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Old 10-18-2009, 02:54 AM   #16
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?
2) What political side did your family take?


My parents were civil rights activists, as were most of their longtime friends in Mississippi where I grew up; so, they definitely weren't apathetic. In general, people of that background tend strongly Democratic, at least at the national level--that being where their strongest support in Washington has come from since the '60s--and my parents were no exception. As far as state and local politics, that's a bit more variable, particularly since MS is very much the kind of place where most towns are effectively one-party-only, meaning that your electoral choices typically boil down to a weary "Well, who's the least corrupt of this batch" rather than ideologically meaningful distinctions. (And in either party's case, at the local level, you're going to be locking horns with them all the way on things like civil rights issues anyway.)

My parents did despise the sort of petty tribalisms that depressingly often characterize US political discourse, so there weren't any hair-trigger rants about 'Damn Republicans this, damn conservatives that' or whatever. In general, their approach to discussing political issues with me and my siblings (usually race, poverty, or foreign policy issues, those being their major interests) was to explain the problem at hand in simple language, some pros and cons of the various proposals out there for addressing it in equally simple language, then we'd say what we thought about it and the discussion would go from there. My father was both a much bigger talker and a much more passionate person (on everything, not just politics) than my mother was, so in practice these tended to be conversations between him and us kids, with my mother only occasionally interjecting to say "I think that's a little extreme, David," which always perked our ears up, because that meant she was about to go through and very clinically cross-examine all the overreaches and generalizations and oversights in his argument, which was usually quite entertaining. In actuality they held very similar political views, so this was mostly a difference of personality and intellectual style.


3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?
4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?


From high school(s), I can recall one teacher who went on pro-life rants in class, one teacher who went on anti-feminist rants in class (sneering about the "dumb broads" of N.O.W. etc.), and one teacher who went on Israel-can-do-no-wrong rants in class. That's about it; I had little awareness of the political views of any of my high school teachers beyond that, and none at all from elementary or junior high that I can recall. In college I had one preachy prof who was a conservative of the curmudgeonly Allan Bloom type, and one hyperpartisan liberal professor who rather than stating his views openly, employed the annoying and infantilizing tactic of "planting" students from his other classes in our class to go off on scripted rants, which was supposed to provoke discussion (this was a very large lecture-based class, which was how he could get away with it). Those two were the only grandstanders, though as Axver touched on, by the time you're in college (and especially if you're majoring in a highly politically salient field), you're almost inevitably going to discern at least a vague idea of what your professors' basic political leanings are, based on their choices of readings, the things which spring to mind for them as illustrations of some principle or another, stuff like that.

Where I teach, you'll be quite poorly regarded by your colleagues, particularly the full-time tenured/tenure-track ones, if you're known for partisan grandstanding in class. There's no rule against it though, so generally it becomes an administrative issue only if your student evaluations recurrently suggest that you're wasting lots of instructional time on irrelevant indulgence in sharing your own opinions.


5) What has your political education left you?

Not sure I really understand the question...? I'd consider myself a moderate liberal overall. Like my parents, I despise petty tribalism in politics, and consider much of what passes for 'political discourse' in the US to be a (mutually) worthless, whiny, hot-air-blowing waste of time.


6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?

'Continuation of my education' would be an overstatement. I come here mostly for social pleasures; it's fun and thought-provoking to read and discuss political, social and cultural issues with a group of smart, interesting and aware people. In real life, I'm not a big talker at all (I'm not really here either, but often closer to it), and I've always been quicker on the draw in writing than in speech, so it's an added attraction for me that in this case, the interchange is taking place through a reading/writing based medium.
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Old 10-19-2009, 07:54 PM   #17
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic? I think it's more like I raised myself politically. They weren't apathetic though. I do think that many of my family dynamics influenced my political views, especially my views about women's issues

2) What political side did your family take? My mother is more religious and more liberal-my father not as religious and more conservative. She's a Democrat, he's a Republican

3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics? It was just school, I never noticed. Went to all of my schooling in the same "liberal" state I grew up in and still live in.

4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different? I went to a secular college for two years and transferred to a Catholic one. Never noticed any difference in teaching or professors.

5) What has your political education left you? cynical

6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education? I just enjoy reading a small sample of what some people think and think about-sometimes. I don't participate in any similar online forum. As bad as it can get between people in FYM I've seen and observed much worse in other sections of Interference, so from that point of view I prefer it.
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:27 PM   #18
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?

My grandfather was a true libertarian. He told me that FDR started the U.S. on the road to ruin.

2) What political side did your family take?

Questioning, my parents were always discussing and questioning politics.

3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides?

They tried, but I ignored them.

4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?

I kept my library card active.

5) What has your political education left you?

Liberty

6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?

I like to read other people's opinion and engage in civil debate.
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Old 10-19-2009, 10:19 PM   #19
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?
My parents always voted. My dad was vice-president of his union, so even as a very small child I was aware of elections. The first one I recall was Mondale v Regan, I was 7.

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2) What political side did your family take?
My Dad was a moderate Democrat. My Mom was a moderate Republican, and pro-choice. She has since become very, very conservative and while pro-choice would rather it be decided by the states.

Quote:
3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?
My hometown is pretty conservative, they wouldn't let my bio teachers teach evolution. Now my teachers were always very apolitical. Although, i do remember asking my water polo coach who she voted for in '92 and being suitably happy.

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4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?
I had one very left wing poli-sci prof, but it was never railing against Republicans, it was more theoretical. My Classics profs were all liberal I'm sure, but again not overtly political. Keep in mind though I attended from '95 to '99 so they were probably much happier with the leadership than from '01 to '08.

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5) What has your political education left you?
I'm much further left than my Dad or my Mom. I was always politically aware, and remember being angry i couldn't vote in '92. I worked on Clinton's '96 campaign, and wanted to work on Obama's. Honestly, what college taught me was to read up on the issues. Some of my favorite parts of college was the political discourse with my close friends, we were all across the political spectrum and because we were friends were never nasty with one another. I will say though that in the years since graduation the discourse has become more testy.

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6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?
Not education, but I do like the back and forth, and the fact that there are a wide spectrum of opinions, including Libertarians whom I find fascinating.
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Old 10-20-2009, 10:45 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Pearl View Post
I am curious about where everyone got their political views from. So here are some questions:

1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?
It wasn't discussed a lot. Maybe during elections etc, or when the occasional issue would come up, but most of my political education came on my own, after high school.

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Originally Posted by Pearl View Post
2) What political side did your family take?
My mom is a pretty traditional Democrat, most of her side of the family are typical "union Democrats", a little left economically, pretty right socially. My stepdad is an old-school small government conservative, and my dad is pretty conservative (he's very big on 2nd Amendment rights).

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3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?
I don't remember much of that in high school. I'm sure I had teachers who leaned left or right, but I don't recall them bringing it into the classroom.

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Originally Posted by Pearl View Post
4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?
I had a couple of profs who pretty clearly leaned left, but not to the point of them discouraging opposition the way you read about occasionally. I did have one who was pretty clearly a socialist (not a "You're a SOCIALIST!!![/Rush] socialist, a real one) and I'm not sure how receptive he'd have been to an openly conservative student, but I don't think there were any in the class. It was pretty common knowledge where he stood politically, so you knew going in.

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5) What has your political education left you?
Well, I'm definitely further left than anyone in my family. Reading is a wonderful thing, you learn a lot more vs. what gets spoonfed to you by the mainstream media (left OR right), and you need to read (and write) a lot to earn a philosophy degree

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6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?
I do. I'm very big on discourse, I like hearing/reading what both sides have to say. I find if you surround yourself with a bunch of people who think the same way you do discourse dies and people end up spouting a bunch of dogma without a lot of thought behind it. It's better when people challenge you...
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:31 AM   #21
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?
My mother was apathetic and probably a little liberal. My father was liberal until the Reagan Thatcher years and the communists in university gave him low marks for having negative opinions about Fidel Castro. He was also prevented from going on Archeological digs because of his politics. I was taught economics and politics so that being conservative becomes a default because we have as much government as we need or want in Canada. Though none of us are religious even if there is some respect for what religion philosophically can teach. BTW the learning now with my Dad is a two way street and is one of the best connections I have with him. Learning doesn't stop until you're dead.

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Originally Posted by Pearl View Post
2) What political side did your family take?
Most of the rest of my family are in South America and mostly left-wing. They get most of their points of view from TV media and read little books.

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Originally Posted by Pearl View Post
3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?
I only met one conservative teacher (accounting teacher). The rest were openly liberals and talked of their viewpoints as if no one disagreed. It started from Junior High and onward.

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4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?
2 open communists I met (Sociology - not a surprise, and Anthropology - not a surprise) and one I suspect (Business Ethics) based on his hilarious economic (hack) model he prepared and his finite pie assertions. He also marked the class on opinions of his San Francisco left-wing textbooks instead of testing our knowledge of the subject. You then would get low marks for putting your opinion (even if his ridiculous personal comments could be refuted) different than his. He would give you higher marks if you forcibly agreed with him but never the top marks if he marked you as conservative at the beginning. At least the communist sociology teacher marked you on knowledge of the subject only and not on opinions. This goes for the anthropology teacher as well. The anthropology class was interesting as global warming propaganda was starting to heat up then. I remember the refuted "hockey stick graph" being shown and students from third world countries openly showing their envy of the west and getting heated and wanting the west to "pay their dues". It was so nauseating to see students who hated conservatives and the west talk about their phony care for the poor but at the same time want cushy U.N. jobs. Philanthropy and self-interest are so when mixed together. That university experience made me libertarian for a brief period.

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5) What has your political education left you?
With a curiosity to devour more. I'm really enjoying digging into Leszek Kołakowski's "Main Currents of Marxism" at the moment. It's a long read but I think it will be worth it.

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Originally Posted by Pearl View Post
6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?
Sure. Most debates inform you at least of what other people think and their emotional reactions to certain debates and they can show weaknesses in your own opinions so you can work on them.
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Old 10-20-2009, 05:28 PM   #22
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?

my family was always politically engaged. i remember the 1988 election, and i remember getting excited when my mother said, loudly, "woah," when Lloyd Bentson slammed Dan Quayle with the now famous "you're no Jack Kennedy" comment. i remember how thrilling that was, in a weird way, because i could smell and sense the importance of politics. i was always into Geography/Social Studies/History as a child, and as i grew a bit older, politics and current events seemed to naturally flow into that. i was reading Newsweek cover-to-cover by Junior High -- and i remember finding it a bit of a challenge putting together the lurid details of the Anita Hill hearings, and i began to realize that there was a racial subtext beneath the veneer of sexuality. from the 1992 election on, i was something of a junkie. my addiction was helped along by friends who were equally political, as well as beginning to take Bono's every statement as gospel from about 1992 on.



2) What political side did your family take?

my parents are somewhat moderate, but more anti-GOP than anything. my mother is a Main Street republican who voted Reagan, Bush 1 in both '88 and '92, she then voted for Nader in '96 as a protest, but the coming of GWB scared the life out of her and she became possibly one of the most anti-Bush people i know. on a local level she remains a Republican, but once the Jesus crowd took over the GOP in the 1990s, she ran away and never looked back. she also thinks Palin is a monster. what scares her, and my father, most is ignorance and the celebration of "guts" or "character" or "instinct" over intelligence, knowledge, and logic. my father is probably more of a traditional New Deal Democrat, his parents being from good Swedish stock and they thought the anti-government hysteria peddled by the Right as little more than madness.

of course, on some issues, they've failed to walk the talk and have totally dropped the ball, but that's another issue.




3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?

in class, i'd have to say no. i remember politics being alluded to, but i feel like my teachers were fairly careful not to take specific sides in class. in high school i belonged to some politically active clubs, and that's when some teachers would show up to some of the debates we'd have and we'd see what their politics were. but in class, i'd have to say no.

wait, except for one math teacher who once said, "i find it ironic that the school is sponsoring a trip to see 'Schindler's List' when there's a Holocaust of millions of unborn babies every year."

that was offensive.



4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?


no stereotypical radical left-wing professors. they were all too smart to be so obvious. i do remember many classes being concerned with race, class, and gender, but the political action part of this was never really discussed. you could logically deduce that this was a liberal viewpoint, but to me it just seemed an informed viewpoint. a classical liberal arts education helps you to understand thought systems, and how said systems operate and perpetuate their own existence. if you're concerned at all with, say, the plight of women or minorities or the poor, you understand very well how certain power structures replicate themselves using politics in order to guarantee their continued existence.

i can only remember one very pro-immigrant professor who ever seemed to go into actual politics, but this was in a class about American immigration, so it really didn't seem all that crazy. and he was almost unbearably nice, so no fire breathing there.



5) What has your political education left you?

disappointed in Democrats and aghast at most of the Republican party.



6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?


like Yolland, i'm more here for the personalities and the drama than to be actually informed on an issue. i enjoy hearing other viewpoints, and i enjoy reading about politics in other countries (though there is a huge American bias in here). many people make very good points, and there are certain posters i'll always read, but i really have lost a lot after the 2008 election. i feel like the adults are back in charge and we can breathe a bit easier now. there just seems to be less at stake and i correspondingly find discussions in here to be less contested than, say, 3 years ago. i still enjoy it, and it's occasionally interesting, but it's now more about the individuals than the issues.

it used to be a fascinating place when it came to conservative Christian posters. i'd never really been exposed to fundamentalist mindsets before, and there used to be many more of them in here. it was important, i think, to actually *read* thoughts like that, rather than just listen and get angry, because you can begin to appreciate that there are certain assumptions that we all have that we all do not share. it's digging deep to get to said assumptions that's the most interesting thing of all, to me.
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Old 10-20-2009, 07:59 PM   #23
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic? I just remember my father pointing out errors in a history book that seemed to take a leftist slant on things. I think he was mostly right.

2) What political side did your family take? Averagely conservative Irish Catholics.

3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics? I honestly can't recall any teacher openly preaching politics. I think this is to their credit - I was privileged to have some very good teachers. I do remember a science teacher expressing some mildly critical viewpoints with regard to trade unions that probably went a little outside of the curriculum. Teachers in Ireland seemed to be on strike a lot during the 1980s' so possibly he was dissociating himself from this. Frankly, I agreed with him.

4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different? I don't really remember any overtly political professors at college. I studied business, so I assume most were political conservatives, as business and economics professors tend to be, but there was no overt propagandising that I can recall.

5) What has your political education left you? With a deep and abiding dislike of far left and neo-'conservative' politics, and with a mistrust of globalism and neo-liberalism. I define myself politically, for the most part, in terms of the things I am against. I also hate drug dealers and stupid people. Basically, I am not interested in being bored by anyone with an IQ under 120. I am interested in advancing the interests of myself and my class, the middle class and deserving working class, and view Marxism as essentially correct in depicting society as class-based (albeit, wrong about everything else). I want to cut social welfare off, and cut loose the welfare moms and dads, the grifters, the wasters, the leeches and the ne'er do wells (including corporations that qualify for any of these categories). Also, I try to see the good in people and believe in people fulfilling themselves on all levels and not compromising. I want everyone to have the opportunities that I had, so that they, too, can waste them (Ok, this is starting to read like a bad self-help book).

6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education? I don't see it as a continuation of my education, as I already know I'm right. What I try to bring to the forum is a questioning attitude with regard to neo-'conservatism' and liberalism. And yet, I tend not to agree with the majority of the other right wing posters on FYM, and mostly feel alone here.
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Old 10-20-2009, 09:36 PM   #24
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?

Oddly, my family are probably a lot like Financeguy's. Catholic of Irish descent, temperamentally, not ideologically, conservative.

2) What political side did your family take?

Broadly conservative though culturally so. Our family historically voted for the Australian Labor Party until the 1950s Split. Some probably then followed the DLP off on its slow journey into the conservative camp of politics, and never came back.

3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?

Some did, some did not. The most overtly political comments I can recall were one primary school teacher who was convinced that Indonesia would invade Australia in the future, and another who took a very dim view of John Wayne owing to his position during the Cold War/McCarthyist era.

4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?

No.

5) What has your political education left you?

It has left me a social democrat. But for me political education and the reading of history are inseparable. The most I could say is that my views are considerably more nuanced than they were years ago. Extreme examples of dangerous stupid like the early-mid Bush era perhaps mask this fact... I know of a number of people online saying that they resented the hell out of GWB for making them feel like tinfoil hat people. I'm not particularly leftwing.

6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?

I see some political communities/threads/blogs online as those things, but not so much FYM. Its tendency is too far toward the tabloid for my taste. But its part of my daily rounds, so.
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Old 10-21-2009, 02:37 AM   #25
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?
2) What political side did your family take?
My mother and father raised me to become religious, but not conservative. They both vote Liberal (the main centre-right party in Australia), but my mother's a firm supporter of Obama, so I'm not really sure exactly where she stands, centre I suppose. Dad just votes Liberal because his mother forced him to when he was younger and he seems incapable of thinking any other way, I don't think he really cares. But a lot of other members of my family are very, very conservative. Alternatively, I have an aunt who's a pretty prominent far-left Green politician, so there's a bit of variety.

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3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?
I think the only thing I remember re: this in school was blatant racism and xenophobia, but that's not exactly out of the norm in a rural Australian school. Like when 9/11 occurred, the overwhelming majority thought the Americans deserved it, and when some friends and I were raising money for a local indigenous charity in year 12, I got a lot of very, very rude comments from people of different age groups. I fluttered between sides in my early teens. It was really only around when I was 17 that I started particularly identifying as left-wing, and I began to consider becoming atheist around that time - mostly out of disillusion of how other Protestants I knew acted, and things just sort of snowballed from there.

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4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?
I'm still sort of in that stage in my life, even though I'm not studying at the moment - but going to art school for a while, I was exposed to a really new breed of people that was hard to find from where I grew up, so it was quite liberating in a way. All my lecturers were left-wing to varying degrees, but radical rants were rare.

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5) What has your political education left you?
Not sure. I don't know, I'm surprised by how much politics have affected me, because I still feel most other people around my age just don't seem to give a shit. I have an interest in getting into politics to a larger degree, but haven't decided how I'd get all that together.

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6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?
I usually only come here to make one-liners.
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Old 10-21-2009, 07:33 AM   #26
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I usually only come here to make one-liners.
And quality ones at that...
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Old 10-24-2009, 03:29 PM   #27
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?
My family was not particularly political at all. I don't think we ever talked about politics at home. My family is not American--they are from Trinidad, so maybe they felt more disconnected from U.S. politics, I don't know. I remember liking Ronald Reagan as a kid, mainly because he was likable and charismatic. I had no real concept of his politics. I still have a warm feeling about Reagan today. He kind of reminds me of my grandpa.

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2) What political side did your family take?
None to speak of. Today though, I think they all lean left politically, though religiously most remain quite conservative (fundamentalist would be the better term, I guess). Ironically, with many very orthodox Seventh-day Adventists, they tend to be a more liberal politically (at least in certain key areas) whereas less fundamentalist Adventists tend to be more politically conservative. I suppose that's a broad generalization but I do know that among a lot of the people I went to school with who aren't particularly strict Adventists anymore, you'll hear them saying things like "America is a Christian nation" and so on. This is totally antithetical to old school Adventist theology which saw great danger in a Christianized government, mainly because we figured we would be targets for persecution from such a government because of our insistence on keeping Saturday rather than Sunday as the Sabbath.

That fear of "Sunday laws" being passed and ensuing persecution for those that refused to comply that I grew up with seems to be disappearing from my generation, which makes us less wary of exhortations for the Religious Right to "get the nation back to God" and makes them more comfortable with the Religious Right, which we actually do have a lot in common with otherwise. The church as a whole, in terms of it's official stance remains remarkably apolitical except for it's energetic involvement in religious liberty issues.

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3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?
Again mostly apolitical. I went to Adventist schools.

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4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?
Nothing really radical in college. I know I became more liberal in college but I wouldn't ascribe that to any particular professor's left-wing education.

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5) What has your political education left you?
I'm probably less left-wing than I appear to be. Often it's the attitude (and lately, what I veiw as the intellectual laziness and cheap shots of the right) that I find repugnant rather than the views themselves. Bush's advocacy of compassionate conservatism piqued my interest when he first ran for president, but then that never really panned out as far I could tell.

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6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?
I love the diversity of views here, and in that sense I do see it as a continuation of my education. My biggest fear is that the handful of right-leaning posters will leave--we've already lost quite a few it seems. As much as I wrangle with them, I believe they may be perhaps the most important posters in this forum. I do wish--and my apologies because I know there's no way to say this without being offensive, so just know I do love y'all--that more of the posts from the right were more intellectually rigorous and less retreads of whatever is the latest from Limbaugh and Beck et. al. It's been awhile since I've seen a post from the opposite of the political spectrum that made me say: "Wow. Okay. Let me think about that." Perhaps, that's my own arrogance though? After all, like Financeguy I pretty much think I'm right most of the time. But then I suspect most of us feel that way. . .
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Old 10-28-2009, 06:28 PM   #28
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I am curious about where everyone got their political views from. So here are some questions:

1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?

My parents were democrats. They did not raise me to be anyway in particular. They voted but were not engaged beyond that politically.

2) What political side did your family take?

Mostly democrat, more centrist.

3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?

My politics were shaped by debates around the dinner table. I loved to debate. I joined the debate team in 9th grade. I was the politician of the family. As a high school students I became the vice president of the state teen council here in MA. I was fascinated with the Kenendy family and spent more time that I care to admit into reading, studying, and writing about them. I attended a leadership conference in Washington, DC. I had the pleasure of meeting Senator Kennedy and Kerry on the capital steps and presented them each with an award. At that time I was introduced to Congressman Gerry Studds, a gay congressman from MA. I worked in his office three times a week through my Jr and Sr. years in high school. I was a case worker in the office. I worked on various local campaigns supporting mostly democratic candidates.

I went to Eastern Nazarene College. I never fit in politically. I was too liberal for the evangelicals. I loved being different, I loved the debates in history and politcal classes and I loved to take the opposite site of the majority on any issue even if I agreed with them. I worked on Gary Hart's run for the presidency. After Gary Hart, the only candidate that I liked over the next few years was Ross Perot. I loved that he may have shaken up the system even though he had is issues. Finally, John McCain in 2000 is probably the candidate that energized me the most.

4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?

My professors weer all RIGHT WING. I was a pain in their ass, and I started my own underground newspaper when I was censored in the student newspaper.


5) What has your political education left you?

I am conservative in matters of $$$ and military, and more liberal in the areas of social issues for example - gay marriage.

6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?

I have pretty much retired from this place. I poke in now and again. The last election and the level of debate was not like past elections and I have found that upon going back through the history in this forum, that there was intelligent diatribe in here. The reality is, I am much more focused on the real word with my job now. My children and my wife are front in center in my life right now, and they have to be because of the work schedule. I cannot commit to FYM the way I used to and I used to put hours into reading to debate the topics of the day. I miss it sometime, but I so hated the way I felt during the last election, that I do not think I will be participating the way I used to again.

One thing for certain, is that I do not believe I can change the world by participating in an internet forum. I do believe that back in the day, this place, helped shape me.
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Old 10-29-2009, 09:50 PM   #29
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1) How did you family raise you politically? Did they care or were they apathetic?

They were pretty apathetic or at least never talked about politics much. To be perfectly honest we never have discussed politics or religion much.

2) What political side did your family take?

I think my family is made up of democrats but again we never discuss it much.

3) Describe the politics of your formal education, from kindergarten through high school. Did anyone take sides? Did anyone, regardless of political views, openly preach their politics?

Politics never came up in school until Debate in high school. My teacher was liberal but there a range of views from my outgoing classmates. Many were varying degrees of conservative. I was probably the most liberal of everyone. I will mention that in sharing the class with the same people for so many years I noticed everyone’s beliefs become firmer over time. Despite differences in opinion, no one’s beliefs changed.

4) Now, what about college? Did you have any of the stereotypical radical left-wing professors? If not, did you have something different?

I haven’t encountered any overt leanings in any of my professors.

5) What has your political education left you?

I think my political education has left me more understanding of the points of view for those that have different political beliefs. I think it is easy to demonize the other side or any other political views. Being around intelligent people of opposite views has probably made me more open-minded. I suppose the best way to explain it is that I can attach a human element to political ideas.

6) What do you get out of FYM? Do you see it as a continuation of your education?

I don’t post in here much but it is interesting to read for the different views and opinions. I find that U2 fans can often be the most politically interested. It always makes for a fun read between breaks in the band’s action.
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