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Old 10-06-2011, 10:15 AM   #46
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Goodbye Steve.

Might pick up an iPad 2 in your honour this weekend.
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Old 10-06-2011, 10:55 AM   #47
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RIP Pancreatic cancer is evil.

People throw that word visionary around but he truly was one. Last night they kept showing that commencement speech at Stanford when he said that death is one of the greatest inventions of life.
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Old 10-06-2011, 11:16 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by MrsSpringsteen View Post
Pancreatic cancer is evil.
That and esophageal cancer are my two worst nightmares. I've known several people who have died from those before age 60.


Steve Jobs made my life easier and more fun, and there is probably only one other person I can say that about. I usually don't like mushy memorials, but...
Thanks Steve. I wouldn't be where I am today without Apple.
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Old 10-06-2011, 12:27 PM   #49
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i thought this was nice and kind of insightful:


Quote:
Steve Jobs Stanford Commencement Speech 2005 - YouTube

The reason he strikes such a huge chord with an entire generation lies, it seems to me, beyond his immense technical and business and design skills. It was because he became the bridge between the 1960s and the 1980s, the counter-culture and the counter-counter-culture. He was the hippie capitalist. He was the fusion of two great American forces - personal actualization and a free market. Listening to his Stanford Commencement speech above is a revelation, isn't it? He was a baby turned over for adoption by his biological parents. He dropped out of school. He was fired at the age of 30 by the very company he had founded. And in the face of early humbling, he focused on his own vision and his own passion - an individualist creed forged in the crucible of a sure knowledge of his own mortality, of his own death.

This sentence resonates very deeply with me:

Quote:
Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true. Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
These are the words of a man with great spiritual insight, and the courage to live it (because true spirituality requires extreme courage). His worldview was forged by an eery prescience of his own mortality. He got there long before his cancer diagnosis, which, perhaps, was why he transcended it with six of the most spectacularly creative and successful years of his life. And this fusion of counter-cultural courage with capitalist genius is what defines our time - as well as the fear-ridden reaction against it.

Jobs simply defied convention at every stage in his life. He saw how the arts could deeply inform the sciences in revolutionizing human life and interaction. He dropped out of college in order to intensify his learning. And that learning came from many sources:

Quote:
After dropping out of Reed College, a stronghold of liberal thought in Portland, Ore., in 1972, Mr. Jobs led a countercultural lifestyle himself. He told a reporter that taking LSD was one of the two or three most important things he had done in his life. He said there were things about him that people who had not tried psychedelics — even people who knew him well, including his wife — could never understand.
Quote:
Decades later he flew around the world in his own corporate jet, but he maintained emotional ties to the period in which he grew up. He often felt like an outsider in the corporate world, he said. When discussing the Silicon Valley’s lasting contributions to humanity, he mentioned in the same breath the invention of the microchip and “The Whole Earth Catalog,” a 1960s counterculture publication.
This is the fusion that has made the best in our modern world - and those who reflexively mock the counterculture miss its spiritual genius because they are incapable of the courage needed to understand it better. Think of Pixar. I remember during the darkest days after 9/11 feeling bleaker about the future than ever before in my life. And I went to see a Pixar movie. For some reason, I came out feeling better about the world and its prospects. If a civilization could produce that kind of genius conflation of the left and right sides of the brain, if it could also turn that into exquisite beauty and laughter and even sadness, then this civilization was a formidable force against its nihilist fundamentalist enemies at home and abroad. No politician - save Obama at his best - ever reassured in quite that comprehensive a way. And what was reassuring was that this had been rooted in a vision from an individual who took no-one else's lead and had the courage to realize it, to his own exacting standards of perfection.

Steve Jobs' approach to life is terrifying for most of us, because it demands firstly the hardest thing - facing death - and then its necessary, scary corollary - living your own life, and no one else's. These are difficult things, the bequests of a modernity we were born into, and perhaps beyond most human beings. Hence the enduring nihilist appeal of fundamentalism in all its forms - a fundamentalist approach to religion, in which fallible words are turned into literal gods; a fundamentalist approach to politics, in which every problem is defined by a dogma and every solution found in a catechism; and a fundamentalist approach to life, which is rooted in obedience and rules and the false comfort of Manicheanism, rather than freedom and love and terrifying, liberating existential doubt.

You cannot teach these things in a book. But you can see them in a life. And every life lived without fear is a life that can sustain and nourish others. And Jobs truly lived without fear - which enabled him to create beyond the measure of most mortals. That he had, in the end, everything to fear - a rare pancreatic cancer slowly moving toward him - only makes his energy and spirit more vibrant.

He was alive when he died.

How many of us live as if we were already dead?



Why Steve Jobs Matters - The Dish | By Andrew Sullivan - The Daily Beast
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Old 10-06-2011, 01:40 PM   #50
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Of all the cool stuff Apple has sold I think he should not be forgotten for the mouse! Think of computing without a mouse....
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Old 10-06-2011, 02:28 PM   #51
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this, too, was interesting:

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Steve Jobs was a genius, and one of the most important businessmen and inventors of our time. But he was not a kindly, soft-spoken sage who might otherwise live atop a mountain in India, dispatching wisdom to pilgrims. He was a taskmaster who knew how to get things done. "Real artists ship" was an Apple battle cry from the earliest days. Everyone, by now, knows about the Steve Jobs "reality distortion field" -- the charismatic Care Bear Stare that compels otherwise reasonable people to spend weeks in line for a slightly faster telephone. In his biography of Jobs, journalist Alan Deutschman described the Apple co-founder's lesser-known hero-shithead roller coaster. "He could be Good Steve or he could be Bad Steve. When he was Bad Steve, he didn't seem to care about the severe damage he caused to egos or emotions so long as he pushed for greatness." When confronted with the full "terrifying" wrath of Bad Steve (even over the slightest of details), the brains at Apple would push themselves beyond all personal limits to find a way to meet Jobs's exacting demands, and somehow return to his good graces. And the process would repeat itself. "Steve was willing to be loved or feared, whatever worked." As Bud Tribble, Vice President of Software Technology at Apple explained. "It let the engineers know that it wasn't OK to be sloppy in anything they did, even the 99 percent that Steve would never look at."

That attention to detail makes Apple products unique and desired. Does any other company produce ubiquitous, mass-market devices that still feel so rare, and deeply personal? Steve Jobs did that.

His life was too short, but never wasted, and his impact reaches even those who've never touched an Apple product. He ushered in the personal computing era, and rallied from pancreatic cancer to show us a glimpse of the post-PC world. That didn't just happen; it was made to happen.

In Praise of Bad Steve - D.B. Grady - Technology - The Atlantic
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Old 10-06-2011, 02:56 PM   #52
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Walt Disney was the same way. I'm sure it's a trait in common with most successful people, particularly those whose end result is customer satisfaction.
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:02 PM   #53
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I want to thank Steve Jobs for creating technology that was understandable and accessible even to a Luddite like me. My first computer was an early iMac, a purple one that I named Alexander the Grape. I didn't have to enlist some geek to set it up for me. I just took it out of the box and plugged it in. What a concept! Steve Jobs made sure his products worked intuitively, so anybody could use them. He democratized the world of computers.
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:07 PM   #54
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Steve Jobs > Syria's gift to the world

No doubt the discussion about this person will only swell as times goes on.



The son of Abdulfattah Jandali, a Syrian born Reno, Nevada casino Vice President.

Add that to the list of things I (we) did not know about Steve (Jandali) Jobs.


Quote:
Jobs was born in San Francisco on Feb. 24, 1955, to Joanne Carole Schieble and Syrian immigrant Abdulfattah Jandali, unmarried University of Wisconsin graduate students.
Steve Jobs dies; obituary; Apple's co-founder transformed computers, culture - latimes.com

I learned a few things in my morning paper today. Interesting and very, very impressive.


My hope is that this thread can be used for any and all general discussion about Steve Jobs, his life, work and legacy, etc.
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:37 PM   #55
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I was up in the University District this morning and I stopped by the Seattle Apple Store. Looks like they have it closed down for a day of mourning, which actually surprised me. They had all the windows blacked out, but I could actually hear someone speaking and applause inside, so they must have had some sort of ceremony/pep talk for the employees.

Either that or they are just prepping for the iPhone 4S launch, but I don't think they would close the store for that?


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Old 10-06-2011, 03:47 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Liesje View Post
Of all the cool stuff Apple has sold I think he should not be forgotten for the mouse! Think of computing without a mouse....
Although Xerox PARC invented that and some other user interface concepts used by Apple, kudos to Jobs for seeing the market value in it.
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:55 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by deep View Post
No doubt the discussion about this person will only swell as times goes on.



The son of Abdulfattah Jandali, a Syrian born Reno, Nevada casino Vice President.

Add that to the list of things I (we) did not know about Steve (Jandali) Jobs.




Steve Jobs dies; obituary; Apple's co-founder transformed computers, culture - latimes.com

I learned a few things in my morning paper today. Interesting and very, very impressive.


My hope is that this thread can be used for any and all general discussion about Steve Jobs, his life, work and legacy, etc.


I started a new thread because every time we start to discuss aspects of a person's life, that can include things that may be controversial in a RIP thread many people complain.

They say, this is a RIP thread, show some respect, this is for offering condolenses, etc.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:04 PM   #58
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There was nothing contentious or disrespectful in what you posted, it was simply biographical information such as numerous people have already posted in this RIP thread. In the event that tensions should break out over some subsequent post in here and people complain about an inappropriate tone, then that would be the point at which the mods might consider a split.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:07 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by Danny Boy View Post
I was up in the University District this morning and I stopped by the Seattle Apple Store. Looks like they have it closed down for a day of mourning, which actually surprised me.
On the news last night, they said it had been closed for renovations.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:13 PM   #60
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Ah, never mind. It was still cool to see the little memorial there.
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