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Old 05-11-2006, 10:06 AM   #46
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For those who haven't read the Da Vinci Code, without spoiling it for you, it tells the story of a man who made up a secret society and forged genealogical documents claiming that Jesus bloodline can be traced to the Merovingian's, the old French Royal Family. And what's more, there are those who claim that the Merovingian's can be traced to today's British Royal family, meaning that they are the descendents of Jesus Christ (Duh Duh DUH, indeed).

But I honestly thought Holy Blood, Holy Grail was better.
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Old 05-11-2006, 10:15 AM   #47
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Actually i think Tom Hanks is an ideal choice myself&from the trailers i've seen, he fits into it well

Oh the Louvre it's absolutely amazing and it's a gigantic place! i was there in '99&saw the Mona Lisa so it'd be so great to go back after reading the book&seeing the film the cafe in there is fantastic too!
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Old 05-11-2006, 03:27 PM   #48
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I couldn't get the book b/c they're all checked out, so last night I downloaded an audio version (I always enjoyed being read to as a child). It's funny b/c the guy reading it does all these different voices with French accents! Definitely not classic lit, but good for rec reading. I also downloaded a bootleg promo copy of the movie
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Old 05-11-2006, 04:01 PM   #49
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Had to delurk to comment on this:

Quote:
Originally posted by kimby
A Catholic group in India is urging Christians there to **starve themselves to death** in protest at the film release in India.

No, really--I just read it in Yahoo's entertainment section!!!
A story of people killings themselves because of what can only be described as religious lunacy showing up in the entertainment section of yahoo.... this is a truly bizarre world. I hope the story is untrue.
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Old 05-11-2006, 05:04 PM   #50
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Oh i think it definitely a classic with a capital C!
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Old 05-11-2006, 06:39 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally posted by BrownEyedBoy
I thought "Angels and Demons" was the better book. I don't see why there was more hype around "Code".
I thought so too! It was one of the first books I ever read by him and got me hooked on him. Now I am waiting for his newest novel to come out.
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Old 05-11-2006, 07:15 PM   #52
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Originally posted by Bono's shades
The previews for the movie look incredibly cheesy.
That's what casting Tom Hanks will get you.
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Old 05-11-2006, 07:34 PM   #53
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I am having a wonderful time reading all these pooh-pooing naysayers. Now tell me that you will reluctantly go to see the movie only b/c you want to appear "hip" or are drawn by the controversy, and then tell me you won;t see it again

I have a lot to say but won't say it right now....for me, the most provocative thing about the book is probably the only thing that is really true, and the easiest to believe...the broader concept of the book is how the "Founding Fathers" of the Church in its earliest years as a "state religion" (post 314-AD) may have used various nefarious methods to marginalize the role of women in the church, for many reasons, the LEAST of which being (IMO) a population reluctant to abandon goddess-oriented pagan belief systems with their Earth Mother fertility rltuals, including nature worship. It's a powerful argument, even if the details may not square off the way Brown argues them, b/c the baehaviors were not only slow to be abandoned by the authorities but may still be in evidence today. Everything from the whole Mary Magdalene identity bit, (which to me is perfectly believable...her NOT being a whore, anyway, whatever else she may have been..and if you read the Gospels, Jesus sure appears to have quite comfortable with, and known a lot of women!) to outlawing marriage among the priesthood (which didn't come about until only a thousand yrs ago, BTW) to the burning of witches to today's reluctance still to allow women a greater active role in the Catholic Church, in the clergy. It's a basic issue of power, and the visions of the world that those in power perpetuate, and I think this is what upsets Brown most of all. One of the most memorable passages from the book to me is where he tells Sophie how history is written by the winners, etc.

It is interesting to witness the parallel rising of both fundamentalist sects in the world's big religions and the popularity of New Age cults, many of which involve the "sacred feminine." How much of this is an unconscious manifestation of a cultural disconnect from what they may see as a religion that has been used to harm and pollute the earth? Or at least some groping around for meaning when we've done wrong and lost our way. New Age and fundamentlist Chrisianity are not as different as some suspect. They're tow different sides of the same coin. (Funny thing foir THIS "christian" to say. Witness, too, the typically dishevelled Wiccan subsection of the New Age area in yr local bookstore (and I used to work at one, so I know.) That can't all be put down to Harry Potter mania.

It's fascinating how this has shown up in even children's literature. Who here has read Philip Pullman's "The Golden Compass" series? (or "the Lyra books" as I call them.) The heroes are witches who care for the earth, and the villians are not only Catholics but actual ANGELS who aid those who desecrate it. You find it very hard not to take the side of the "environmentalists" in Pullman's debate. Read the series: it's a heady, intoxicating, even dangerous brew. If you think DVC is controversial, this might put that to shame--or at least give it a run for its money.

I do agree that Umberto Eco is the better writer. How many times have I read DVC< much as I like it, and not wishing it was he who had written it and that in the 25 or so yrs since The Name of The Rose came out, that in a generation the American attention span hadn't shrunk to the size of a gnat, to the point where he might have felt the need to write those damnabkle 2-pg long chapters?!?! Maybe he has potential but "censors himself" b/c of percived commercial limitations if he fleshed out his plots and characters more. If so, what a tragedy.) It's a classic, yes, but I'm still torn as to whether to call it literature or not. It employs no brilliant literary devices. The 6th Harry Potter Book was better written...Jo Rowling's depiction of Harry's awakening romantic longings and consciusness is brilliant (the whole "monster inside him" thing...how that develops in various stages,etc) Even Stephen KIng's "The Stand" was better written..and THAT qualifiies as "literature" in my book...borderline, though, and the only book of his that does.
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Old 05-11-2006, 07:48 PM   #54
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Originally posted by BrownEyedBoy
I thought "Angels and Demons" was the better book. I don't see why there was more hype around "Code".



Quote:
Originally posted by U2Girl1978


I thought so too! It was one of the first books I ever read by him and got me hooked on him. Now I am waiting for his newest novel to come out.
I don't read much but I did read DVC a couple of years ago, then went and bought the other 3 Dan Brown books. I agree that "Angels And Demons" was a better book. I'm currently re-reading DVC (paperback). It's been so long, and I want to refresh my memory to the story before seeing the movie...
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Old 05-11-2006, 08:08 PM   #55
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You made some interesting points Teta, especcially your reasons why so called "New Age" religions, especcially those that focus on femininity have become so popular. Besides, most of Christianity rituals are pagan based, or the so calle "old religion" as opposed to "New Age".

I think, IMO, the Catholic Church needs to address these issues, if it wants to prevent further decline in membership to the church. We live in a new era, and with the internet, it's no longer possible for individual countries to ban or censor books. As adults in a free country, don't we have a right to read or watch whatever we want?

I just started to get very interested in this subject, as you may tell from some of my posts. Does anyone have any other books they could recommend?
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Old 05-11-2006, 08:45 PM   #56
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Quote:
Does anyone have any other books they could recommend?
If you're interested in reading fiction involving the old religion, The Mists of Avalon is a pretty good book. It's a retelling of the Arthur myths, but there are some good bits comparing the old ways to Christianity and how the Catholic adoration of Mary is nothing but worship of the Goddess in a different package--at least, according to the story.
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Old 05-11-2006, 09:19 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally posted by Teta040
[B]
It's fascinating how this has shown up in even children's literature. Who here has read Philip Pullman's "The Golden Compass" series? (or "the Lyra books" as I call them.) The heroes are witches who care for the earth, and the villians are not only Catholics but actual ANGELS who aid those who desecrate it. You find it very hard not to take the side of the "environmentalists" in Pullman's debate. Read the series: it's a heady, intoxicating, even dangerous brew. If you think DVC is controversial, this might put that to shame--or at least give it a run for its money. /B]
Yeah, no shit. Every time I read a book about fantasy or religion that's supposedly controversial, I'm left thinking "Good God, what would these people say if they every read Pullman?!?" Come to think of it though, I'd rather his books stay out of the limelight where they can be read and appreciated by those who can discern them.
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Old 05-11-2006, 11:01 PM   #58
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I read the second Pullman book in His Dark Materials series, The Subtle Knife when I was 12......my dad got me at as a Christmas present...I think I was 12 hmm anyway....I can honestly say at that time the book freaked me out, 'The enemy is God??!!?' bit really ruffled my feathers, twas a brilliant read, and I did love it at the time, but it really sat uneasily with me.....I don't think my dad knew what it was about properly, he just read the back likely...otherwise I don't think he would have got it for me...or maybe he did, as i'm pretty sure he knows who Pullman is and what he is about

Anyway at the time I was a bit too wary of reading the first and third books, but I should get round to them as I really did love the Subtle Knife.
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Old 05-11-2006, 11:26 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally posted by Earnie Shavers


That's what casting Tom Hanks will get you.
Yep.

I'll probably see the movie...I enjoyed the book a lot just as a fun quick read. I did find parts of it interesting in terms of the history of the church, only because I know next to nothing about that so I liked reading what was at least one perspective on it. The only other book I've read by him was Angels and Demons, and I think I prefer the Da Vinci Code above that one.

good thread though, i want to attempt to check out some of the other authors mentioned here sometime this summer.
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Old 05-11-2006, 11:43 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally posted by LJT
I read the second Pullman book in His Dark Materials series, The Subtle Knife when I was 12......my dad got me at as a Christmas present...I think I was 12 hmm anyway....I can honestly say at that time the book freaked me out, 'The enemy is God??!!?' bit really ruffled my feathers, twas a brilliant read, and I did love it at the time, but it really sat uneasily with me.....I don't think my dad knew what it was about properly, he just read the back likely...otherwise I don't think he would have got it for me...or maybe he did, as i'm pretty sure he knows who Pullman is and what he is about

Anyway at the time I was a bit too wary of reading the first and third books, but I should get round to them as I really did love the Subtle Knife.
Wait, you've only read the middle one? How does it make any sense?

I think the first one was read to me when I was about 10 or so. It takes a while, probably halfway into the second book, before you start to catch on what the real premis is (his whole notion of who God really is). For kids who can't understand the theology behind it, they are still great reads for the surface plot line alone.

Someday I'd like to read some CS Lewis and then The Amber Spyglass in the same week...
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