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Old 12-17-2011, 10:04 PM   #316
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I just want to know which industries have the growth potential to reverse a trend towards inequality on that scale, in a country the size of ours.
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:07 PM   #317
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I just want to know which industries have the growth potential to reverse a trend towards inequality on that scale, in a country the size of ours.
There are no immediate solutions to the problems created by the aftermath of two successive massive credit bubbles. America will continue to gravitate towards socialism.
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:45 PM   #318
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I just want to know which industries have the growth potential to reverse a trend towards inequality on that scale, in a country the size of ours.
Energy.

Look what North Dakota and western Pennsylvania are doing in this "jobless" recovery. Dangerous but good paying jobs in coal, refineries, pipelines, natural gas and offshore drilling. Not to mention trucking, building and servicing equipment and local jobs created in a boom. And the middle class benefits from lower energy costs.

President Solyndra sees things differently however.
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:45 PM   #319
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I'm both #13 and #30 on that list, unfortunately.
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Old 12-18-2011, 10:29 PM   #320
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I'm lucky to have my parents as my landlords, but that luck can't last forever.
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Old 12-20-2011, 12:20 AM   #321
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I'm sorry sue4u2



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Energy.

Look what North Dakota and western Pennsylvania are doing in this "jobless" recovery. Dangerous but good paying jobs in coal, refineries, pipelines, natural gas and offshore drilling. Not to mention trucking, building and servicing equipment and local jobs created in a boom. And the middle class benefits from lower energy costs.

President Solyndra sees things differently however.
Yeah, like Solyndra is the first government funded company/bank/wall street firm, oil & or gas company - do I need to go on? - etc. to go under.
Oh my goddess!! impeach the President.

No doubt we have to depend on oil and coal for a bit longer, but if we don't start investing in substainable alternatives we are screwed. Europe is building total substainable buildings (solar, wind & thermal w/ hydrogen storage) and Germany is leading the way in alternative fuels, also.
Investment in Education in this country is going to have make a drastic reform in order to teach the new world technology needed to implement these changes. If we don't stop squabbling over party politics and stupid stubborn ideologies, that both sides are guilty of, then forget the future.
Our childrens, childern, (if that long) will be living as slaves to whoever perfects it first.

(PS: I didn't get evicted this month, at least. The corporation that owns these apts cut me some slack. I had till 5pm today. I got the last $50 at 6 after, but the office stayed open for me. Still good people out there. There's still hope.
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Old 12-21-2011, 03:56 PM   #322
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Energy.

Look what North Dakota and western Pennsylvania are doing in this "jobless" recovery. Dangerous but good paying jobs in coal, refineries, pipelines, natural gas and offshore drilling. Not to mention trucking, building and servicing equipment and local jobs created in a boom. And the middle class benefits from lower energy costs.

President Solyndra sees things differently however.
And polluting all the groundwater at the same time.
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Old 12-21-2011, 08:25 PM   #323
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and we continue to get...

e-mail I got from the WH

"$40 is big money for us"

Yesterday, we asked you to tell us what losing $40 per paycheck would mean to you and your family if the House doesn’t pass the bipartisan payroll tax cut compromise by the end of this year.

The response was truly overwhelming. Thousands of Americans have responded and we wanted to make sure you saw some of the responses that have poured in from across the country.

If you haven't already, tell us what $40 means for you and your family, and see what it means for other Americans.


Stories submitted on WhiteHouse.gov

I can buy lunch from the cafeteria for almost a whole month for my twins, I can buy food, or pay for gas. I can save it for my daughter’s prescriptions deductibles. To some people $40 is nothing, but $40 is big money for us.
L.A., Hamden, Connecticut

$40.00 a paycheck will allow me to continue to pay co-pays to doctors for necessary medical treatments needed to control debilitating disease.
J.R., Arlington, Texas

Our cable internet bill is $49 per month. If we lose this payroll tax cut then we will have to give up either or internet access or possibly our 'Friday Family Pizza' night. Either way, we will lose something that brings us together as a family.
K.Z., Frederick, Maryland

After everything that comes out, including my mortgage my take home pay is $150.00 every two weeks. So minus forty would be $110.00. I can barely get by now, that forty bucks is my gas for my car to get to work. Taking forty away from my pay would, just about put me under.
R.T., Charleston, West Virginia

$40 less a paycheck means I will have to pick between my insulin and the water bill. It means never being able to see my doctor - even though I have insurance.
B.T., Roswell, New Mexico

90 days of prescription drugs
P.B., Milledgeville, Georgia

$40 a paycheck for my family helps pay for insulin, syringes, and blood sugar testing strips for my daughter, who was diagnosed with type I diabetes 5 years ago.
N.F., Midwest City, Oklahoma

The $40 I would lose is money I send to help my brother. He has had a myriad of health problems over the past two years and has only been able to work intermittently. He was recently diagnosed with inoperable cancer and has no health insurance. Without what some say isn't a lot of money, my brother wouldn't have food in his refrigerator.
S.K., Somerville, Massachusetts

Normally any extra money I have. I give to the needy. Salvation Army is my favorite charity. So I won’t be giving to charities or buying anything for anyone.
P.C., Lakeville, Minnesota

More here

What #40dollars Means to Americans | The White House
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Old 12-21-2011, 10:08 PM   #324
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^ But surely these lazy good for nothings could easily set up a business, say, for example, a hedge fund or an investment bank, and cream millions off the taxpayer in the best entrepreneurial American way?

I don't know what these freeloading ne'er do wells are complaining about, quite frankly.

If they hate the American system so much that they have to take to the internet with their whining little complaints, why don't they emigrate to North Korea?
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Old 12-21-2011, 10:10 PM   #325
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I have to admit I'm a little stressed about losing that $40 per paycheck as well.
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Old 03-12-2012, 10:39 PM   #326
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Interesting, if depressing, stat from the Atlantic:


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It's also not just a burden on young people. The New York Fed's study found that only about a third of all student debt belongs to Americans under 30. Another third belongs to adults between the ages of 30 and 39. And according to one recent study, adults between the ages 35 and 49 are the fastest growing category of borrowers. Part of the reason may be that the tough job market has forced older workers back to school in order to learn new skills. But it's not clear that investment is paying off.

Americans, young and old, are turning to education in an economy that values technical skills, and has little use for a high school degree. And now they're stumbling under the weight of the debt they've incurred. It would be easy to chalk this up to the bad economy--and clearly that's playing a role--but there may be a deeper, harder-to-remedy problem at play. Simply put: Too many students don't graduate...less than 60% of US undergraduates seeking a bachelor's degree graduate within six years. Just 30% of those seeking an associate's degree finish within three years. It's an abysmal record, and it may go a long way to explaining the trouble borrowers are having paying back their loans. A few months back, the Wall Street Journal profiled a hedge fund that specializes in packaging student loans into securities for investors. The firm had found that whether a student graduated was one of the two most important predictors of if they would eventually pay back their loans. The second? Whether they graduated on time.
The low graduation rate is presumably also relevant to another stat I saw recently, which was that students at for-profit colleges, though only about 9% of all college students, account for 44% of all student loan defaults. For-profit colleges, like community colleges, disproportionately enroll poor students seeking associate's degrees, most of whom never finish.
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Old 03-13-2012, 01:24 AM   #327
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For-profit colleges are basically massive scams: they sign people up who almost uniformly don't graduate, and their degrees are not respected in many fields of employment anyway.
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:14 PM   #328
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The American Association of Community Colleges just released a report surveying the unenviable state of community college students (at 44% of all US college students, a much larger group than their 4-year public, private, or for-profit counterparts):
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Fewer than half (46%) of students who enter community colleges with the goal of earning a degree or certificate have attained that goal, transferred to a baccalaureate institution, or are still enrolled 6 years later. The rates, unfortunately, are lower for Hispanic, Black, Native American, and low-income students.
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Almost a third (30%) of entering students do not attend orientation; most avoid online orientation; about 90% indicate that academic planning and advising is important to them, yet less than a third of entering students report that a college advisor helped them set academic goals and create a plan for achieving them; and although a large majority of entering students are underprepared for college-level work, 76% never use tutoring services. Well into the first term, many students have almost no idea of how well or poorly they are doing academically and report a general sense of bewilderment with registration processes.
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Developmental (remedial) education is all too often a burial ground for student aspirations. Getting up to speed in math and reading for some students can take 3 or more years...Among high school graduates, only 24% of those intending to go to college meet all four ACT benchmarks of college readiness in English, mathematics, reading, and science.
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Too many senior college and university leaders, faculty, department chairs, and deans are ambivalent about community colleges, understanding them not as having different missions but as somehow inferior because of their open-door admissions. Community college transfer students often have to fight to have their credits recognized at baccalaureate institutions, and universities often are reluctant to share data about transfer students and their performance. This ambivalence complicates the effort to improve articulation between the two sectors and lends credence to calls for more comprehensive policy solutions at the state level.
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[S]tudents’ plans prior to college entry indicate very little understanding of employment possibilities in high-demand, high-wage fields. The disparities in employment plans versus employment demand are striking:

The report lays out seven steps to improvement, with emphases on expanded student advising/mentoring and coordination between colleges and high schools to increase college readiness.

When the Obama Administration announced plans to overhaul and expand the community college system a couple years back, I said here at the time that while I was in principle strongly supportive, there absolutely had to be thorough study undertaken first of why these schools' graduation rates are so low, so that we're not just throwing money at a problem whose dimensions we don't understand. The finding of serious systemic weaknesses in advising and in secondary-tertiary coordination fits closely what I've observed in our transfer students (and indeed in many of our students, period). While the picture this report paints is pretty bleak, it's at least encouraging to see solid groundwork being done.
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:30 PM   #329
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i'd be very interested to know why community college students don't finish their degree. i've never attended one but i do know the biggest one in memphis looks nice enough, but you can't even get federal funding for it because too many students defaulted on their loans. that alone could make or break it for a lot of students. it can't be that expensive to attend (as compared to a university, i mean - even a public one) but if you've got to foot the bill yourself or rely on private loans which you might not qualify for, one semester you could be fine. the next? you could lose your job or circumstances could change and suddenly you can't attend school anymore.
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:34 PM   #330
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Some of those figures are not surprising, considering many community colleges in the US are High School 2.0 / holding tanks for people who have no business going to college and should have been presented many vocational training options in high school.
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