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Old 10-07-2011, 10:25 PM   #76
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Bono - may call him a thoughtful and tender father, but that was not always the case.


CEO of world's most successful company committed perjury and let his daughter go on welfare
For some reason we always want people who accomplish great things to be great human beings as well, despite the fact that there is no logical reason the two need be connected.
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Old 10-08-2011, 02:40 AM   #77
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By Brian Hiatt
October 7, 2011 6:10 PM ET

Bono and Steve Jobs announce the release of the U2 Special Edition iPod.
Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images

Steve Jobs came out of a Sixties rock and roll ethos, which is fascinating.
That's the big story. If you asked in the Eighties, "Who is going to invent the 21st century," you'd probably have thought the Japanese or maybe the British or the Germans. No, it was sandal-wearing, anarchic music-lovers from California. And that is fucking great.

In the Sixties, bands from the Bay Area felt they were going to change the world, but they didn't. They changed my world, they changed your world, but they didn't change the world. Before that happened, they disappeared, like so many of us do, up their own rectum – drugs and the vicissitudes took their toll.

However, the next generation really did change the world. The people who invented the 21st century had their consciousness shaped by music and by powerful rock and roll music, and it's not just Steve Jobs, it was Paul Allen, it was lots of people. I once put this to Bill Gates, I said, "I know you probably didn't listen to Jimi Hendrix," and Bill protested, "Are you kidding me, in all my time with Paul Allen, how could I have not been shaped by Jimi Hendrix? That's all we heard 10 hours a day."

It's remarkable what's come out of Haight-Ashbury. The children of the Sixties are seriously changing the world. Steve Jobs is right up there, he is, in many ways, the Bob Dylan of machines, he's the Elvis of the kind of hardware-software dialectic. He's a creature of quite progressive thinking, and his reverence for shape and sound and contour and creativity did not come from the boardroom.

Does the Elvis analogy really hold up?
I really respect people who are involved in business who have an artist's eye and ear. There are very few. Steve was a very, very tough and tenacious guardian of the Apple brand, but the thing that endeared him to artists was his insistence that things had to be beautiful. He wasn't going to make ugly things that made profits.

The big lesson for capitalism is that Steve, deep down, did not believe the consumer was right. Deep down, he believed that he was right. And that the consumer would respect a strong aesthetic point of view, even if it wasn't what they were asking for. He believed that deep down, if he served what was right and what was great, then he would serve the Apple shareholder, and if he chased what they wanted, he would let them down.

What's the essence of his legacy?
This dude, my friend, and I'm proud to say, my colleague – he changed music, he changed film, he changed the personal computer. It's a wonderful encouragement to people who want to think differently, that's where artists connect with him. The picture of Einstein with his tongue sticking out, that's actually the very heart of the brand, and that's the punk rock piece, the attitude, and the anarchic mind that dreamt up the 21st century. That's a real encouragement for people who didn't go to an Ivy League school, who don't know how to use a knife and fork, who don't have the right accent. That anarchic West Coast "fuck off" attitude actually rules the 21st century. That's what's happening on the streets of Cairo, that's what's happening in North Africa – received wisdom is being balked at. A gnarly, singular point of view, like Steve Jobs, feels like a lighthouse spinning: When you're in the fog, you just go, "I'll go over there."

How did U2's association with Steve Jobs and Apple begin?
Steve was trying to sort out one of the fundamental questions of the age: is there any value to a musician's work? He thought that with iTunes, he could make it easier for people who wanted to respect intellectual copyright. So we had the idea to offer "Vertigo" for an iPod commercial, and we went out to see Steve at his house in Palo Alto and he was like, "What? You guys want to give me a song for a commercial? Wow, that's great, that's amazing." Then we said we wanted to be in the commercial, and he said "Maybe, yeah, I don't see why not."

Then we said we don't want to be paid, but we'd like a U2 iPod, a black one. His first response was, "That doesn't work at all. iPods are white!" But it turned out lots of people wanted them – and not because of U2. Because they were red and black!

I then pressed on Steve in terms of the global fight against AIDS, and his wife had been a great supporter of the Global Fund, which the UN had set up to try and get AIDS drugs to people, and Steve was very open to this and I can tell you that after his contribution to the (RED) Global Fund to buy drugs for people who would be dead without them, there are tens of thousands of people who owe the rest of their lives to Apple's commitment.

What was your relationship like?
In my own involvement with him, my real personal enjoyment of him as a man, he was a clear thinker, on lots of subjects, and I could turn to him. My actual last conversation with him was he called me because he was worried about my health, which is a clue to him. This tough guy was very tender, and he said, "I don't like the look of you, you look worn out," and I said, "What? I'm fine!" He wouldn't listen to me.

When I hurt my spine and I was in trouble, this package arrived of books and CDs and music and honey from their garden – tons of stuff arrived at the house. And so, yes, he was a captain of industry, a warrior for his companies. But I found him to be a very thoughtful friend, and a wonderfully detailed and interested parent of his kids, and lover of his wife. There were those two sides to him, the warrior, and then the very, very tender and soft-spoken side. I already miss him.
Exclusive QA: Bono on Steve Jobs' Rock and Roll Spirit | Music News | Rolling Stone
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Old 10-08-2011, 03:41 AM   #78
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Seriously, is Bono okay?
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Old 10-08-2011, 04:24 AM   #79
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no
He was an executive director.
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Old 10-08-2011, 12:56 PM   #80
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rip steve jobs

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Old 10-08-2011, 02:49 PM   #81
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He was an executive director.
Steve Job's wealth at the time of his death was greater because of Pixar than Apple.
Pixar's success was launched by Toy Story.
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Old 10-08-2011, 02:57 PM   #82
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For some reason we always want people who accomplish great things to be great human beings as well, despite the fact that there is no logical reason the two need be connected.


There are many 'truths' out there.

Steve Job's did what he believed was best for Steve Jobs.

People are just people, at their deaths, there seems to be a rush to tell wonderful stories. I guess I understand that. If anyone wants to spend a little time, based on what I have seen, I do fault Steve Jobs for the way he treated his father, and his (defacto) denial of his Arab? lineage.

My thoughts are all people are good. Sometimes people do bad things, sometimes they do good things.
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Old 10-11-2011, 10:44 AM   #83
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For some reason we always want people who accomplish great things to be great human beings as well, despite the fact that there is no logical reason the two need be connected.
I think that's such a good point, very well said. Sure Steve Jobs had plenty of personal faults and failings, as we all do in varying degrees. Who knows what regrets he may have had or what was on his mind at the time of his death. Not for me to judge, I didn't know him.

As for his charity work his friend Dr. Dean Ornish said he wanted to give anonymously and didn't want any credit. I think it's rather pathetic and sad for anyone to try to criticize him for that when no one really knows how much he gave.
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Old 10-12-2011, 02:06 PM   #84
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You know, the same could be said about Bono. I've heard a lot of people criticize him when he participates in campaigns to raise money for African charities. They say, "Bono's filthy rich. Why doesn't he just give his own money instead of trying to get other people to donate?"

Well, how do we know that Bono and Ali haven't given a big chunk of cash to charity? None of us have seen their personal financial records. Bono is by nature a generous person. He also believes in the Bible, which advocates giving some of what you have to those who are less fortunate. So I think Bono probably donates a substantial amount, but -- like Steve Jobs -- he prefers not to publicize that.
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:07 PM   #85
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I actually have more respect for people who don't publicize their charity donations. When some celebrities hold press conferences or such to announce their donating some of their money to charities, it comes across as a PR stunt to me. Then again, I tend to be cynical when it comes to celebrities.
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:48 PM   #86
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I actually have more respect for people who don't publicize their charity donations. When some celebrities hold press conferences or such to announce their donating some of their money to charities, it comes across as a PR stunt to me. Then again, I tend to be cynical when it comes to celebrities.
Even if it's not a PR stunt, it's a pat on their own back at best
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Old 10-18-2011, 02:54 PM   #87
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Steve Jobs is like a like John Lennon to the technology world. There was an advert for Intel once which said "our rock stars are different from your rock stars"
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Old 10-22-2011, 10:54 AM   #88
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I already wanted to read this book but now I really want to. It's out Monday. Sorry, don't know why it copied like this.



(AFP) Insights into Apple co-founder Steve Jobs's vendetta against Google and his criticisms of fellow high-tech titans spread quickly online ahead of the Monday release of his authorized biography.

Excerpts of the book, "Steve Jobs", went viral -- especially his reported vow to annihilate Google-backed Android software for smartphones and tablets that he felt had ripped off iPhone and iPad ideas.

"I'm going to destroy Android, because it's a stolen product," Jobs's biographer quoted him as saying early last year.

"I'm willing to go thermonuclear war on this," he said. "I don't want your money. If you offer me $5 billion, I won't want it. I've got plenty of money. I want you to stop using our ideas in Android, that's all I want."

Biographer Walter Isaacson's work also contains an unflattering assessment of Bill Gates, co-founder of US computer software colossus Microsoft that for decades served as the Goliath to Apple's David.

"He'd be a broader guy if he had dropped acid once or gone off to an ashram when he was younger," said Jobs, who went to India on a spiritual journey after dropping out of college in the 1970s.

"Bill is basically unimaginative and has never invented anything, which is why I think he's more comfortable now in philanthropy than technology," he added. "He just shamelessly ripped off other people's ideas."

Reactions to the excerpts in online chat forums included comment that while Jobs changed the world with iPods, iPhones, and iPads, they were improvements on MP3 players, smartphones and tablets that had come before them.

Jobs also had blunt words for Michael Dell, chief of the eponymous computer maker based in Texas.

The biography tells of Dell saying in 1997 that if he were Jobs, he would shut down then-struggling Apple and "give the money back to shareholders."

Jobs told of responding to Dell with an email message that read: "CEOs are supposed to have class...I can see that isn't an opinion you hold."

Jobs returned to the Apple helm in 1996 and steered it to new heights -- it is now among the world's most valuable companies.

A new generation "iPhone 5" is believed to be the last Apple innovation that Jobs worked on at the Cupertino, California-based company.

In the biography, Jobs praised Apple senior vice president of industrial design Jonathan "Jony" Ive as being his partner in dreaming up devices.

"If I had a spiritual partner at Apple, it's Jony," Jobs is quoted as saying. "Jony and I think up most of the products together and then pull others in and say, 'Hey, what do you think about this?'"

Jobs also spoke of his faith in Tim Cook, who took over the Apple helm shortly before Jobs's death on October 5 at the age of 56.

Jobs refused early surgery for the pancreatic cancer that eventually took his life, experimenting instead with alternative treatments, according to his biographer.

Isaacson, in an interview with the CBS show "60 Minutes" to be broadcast Sunday, said Jobs told him he regretted the decision to put off the operation.

The book also includes details of the private and romantic life of the notoriously secretive Jobs, as well as his business dealings.

Jobs reportedly joked to Isaacson that he had to hide the kitchen knives from his liberal wife when they had Rupert Murdoch, the conservative chief executive of News Corp., over for dinner at their home.

Jobs liked Murdoch but not his Fox News organization known for promoting conservative political agendas, according to the biography.

Jobs reportedly told Murdoch that the US was divided and that the News Corp. king was siding with the "destructive" side.

In Jobs's own words, Microsoft was "mostly irrelevant" and unlikely to change as long as Steve Ballmer was chief executive.

According to the book, Jobs began meeting in the spring with people he wanted to see before he died. They included Gates, who visited Jobs's home in May for more than three hours.

Book snippets included Jobs warning US President Barack Obama last year that he was "headed for a one-term presidency" and offering to help create political ads for the 2012 campaign.

A chapter of the biography devoted to Jobs's love of music includes him being a fan of the guitar talents of John Mayer but expressing concern that the singer was "out of control" in a potentially self-destructive way.

Isaacson's 656-page book is being published by Simon & Schuster.

Isaacson, chief executive of the Aspen Institute think-tank, has also penned biographies of Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein and Henry Kissinger.
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Old 10-24-2011, 06:17 PM   #89
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I got the book book today and Bono makes several appearances. In the music chapter there's one anecdote about how Jobs didn't want Apple in parenthesis for the RED campaign. Bono told him that was how they showed unity for the cause and the conversation got heated, to the f you stage, before they agreed to sleep on it.

The compromise was that Bono could do what he wanted in the ads, but Jobs would never put Apple in parenthesis on any of his products or in any Apple stores.

Bono said that Steve could be "sparky" but that made them closer friends because there aren't that many people in your life that you can have those types of discussions with. After U2 shows that Steve would attend he would always talk to Bono and give his opinions.

Steve Jobs also told Yo-Yo Ma that his playing was the best argument for the existence of God because a human alone couldn't do that (after he played Bach for him at Steve's house). He made him promise to play at his funeral.

They tried to make a deal for another U2 ad for iPod with Get On Your Boots but they couldn't agree to terms.
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Old 10-24-2011, 06:25 PM   #90
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They tried to make a deal for another U2 ad for iPod with Get On Your Boots but they couldn't agree to terms.
Please tell me that one of Jobs' terms was "Can we use Magnificent instead? It would be a much better choice."

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