Your Conservative Side (or vice versa) - Page 2 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-11-2009, 08:33 PM   #16
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 30,343
Local Time: 04:43 AM
I'm not sure if I have any viewpoints that are conservative, honestly.
__________________

__________________
phillyfan26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 08:39 PM   #17
Rock n' Roll Doggie
FOB
 
Kieran McConville's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Auto Dafoe
Posts: 9,600
Local Time: 07:43 PM
Hmmm. well. Yes, I say I have a conservative streak in me. My politics are broadly social democratic in the labourist sense. I support a fair society with some redistribution and a minimum of destitution: universal health care, aged pensions, unemployment assistance etc. Where those things exist courtesy of the great mid-20th century progressive era, I do not support efforts, overt or otherwise, to wind them back.

A lot of what in contemporary parlance falls under the 'liberal' banner (some of it strikingly illiberal, particularly when it indulges in a desire to micromanage people's personal affairs) does not do much for me. At all.

A lot of what falls under the 'new left' banner (a very broad catch all admittedly and maybe including 'liberal' in some contexts) also does not do much for me. You know, the roll-call of attitudes of mind we are all supposed to share.

The environmental movement is very important of course, but I think it is a historical failing of conservatives... or not even conservatives, really, so much as the self-proclaimed Right... to allow that to become a left issue. History will kill them on this, and it's a shame (for them, anyway). Conversely, I do not think history will be kind to those who insist that anti-religion must be part of the progressive way*. In both instances, those who cut off their noses to spite their faces will lose all influence because they are not meeting the world as it is.

I do not support the politicisation of every aspect of life. That's the baseline.

*Though I should add that that is quite separate from the matter of secular government and freedom from established state religion. Which as a point of fact has zip to do with personal religious faith, and I despise the way the two are confused. Secular government is not a tool to kill religion, it is a way of saving both temporal and spiritual from their own worst impulses.
__________________

__________________
Kieran McConville is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 08:49 PM   #18
War Child
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Carlisle PA
Posts: 818
Local Time: 04:43 AM
I generally get lumped in with the Conservatives even though I hate religion and love abortion. I guess I generally prefer some of the Liberal ideas, I just find too much hypocrisy from it's followers. I take comfort in the fact that conservatives are full of shit and up front about it. I'll just stay here on this fence.
__________________
HyperU2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 09:02 PM   #19
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 30,499
Local Time: 04:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by financeguy View Post
But anyway, why not just post your reaction to the OP, there are loads of existing gay marriage threads where the specific issues around gay marriage can be discussed.

gosh, FG, so sorry to have derailed your thread.

anyway ... let's see ...

1. i'm quite uncomfortable with abortion itself, though i am passionate that it remain legal. i would be very happy if no one ever had a need for an abortion again.

2. i live rather conservatively, that is, my lifestyle is pretty conservative. i save a large part of my income, i am not extravagant by any means in attitude or dress, i conserve as much as i can in general in all areas. that should be, i think, the actual definition of a conservative.

3. i'd argue for the *intelligent* application of American power probably more often than not. the reason why i was so adamantly against Iraq was because it was perfect example of a *stupid* use of American power.

4. i am a fan of federalism -- while civil rights seem to be universal and the idea of voting on them seems grotesque, i see no reason why the people of Mississippi and the people of California should live under the same set of laws.

5. i have some ideological problems with hate crimes, though i understand where that legislation comes from. deciding who is and who isn't protected seems quite discriminatory to me.
__________________
Irvine511 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 09:07 PM   #20
BVS
Blue Crack Supplier
 
BVS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: between my head and heart
Posts: 40,697
Local Time: 03:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by BonosSaint View Post
1. I'm not anti-gun, although I am pro gun control--no gun sales at gunfairs,
background checks, required training and perhaps psychological testing
before someone is issued a carry permit.
2. I think a sense of entitlement has caused too many people to expect reward
without accomplishment--to be rewarded for who they think they are instead
of what they actually do. I'm not sure there is much of a market for excellence
anymore.
I agree with these two. I am not an absolutionists when it comes to gun control, but I don't believe in free reign as to who and where people can carry and I do think certain guns shouldn't be allowed and background checks should be required.

And I do think far too many that take advantage of social programs, but it doesn't mean that there aren't those that truly need it.

I think almost all politicians are "dirty" and I think I would entertain the idea of term limits that would eliminate career politicians.
__________________
BVS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 09:28 PM   #21
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 30,343
Local Time: 04:43 AM
I suppose I might have a conservative viewpoint on the education system. I can't be sure though, because I'm not sure how partisan the issue is.
__________________
phillyfan26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 10:08 PM   #22
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
maycocksean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Most Important State in the Union
Posts: 4,882
Local Time: 04:43 AM
Fascinating thread so far folks. It's so easy to think we've got other posters "figured out"--the responses here have given me pause and made me less quick to pigeonhole those who disagree with me on a given topic (as well as those who agree with me).
__________________
maycocksean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 10:38 PM   #23
BVS
Blue Crack Supplier
 
BVS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: between my head and heart
Posts: 40,697
Local Time: 03:43 AM
I understand conservative fiscal beliefs, but I think most are theory that do not work on the macro level, but work well in the micro. In fact I often vote conservative in local elections mainly when they have no real say in social issues.

I can't think of one social conservative issue that I can even possibly understand. I'm very much pro-family, I just have a more open mind to the definition of family. And when it comes to single mother or gay couples adopting, I completely approve but like ALL adoption both male and female role models are important but it doesn't matter to me if it's a mother, father, uncle, aunt, grandparent, godparent etc...
__________________
BVS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 11:01 PM   #24
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Se7en's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: all around in the dark - everywhere
Posts: 3,531
Local Time: 04:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irvine511 View Post
1. i'm quite uncomfortable with abortion itself, though i am passionate that it remain legal. i would be very happy if no one ever had a need for an abortion again.

2. i live rather conservatively, that is, my lifestyle is pretty conservative. i save a large part of my income, i am not extravagant by any means in attitude or dress, i conserve as much as i can in general in all areas. that should be, i think, the actual definition of a conservative.
i agree with you on #1.

as far as #2 goes, i'm not sure consumption is necessarily a conservative/liberal issue. i guess it depends on how it's framed.
__________________
Se7en is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 11:05 PM   #25
She's the One
 
martha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Orange County and all over the goddamn place
Posts: 42,338
Local Time: 01:43 AM
I've been wracking my brain all day to try to come up with some viewpoints of mine that might be labeled conservative. I've thought of at least one, and then the responses here have made me think of others.

I have a general disdain for laws that are passed for my "own good." Helmet laws for adults and minors come to mind immediately. It's not that out of character if you think about it; I'm always blathering on about making my own decisions. The old conservatives used to be for personal responsibility, and I really like and respect that notion.

Believe it or not, I too feel that the ultimate goal is reduce the need for abortions, but until then, again, let me (in general) make my own decisions on that.

I was reminded here that I don't agree at all with shorter prison sentences. Too bad if you go the joint for twenty years. We all know what's right and wrong. Some of us think things through before we act.

So there you go.
__________________
martha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 11:15 PM   #26
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 04:43 AM
I am generally in favour of tougher prison sentences for certain crimes, because after going through law school and practicing, I no longer believe that it is possible to rehabilitate some people. And public safety should be the first concern.

I also have a more conservative stance on some civil liberties issues, most of them in the area of mental health law.

In the area of higher education, I am not opposed to higher tuition rates for certain professional degrees that come with a high earning potential. There should be better student loan programs than the existing ones but in principle, I don't mind having to pay a premium for my degree(s).
__________________
anitram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2009, 12:22 AM   #27
Forum Moderator
 
yolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,471
Local Time: 10:43 AM
Much of what immediately comes to mind for me has less to do with actual political ideology, than with popular caricatures of what liberal as opposed to conservative "lifestyles" supposedly look like. Like Sean and/or Bono's shades, I seldom drink, don't smoke or do drugs, I'm raising my kids with the teaching that sex is for marriage just like I was raised with, our family are observant Jews and religion is a major part of our lives, etc. (oh, and I'm so pathetically out of the loop on anything 'Hollywood' or TV-related that it's really downright un-American, never mind stereotypically 'un-liberal'). I grew up in a smalltown Southern, primarily Baptist setting and still feel quite comfortable in such social environments, regardless of the fact that they often entail a local political majority considerably to the right of me.

Relatedly, like a few other liberals (and some conservatives) in here, I also grew up poor in a poor community, and can understand and relate to certain concerns that support for social programs is at times compromised by an unrealistic, ironically patronizing blind spot to the all-too-real existence of self-defeatingly cynical attitudes towards education, work, and savings, and the role these often play in keeping poor people poor despite reasonably well-designed public assistance. Ultimately, my inclination to support such programs has less to do with optimism that many adults like that are likely to change, than a conviction that their children are therefore going to be operating at enough of a disadvantage in life without the state giving up on them too. You can preach until you're blue in the face in the abstract about self-discipline, delayed gratification etc., and at the end of the day it won't mean jack-shit if your audience hasn't had that intimately role-modeled for them on multiple levels. Teachers, social workers and the like aren't by any means true substitutes for responsible parents, but they do offer some promise of mentorship and some reason to have faith in the future, and that can make a powerful difference--as a teacher myself, I've seen it happen, many many times. (Of course, hopefully needless to clarify, there are also a great many people who are in dire economic straits despite an exemplary work ethic and disciplined management of whatever financial resources their labor afforded them; and their history of good-faith contributions to society should be returned in kind to the fullest extent affordable when bad luck strikes, through job-training programs, adult-education funding, needed stopgap funds to cover bare-bones essentials for them and their dependents, etc., until their situations stabilize.)

On abortion policy, I personally favor an approach of legally unrestricted access to abortion through the end of the first trimester, and after that only for medical reasons as certified by a doctor. Not sure where on the political spectrum that stance falls, really. I firmly believe it unacceptable for the state to assume such absolute power over what happens inside its own citizens' bodies as to force women to carry and bear children against their will with no window of time for individual control, but I also believe it's bad for women, both as individuals and as potential parents to the next generation, not to be expected to rise to that level of responsible decisiveness for something so potentially consequential to society as the arrival of a new person and citizen into its ranks.

I do support some enhancements to our existing gun-control laws, such as closing the 'secondary market' loopholes which allow gun-show, swap-meet and internet sales with no background checks; child-access prevention laws concerning storage; mandatory training; and increasing the (Bureau of) AFT's scope for tracking sales at licensed dealers, and shutting down or temporarily revoking licenses of those to whom large numbers of guns acquired through black-market-bound 'straw purchases' are traced. That said, while I'm open to the possibility of even further restrictions (should such measures be well-implemented and still fail to dramatically reduce firearms crime), my strong preference would be for a gradualist approach which balances our long tradition of a constitutional right to bear arms against the obvious public safety issues, without effectively dismissing either.

Great thread Sean (et al.), thanks.
__________________
yolland [at] interference.com


μελετώ αποτυγχάνειν. -- Διογένης της Σινώπης
yolland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2009, 12:48 AM   #28
The Fly
 
NotBono's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 293
Local Time: 04:43 AM
I'm a registered Republican, however, I can't stand alot of the positions that Republicans take.

1. I'm for gay marriage
2. I believe pot should be decriminalized (provided its for personal consumption only); I still don't believe it should be legal (yet).
3. I'm for embryonic stem cell research (as long as abortion continues to be legal [personally against abortion])
4. I'm for an amnesty program for illegal immigrants, however, it must include some type of military or domestic service and require the language to be spoken.
5. (Neither side touches this one) I believe there needs to be a complete reform of welfare and a reevaluation of those receiving welfare.
6. I believe we need to invest in alternate fuels; not for environmental reasons, but to tell OPEC to shove it.
__________________
NotBono is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2009, 01:00 AM   #29
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 04:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by yolland View Post
Much of what immediately comes to mind for me has less to do with actual political ideology, than with popular caricatures of what liberal as opposed to conservative "lifestyles" supposedly look like. Like Sean and/or Bono's shades, I seldom drink, don't smoke or do drugs, I'm raising my kids with the teaching that sex is for marriage just like I was raised with, our family are observant Jews and religion is a major part of our lives, etc. (oh, and I'm so pathetically out of the loop on anything 'Hollywood' or TV-related that it's really downright un-American, never mind stereotypically 'un-liberal').
That's interesting in that I hadn't really thought of it in this context until you brought it up.

And interestingly enough while we'd be on the same side of the political spectrum on probably an overwhelming number of issues, my "lifestyle" is probably the antithesis of yours. Maybe even more interesting is the fact that while I was brought up in a traditional nuclear family, my parents really never promoted "conservative lifestyle" ideals I suppose. I'm not saying they let us run wild, but they didn't really make religion part of our daily life at all, I don't think they thought for one minute that we'd be virgins at marriage (having my mother take me to the Dr and put me on birth control might be a good indication, heh), and alcohol et al. was just seen as something that we should probably partake in and learn to use responsibly.

Thanks for bringing up this point, made me think.
__________________
anitram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2009, 03:19 AM   #30
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
BonosSaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 3,566
Local Time: 05:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by BonosSaint View Post
I think a sense of entitlement has caused too many people to expect reward
without accomplishment--to be rewarded for who they think they are instead
of what they actually do. I'm not sure there is much of a market for excellence
anymore.
.
In case, anyone misunderstood, I'm not talking about social programs (which I believe in for the most part as I believe there should be safety nets--though there should be a sharper crackdown on abuse) here, but a general sense of entitlement that seems to permeate through life. There isn't much of a connection between merit and reward.
__________________

__________________
BonosSaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
BRI - With or without you...... Gluey PLEBA Archive 1001 03-17-2009 12:10 AM
What kind of conservative are you? financeguy Free Your Mind 23 03-01-2009 12:38 PM
I 'heart' The Dark Side of the Moon purpleoscar Just the Bang and the Clatter 9 01-26-2009 05:15 PM
Maybe you were born liberal or conservative: study BoMac Free Your Mind 11 09-23-2008 08:05 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com