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Old 02-24-2009, 03:55 PM   #76
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im glad..i seen a pic of some of those girls & it scared me..i dont know how they were staying alive..poor girls
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Old 08-26-2009, 11:40 AM   #77
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The model in Glamour Magazine-of course the original picture in the magazine was 3 by 3




Is TV finally accepting average-sized women?
Larger figures fill the screen, but focus of shows remains on weight
By Martha Waggoner
The Associated Press
updated 2:22 p.m. ET, Tues., Aug 25, 2009

RALEIGH, N.C. - Ask model and fashion designer Emme whether television and other media are more accepting of plus-size people, and she quickly corrects you.

"Average women," she says.

The host of the new Fox reality dating show, "More to Love," has been on this campaign since the mid-1990s, when she began telling full-size women to be more accepting of themselves. In her latest venture, she guides a 6-foot-3, 330-pound man as he chooses among 20 women who wear sizes ranging from 14 to 22.

Television is suddenly filled with images of full-figured people — real and fictional — although not as everyday people just living their lives. The shows focus on their size — on "More to Love," the contestants' height and weight, and that of the bachelor, were flashed on the screen as they were introduced in the first episode.

Oxygen's "Dance Your Ass Off" features 12 contestants, weighing a total of 3,000 pounds, who lose weight through dancing, and Lifetime's "Drop Dead Diva" is about a model-wannabe who dies and comes back as plus-size attorney.

The Style Network's reality show "Ruby" is in its second season, telling the story of Ruby Gettinger of Savannah, Ga., who's down to 350 pounds from her highest weight of 716.

"I think these welcomed shows are opening the aperture," on full-size women, said Emme, whose size ranges from a 12/14 to a 14/16. "These are fun shows to watch, and they are really taking the perspective of the full-sized woman and bringing it into the type of package people can relate to."

Some fashion magazines are ahead of the curve — so to speak — on featuring plus-size models. Glamour became serious about it in the past five years, featuring Queen Latifah on the cover in May 2004, said Cindi Leive, the magazine's executive editor. In the past six to 12 months, "there is just more and more of a hunger among women to see images of women that look and feel real.

"There's a sense that being a sort of cookie cutter, homogenous standard of what's beautiful has started to feel a little bit dated," Leive said.

‘I love the woman on p 194’
But the reaction to the 3-inch-by-3-inch photograph on page 194 of the September issue surprised even Leive. "I am gasping with delight," one reader wrote. "I love the woman on p 194," someone else wrote.

Model Lizzi Miller, a 20-year-old who wears a size 12/14, is shown in sideways pose, her arms covering her breasts, only the string of a string bikini visible at the waist. The shocker: Her belly hangs over the string and rests just a bit on her thighs. Not only that, but she's laughing AS IF SHE DOESN'T EVEN KNOW.

"There's a roll in her belly that looks like every woman over the age of 16," Leive said. "And there she is, looking happy and confident and like she loves life and like she's the sexiest thing in the world."

If people do relate to the shows — and Fox hasn't decided whether to renew "More to Love" — it may be because they reflect the image that Americans see in the mirror. The average U.S. woman wears a size 14, and an estimated 56 percent of American women wear plus sizes, which start at size 14 or 16, depending on the brand.

But not everyone is getting on the curves-are-better wagon train. Who can forget the uproar about Jessica Simpson, whose true crime was one of fashion — wearing unattractive, high-waisted jeans? Or Jennifer Love Hewitt defending her bikini look with words that never should have to be uttered — "A size 2 is not fat!"

Women who are the presumed demographic for the shows aren't always with the program either.

Lesley Kinzel, a 32-year-old from Boston who runs a Web site called fatshionista, said while she's pleased that television is more willing to show women her size (24/26), she's not happy with the portrayal of women on "More to Love," which she says features "a ridiculous amount of crying." And don't even ask about "Dance Your Ass Off" with its focus on weight loss.

"More to Love" is "reinforcing the stereotype of miserable, crying fat woman who hates herself," Kinzel says. "That's not my life and that's not the life of my friends."

Forty-one-year-old Cynthia Deis of Raleigh, N.C., who wears a size 16 to 18, says she's just not interested in a show about losing weight or focused on a character's weight: "Why can't it just be a story about a woman who's big and happens to have three girlfriends who she goes out to drink with ...?"

SallyAnn Salsano, executive producer of both "More to Love" and "Dance Your Ass Off" believes the shows present positive images of full-figured people, although from different perspectives. "More to Love" focuses on people who are more comfortable with their weight, while "Dance Your Ass Off" is about people ready to make a change, she says. (Although some of the women on "More to Love" sure seemed unsteady as they cried and said they had never been on a date.)

Salsano, who says she struggles with her own weight, worked previously on "The Bachelor," where both the man and the contestants are pretty much physically perfect.

"When we were casting girls, someone would say, 'that girl's a little too thick,'" Salsano said. "And I would think, I would kill to look like her."

So when Mike Fleiss, creator of "The Bachelor" and "More to Love," came calling again, she was more than ready. "We're finally getting a show for people like us," she recalled him saying.

Still, even host Emme acknowledges that in the best of all possible worlds, the contestants would represent all sizes. And many hope for a future where size isn't such a big deal.

When Glamour recently did a swimsuit fashion shoot with full-figured model Crystal Renn and the copy didn't mention her size, readers loved it, Leive said.

"That is something that is new," she said of the lack of editorial comment. "And women are ready to see that happen."
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:23 PM   #78
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The model in Glamour Magazine-of course the original picture in the magazine was 3 by 3



I've been reading about this on Jezebel, and I saw the model and Glamour's editor appear on CNN the other night. Isn't it a gorgeous picture? She looks so happy and confident and sexy.
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Old 08-28-2009, 10:54 AM   #79
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Thanks for commenting

Yes it is a gorgeous picture- I Googled for some other photos of her and she's beautiful
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Old 10-01-2009, 02:04 PM   #80
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In the Nov issue of Glamour on stands next week

On the C.L.: Are You Ready to Start a Body Image Revolution? Oh, Wait--You Already Did!: Vitamin G: Health & Fitness: glamour.com

slideshow

Supermodels Who Aren't Superthin: Meet the Women Who Proudly Bared it All: Health & Fitness: glamour.com

Those are some gorgeous women
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Old 10-01-2009, 03:51 PM   #81
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article from today's USA Today

USATODAY.com - Do thin models warp girls' body image?

I read in People Magazine that a size zero is now big on Kate Bosworth because she has gotten so thin



The promotion of the thin, sexy ideal in our culture has created a situation where the majority of girls and women don't like their bodies," says body-image researcher Sarah Murnen, professor of psychology at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. "And body dissatisfaction can lead girls to participate in very unhealthy behaviors to try to control weight."

Girls today, even very young ones, are being bombarded with the message that they need to be super-skinny to be sexy, says psychologist Sharon Lamb, co-author of Packaging Girlhood: Rescuing Our Daughters From Marketers' Schemes.

It used to be that women would only occasionally see rail-thin models, such as Twiggy, the '60s fashion icon. "But now they see them every day. It's the norm," Lamb says, from ads, catalogs and magazines to popular TV shows such as America's Next Top Model and Project Runway. "They are seeing skinny models over and over again."

On top of that, gaunt images of celebrities such as Nicole Richie and Kate Bosworth are plastered on magazine covers, she says.
Obviously, anorexia is a problem and anyone afflicted should get help. BUT, you know what is a MUCH worse problem in America? OBESITY!!! We are the fattest nation in the world, and we're a country of overweight couch potatoes. And we're only getting fatter. It leads to diabetes, heart disease, and all sorts of chronic health problems. Many, many, many more people suffer from obesity than from anorexia in the U.S., and that's where the spotlight really needs to be shone.
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Old 10-01-2009, 03:56 PM   #82
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Of course obesity is a problem, but it's not an issue of anorexia vs obesity and which has the greatest number of sufferers. The issue here is the fact that these super thin models (and the magazines and the catwalks and the designers, etc.) are promoting the idea that any woman over a size 6 is "plus size" or obese, and that's ludicrous.

From the Glamour article. Don't mean to suggest that this is what you were suggesting but I'm sure some people would think that way..I'm also realistic enough to realize that many men and women would say that these women are not attractive/as attractive because of their size/weight.

Is showing larger-size women...unhealthy? It's a serious question: Amid the cheering for Lizzie Miller on glamour.com was a distinct strain of criticism from readers who worried the photo promoted obesity. First things first: Lizzie's not obese. (At 180 and 5'11, she's maybe a couple of pounds overweight.) But more than that, I don't buy that showing women in a variety of sizes will discourage heavier ones from maintaining a healthy weight. Glamour assistant editor Margarita Bertsos--who wrote about her own 75-pound weight loss for Glamour--said it best: "This photo in no way sends a message to me that I should quit taking care of my body... It has the complete opposite effect on me, reminding me to love myself, treat myself well (and that INCLUDES a healthy diet and exercise), and showing me that I can and should smile in my nakedness and belly rolls, because I'm worthy of that kind of that unabashed self-love right this second. We all are!" Amen.

To be clear, I'm not on the "real women have curves" bandwagon here, arguing that only bodies like Lizzie's are "real"--and that slender women are all unreal waifs who should just eat a cheeseburger and get over themselves. Turning the tables so we can bash one type instead of another isn't the answer. Celebrating the fact that we're all born different is. Think about it: In real life, women of all shapes and sizes have crazy sex appeal and killer confidence. Why should our own pages look any different?

We'll do our best to live up to this standard in the future: shooting models who diverge in every way from the cookie-cutter norm. Is it a retreat from fantasy? Of course not: If we wanted unadulterated reality, we could just print everyone's driver's-license picture. But I happen to think that a fantasy every reader can have a piece of is the most powerful fantasy of all. Thank you for encouraging us to try to provide it, and for pointing the way forward here. Your words inspire me daily.

Now tell me, what did you think when you first saw the group photo above? And how much reality, and how much fantasy, do you want in a magazine, and from the media?
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Old 10-03-2009, 10:30 AM   #83
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Thanks for commenting

Yes it is a gorgeous picture- I Googled for some other photos of her and she's beautiful
I agree. She is a lovely young woman. I think for too long that women have been told by the media, mags, etc. That we are not acceptable, no matter what size we are. I tell my grand daughter, all the time. She is beautiful. And not because of the color of her eyes, or how tall she is. But, because of her inner light and the kindness she shows to others.

All women and men are beautiful. That's a given. And we come in all colors and sizes.
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Old 10-03-2009, 10:44 AM   #84
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Of course obesity is a problem, but it's not an issue of anorexia vs obesity and which has the greatest number of sufferers. The issue here is the fact that these super thin models (and the magazines and the catwalks and the designers, etc.) are promoting the idea that any woman over a size 6 is "plus size" or obese, and that's ludicrous.

From the Glamour article. Don't mean to suggest that this is what you were suggesting but I'm sure some people would think that way..I'm also realistic enough to realize that many men and women would say that these women are not attractive/as attractive because of their size/weight.

Is showing larger-size women...unhealthy? It's a serious question: Amid the cheering for Lizzie Miller on glamour.com was a distinct strain of criticism from readers who worried the photo promoted obesity. First things first: Lizzie's not obese. (At 180 and 5'11, she's maybe a couple of pounds overweight.) But more than that, I don't buy that showing women in a variety of sizes will discourage heavier ones from maintaining a healthy weight. Glamour assistant editor Margarita Bertsos--who wrote about her own 75-pound weight loss for Glamour--said it best: "This photo in no way sends a message to me that I should quit taking care of my body... It has the complete opposite effect on me, reminding me to love myself, treat myself well (and that INCLUDES a healthy diet and exercise), and showing me that I can and should smile in my nakedness and belly rolls, because I'm worthy of that kind of that unabashed self-love right this second. We all are!" Amen.

To be clear, I'm not on the "real women have curves" bandwagon here, arguing that only bodies like Lizzie's are "real"--and that slender women are all unreal waifs who should just eat a cheeseburger and get over themselves. Turning the tables so we can bash one type instead of another isn't the answer. Celebrating the fact that we're all born different is. Think about it: In real life, women of all shapes and sizes have crazy sex appeal and killer confidence. Why should our own pages look any different?

We'll do our best to live up to this standard in the future: shooting models who diverge in every way from the cookie-cutter norm. Is it a retreat from fantasy? Of course not: If we wanted unadulterated reality, we could just print everyone's driver's-license picture. But I happen to think that a fantasy every reader can have a piece of is the most powerful fantasy of all. Thank you for encouraging us to try to provide it, and for pointing the way forward here. Your words inspire me daily.

Now tell me, what did you think when you first saw the group photo above? And how much reality, and how much fantasy, do you want in a magazine, and from the media?
Well said!

I don't think 180 pounds at 5'11 is obese. More like athletic. Like most women, I fall into the in between range. I was slender. When, I was young. I wore a size 6. But, at age 52, I weigh twenty pounds more. Than, I did twenty five years ago. Pregnancy, menopause, being on medication. Will do that. I walk two to three miles, almost everyday. Eat much healthier, than I did in my twenties. And I wear a size twelve dress. American petite sizes. At 5'4" 145 pounds. I am not overweight nor under. And years of Martial Arts training has given me, good muscle mass. Very important for women as we age.
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Old 10-03-2009, 11:55 AM   #85
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Great post, Mrs. S. Weight is not the sole measure of health. There are healthy heavier people, unhealthy thinner ones. Too many things play into health. I suspect that a lot of people are less offended by obesity as a health issue than they see it as a character issue and base their judgments on the whole person accordingly.

Obesity is a problem which shouldn't be minimized. But it should be treated as other potential health problems--between a person and his/her doctor without unsoliticited
"helpful" advice.

Beautiful pictures.
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Old 10-05-2009, 10:44 PM   #86
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Exactly......and being of a medium frame, bone size. I should weigh more than a woman who is my height and smaller built. Plus, a certain amount of body fat is necessary. Especially for women, around the hip area. It will help to protect us from fractures. Later on in life.

Medical Obesity......more than thirty pounds over, what your doctor has determined is a healthy weight for you.

Everyone is different and life style plays an important factor.
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Old 10-08-2009, 10:45 AM   #87
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^Yes-according to my size and weight I'd be considered "obese" by some standards I suppose. I'm 5' 9 1/2 and I have a "large frame". But I certainly don't consider myself to be obese or significantly overweight, and looking at me I can't imagine that anyone would think so, unless they have an insane standard of thinness that they are comparing me to. If I lost 30 pounds, first of all I can't do that and secondly I'd have to literally starve myself. I was always skinny up to a certain point in my life (it's so easy when you're much younger, well it was for me), now I just try to do the best I can with what I have. I lost 15 pounds last year and I've put some of that back on, unfortunately. I felt better physically and that's what bugs me the most.

There is no doubt in my mind that it's seen as a character issue

Image of ultra-thin Ralph Lauren model sparks outrage on Shine


Another website to garner attention for its dedication to exposing photo retouching offenses is Jezebel.com. Speaking on the subject of retouching, Jezebel editor-in-chief Anna Holmes told Yahoo!, "I don't see any point in retouching anymore ... The cat's out of the bag." She added, "I think Americans in particular are sick of having the wool pulled over their eyes ... even if it's regarding fashion models and actresses. The more they do this sort of retouching -- and then try to justify it, as the editor of SELF magazine recently did -- the less anyone believes anything else they have to say, or show. They are, in a sense, digging their own (shallow) graves."
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Old 10-08-2009, 11:54 PM   #88
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Bravo Mrs. Springsteen!

Sounds to me, as though you are athletic in built and this is a good thing. The medical weight charts, have never taken into consideration. Family genetics, life style, medical conditions, medications the patient is on or what is actually healthy, for each individual. All of us are unique.

According to those same silly weight charts. Most professional athletes are over weight. Something to think about.

It's about time. We are thought of as sexy!
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Old 10-14-2009, 09:32 AM   #89
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This is the same model who was made to look like a lollipop head by Ralph Lauren^


5'10, 120 pounds

BY Carrie Melago
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Wednesday, October 14th 2009, 8:48 AM
Filippa Hamilton says she was fired for being 'overweight.'

Ralph Lauren's clothing company fired the model whose body looked emaciated in a touched-up ad because she weighed too much, the woman told the Daily News Tuesday.

Filippa Hamilton - whose hips appeared slimmer than her head in the recent altered ad - said her contract was terminated in April because she was too heavy.

"They fired me because they said I was overweight and I couldn't fit in their clothes anymore," she said.

The 5-foot-10, 120-pound stunner was amazed to see her body digitally distorted for Ralph Lauren Blue Label.

"I was shocked to see that super skinny girl with my face," she told the Daily News. "It's very sad, I think, that Ralph Lauren could do something like that."

Hamilton, 23, worked for Ralph Lauren since about 2002 and considered the company like a second family - until she was bounced.

Then out of nowhere last week, the altered ad - which appeared only in Japan - caused a sensation and drew the ire of critics who thought it appeared sickly and unrealistic.

Polo Ralph Lauren said in a statement Tuesday night that Filippa is a "beautiful and healthy" woman but their relationship ended "as a result of her inability to meet the obligations under her contract with us."

"The image in question was mistakenly released and used in a department store in Japan and was not the approved image which ran in the U.S. We take full responsibility," the statement said. "This error has absolutely no connection to our relationship with Filippa Hamilton."

Hamilton's lawyer, Geoffrey Menin, said the image is "gross distortion of how she really looks and which we fear will be extremely damaging to her."

Hamilton is concerned about its impact on the public.

"I think they owe American women an apology, a big apology," she said. "I'm very proud of what I look like, and I think a role model should look healthy."
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Old 10-14-2009, 12:53 PM   #90
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Now Barbie has cankles...

NY Daily News Oct 13th

So now Christian Louboutin thinks Barbie has cankles.

The French stiletto maker is redesigning the classic American doll to come out here in May.

Considered a genius by Ciara and Angelina Jolie for slathering red lacquer on the bottom of 5-inch heels, Louboutin "found Barbie's ankles too fat," Women's Wear Daily reports.

Never mind that Louboutin's people now insist it's not the ankles, but the arches, that the designer is making Mattel change on his new stick-legged Barbie. This could be the biggest scandal for the toymaker since Pregnant Midge.

Does this mean Barbie's bff, "So In Style Trichelle," will soon get a tummy tuck? Will it be implants for "Fashion Fever Kira"?

This comes on the, um, heels of Louboutin's fellow Parisian Karl Lagerfeld's declaration that: "No one wants to see curvy women. You've got fat mothers with their bags of chips sitting in front of the television and saying that thin models are ugly."


Fat mothers. Nice. The Chanel designer, who just stopped carbo-loading a few years ago, was reacting to the decision of editors at the magazine Brigitte to replace skinny models with "real women" in fashion shoots.

Is Lagerfeld afraid his designs won't really work unless you're a size zero? How hard is it to make Lily Allen or Audrey Tautou, his spokesmodels, look good? Or Kate Moss or Nicole Kidman?

Since publication of the book "French Women Don't Get Fat," we've known that French women are thinner than American women - 9% overweight versus 60%.

If you find this galling, know that the contempt for women who don't have the bodies of girls - or even boys - isn't restricted to designers in France.

Last week, Ralph Lauren was forced to admit that his staff had severely Photoshopped model Filippa Hamilton in one of his ads after blogger Cory Doctorow humiliated him on boingboing.net

"Dude, her head's bigger than her pelvis," Doctorow exclaimed - and the outcry went viral. Ditto when Self magazine airbrushed pounds off Kelly Clarkson.

Yet in August, readers exulted when Glamour featured the photograph of model Lizzi Miller. Yes, she looks like Grace Kelly, but the tall 20-year-old is 180 pounds. She was in the nude, and the flaws showed. Young women saw something familiar: themselves, and they were happy about it.

It matters.

This month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 25% of girls in American high schools and 11% of boys reported eating disorders.

Worse, a Mayo Clinic study found anorexia is spreading to young children, with Dr. Barton Blinder reporting patients as young as 4.

The new American role models aren't fashion models on the Tic Tac-and-cigarettes diet, but athletic women like Michelle Obama.

Any designer who doesn't recognize that will be left behind as the next generation gets healthier and stronger.

By the way, didn't Lagerfeld feature fur-covered helmets as an accessory at his latest runway show? Why do we listen to this guy?
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