance. If the dog does not react, it is rewarded, and the trigger—“the spider in a glass box,” Dr. Burghardt calls it—is moved progressively closer. Gina, a shepherd with PTSD who was the subject of news articles last year, was successfully treated with desensitization and has been cleared to deploy again, said Tech. Sgt. Amanda Callahan, a spokeswoman at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado. Some dogs are also treated with the same medications used to fight panic attacks in humans. Dr. Burghardt asserts that medications seem particularly effective when administered soon after traumatizing events. The Labrador retriever that cowered under a cot after a firefight, for instance, was given Xanax, an anti-anxiety drug, and within days was working well again.

Dogs that do not recover quickly are returned to their home bases for longer-term treatment. But if they continue to show symptoms after three months, they are usually retired or transferred to different duties, Dr. Burghardt said.

As with humans, there is much debate about treatment, with little research yet to guide veterinarians. Lee Charles Kelley, a dog trainer who writes a blog for Psychology Today called “My Puppy, My Self,” says medications should be used only as a stopgap. “We don’t even know how they work in people,” he said. In the civilian dog world, a growing number of animal behaviorists seem to be endorsing the concept of canine PTSD, saying it also affects household pets who experience car accidents and even less traumatic events. Dr. Nicholas H. Dodman, director of the animal behavior clinic at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, said he had written about and treated dogs with PTSD-like symptoms for years—but did not call it PTSD until recently. Asked if the disorder could be cured, Dr. Dodman said probably not. “It is more management,” he said. “Dogs never forget.”
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Old 12-02-2011, 11:19 PM   #973
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I really don't doubt this^. Dogs are much more evolved and in tune with human emotions than most people think. How incredibly sad.

I'm glad this thread was brought back up though. This morning down a rural road that runs next to the Everglades, I saw a German shepherd narrowly miss a speeding car. This area is known for high speeds (I call it our autobahn) and it is never patrolled by cops so cars constant go in excess of 90 mph. There is about a 50 foot stretch where there is some trailer park on the side. I constantly see kids by the side of the road and wonder what the hell the parents are doing!
Anyway, the two cars in front of me were going at least 80 in this stretch (limit is 45) when the shep wandered onto the road. It looked like he might have clipped one of his legs by a fraction of an inch before quickly darting away, tail between his legs. I wanted to stop, but it looked like someone in the community saw what happened anyway.
I sure hope the pup is all right with little more than some tire burn on his leg, and hopefully he'll keep from the road from now on. I was upset with myself all morning for not stopping, but I probably would have been rear-ended.
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Old 02-16-2012, 02:08 AM   #974
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I was just glancing through a slideshow of selected paintings from the Bonhams Dogs in Show & Field Fine Art Auction, which runs concurrently with the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. They're mostly 19th-century English paintings--some nice images of terriers and setters in there. What caught my eye was an interesting sequence of images of pugs--interesting because, taken together, they show how rapidly the breed's appearance changed in response to Victorian preferences for neoteny (maintenance of a juvenile look into adulthood) and perhaps parallel developments in China, which was still occasionally a source of breeding stock. Obviously it's more interesting if you happen to like pugs , but I always find this sort of pre-photographic documentation of breed development pretty cool.


early 19th century (1802); this one looks very much like some 18th-cen. images I'd seen before, they were much taller dogs at the time:



mid 19th century (1850); note how much the puppies resemble present-day adult pugs:



late 19th century (no exact date); this one kinda makes me wish breeders had settled on this look instead! Healthier muzzle shape too...
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Old 02-19-2012, 06:49 PM   #975
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ABC News, Feb. 14
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Television is going to the dogs in San Diego with DOGTV, a new 24-hour channel for pooches that is meant to keep your dog company while you are gone. According to the people behind the channel, the combination of devouring programming and pet treats will be “a confident, happy dog who’s less likely to develop stress, separation anxiety or other related problems.” DOGTV, which launched on Cox and Time Warner digital cable systems in San Diego this week, is intended for dogs that are left at home during the day.
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Sample programming includes a video of dogs playing with balls to give your pet stimulation, dogs sleeping to help soothe them, and one has a dizzying dogs-eye view out the car window.

Dr. Katherine Houpt, professor of animal behavior at Cornell University, said the secret is likely in the audio, not the video. “People have looked at TV and dogs in kennels and they didn’t pay a whole lot of attention to it. While it’s a nice idea, I don’t think it’s going to be that successful,” Houpt told ABC News. “I’ve actually found that cats seem to be more interested in television...[Dogs] probably pay more attention to the sound, but the main thing is dogs probably don’t want to be entertained while you’re away. What dogs do mostly during the day when you’re not around is sleep.” Houpt said that while dogs do experience loneliness and separation anxiety, if you’re a dog owner, it is best to play soft music and create a dark environment so the dog feels secure when you are not at home.
DOGTV Trailer: "Stimulation"
DOGTV Trailer: "Relaxation"
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