Is it ethical to buy a smartphone? - U2 Feedback

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Old 01-26-2012, 02:28 AM   #1
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Is it ethical to buy a smartphone?

This is a long article from the NYT about Apple, so here are selected excerpts:

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In the last decade, Apple has become one of the mightiest, richest and most successful companies in the world, in part by mastering global manufacturing. Apple and its high-technology peers — as well as dozens of other American industries — have achieved a pace of innovation nearly unmatched in modern history.

However, the workers assembling iPhones, iPads and other devices often labor in harsh conditions, according to employees inside those plants, worker advocates and documents published by companies themselves. Problems are as varied as onerous work environments and serious — sometimes deadly — safety problems.

Employees work excessive overtime, in some cases seven days a week, and live in crowded dorms. Some say they stand so long that their legs swell until they can hardly walk. Under-age workers have helped build Apple’s products, and the company’s suppliers have improperly disposed of hazardous waste and falsified records, according to company reports and advocacy groups that, within China, are often considered reliable, independent monitors.

...

Within seven months last year, two explosions at iPad factories, including in Chengdu, killed four people and injured 77. Before those blasts, Apple had been alerted to hazardous conditions inside the Chengdu plant, according to a Chinese group that published that warning.

“If Apple was warned, and didn’t act, that’s reprehensible,” said Nicholas Ashford, a former chairman of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health, a group that advises the United States Labor Department. “But what’s morally repugnant in one country is accepted business practices in another, and companies take advantage of that.”

Apple is not the only electronics company doing business within a troubling supply system. Bleak working conditions have been documented at factories manufacturing products for Dell, Hewlett-Packard, I.B.M., Lenovo, Motorola, Nokia, Sony, Toshiba and others.

.....

Some former Apple executives say there is an unresolved tension within the company: executives want to improve conditions within factories, but that dedication falters when it conflicts with crucial supplier relationships or the fast delivery of new products. Tuesday, Apple reported one of the most lucrative quarters of any corporation in history, with $13.06 billion in profits on $46.3 billion in sales. Its sales would have been even higher, executives said, if overseas factories had been able to produce more.

Executives at other corporations report similar internal pressures. This system may not be pretty, they argue, but a radical overhaul would slow innovation. Customers want amazing new electronics delivered every year.

“We’ve known about labor abuses in some factories for four years, and they’re still going on,” said one former Apple executive who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity because of confidentiality agreements. “Why? Because the system works for us. Suppliers would change everything tomorrow if Apple told them they didn’t have another choice.”

“If half of iPhones were malfunctioning, do you think Apple would let it go on for four years?” the executive asked.


...

Last year, the company conducted 229 audits. There were slight improvements in some categories and the detected rate of core violations declined. However, within 93 facilities, at least half of workers exceeded the 60-hours-a-week work limit. At a similar number, employees worked more than six days a week. There were incidents of discrimination, improper safety precautions, failure to pay required overtime rates and other violations. That year, four employees were killed and 77 injured in workplace explosions.

“If you see the same pattern of problems, year after year, that means the company’s ignoring the issue rather than solving it,” said one former Apple executive with firsthand knowledge of the supplier responsibility group. “Noncompliance is tolerated, as long as the suppliers promise to try harder next time. If we meant business, core violations would disappear.”

Apple says that when an audit reveals a violation, the company requires suppliers to address the problem within 90 days and make changes to prevent a recurrence. “If a supplier is unwilling to change, we terminate our relationship,” the company says on its Web site.

The seriousness of that threat, however, is unclear. Apple has found violations in hundreds of audits, but fewer than 15 suppliers have been terminated for transgressions since 2007, according to former Apple executives.

...

Apple’s efforts have spurred some changes. Facilities that were reaudited “showed continued performance improvements and better working conditions,” the company wrote in its 2011 supplier responsibility progress report. In addition, the number of audited facilities has grown every year, and some executives say those expanding efforts obscure year-to-year improvements.

...

“We could have saved lives, and we asked Apple to pressure Foxconn, but they wouldn’t do it,” said the BSR consultant, who asked not to be identified because of confidentiality agreements. “Companies like H.P. and Intel and Nike push their suppliers. But Apple wants to keep an arm’s length, and Foxconn is their most important manufacturer, so they refuse to push.”

...

Apple typically asks suppliers to specify how much every part costs, how many workers are needed and the size of their salaries. Executives want to know every financial detail. Afterward, Apple calculates how much it will pay for a part. Most suppliers are allowed only the slimmest of profits.

So suppliers often try to cut corners, replace expensive chemicals with less costly alternatives, or push their employees to work faster and longer, according to people at those companies.

“The only way you make money working for Apple is figuring out how to do things more efficiently or cheaper,” said an executive at one company that helped bring the iPad to market. “And then they’ll come back the next year, and force a 10 percent price cut.”

...

“You can set all the rules you want, but they’re meaningless if you don’t give suppliers enough profit to treat workers well,” said one former Apple executive with firsthand knowledge of the supplier responsibility group. “If you squeeze margins, you’re forcing them to cut safety.”


Wintek is still one of Apple’s most important suppliers. Wintek, in a statement, declined to comment except to say that after the episode, the company took “ample measures” to address the situation and “is committed to ensuring employee welfare and creating a safe and healthy work environment.”

Many major technology companies have worked with factories where conditions are troubling. However, independent monitors and suppliers say some act differently. Executives at multiple suppliers, in interviews, said that Hewlett-Packard and others allowed them slightly more profits and other allowances if they were used to improve worker conditions.

“Our suppliers are very open with us,” said Zoe McMahon, an executive in Hewlett-Packard’s supply chain social and environmental responsibility program. “They let us know when they are struggling to meet our expectations, and that influences our decisions.”

...

“It is gross negligence, after an explosion occurs, not to realize that every factory should be inspected,” said Nicholas Ashford, the occupational safety expert, who is now at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “If it were terribly difficult to deal with aluminum dust, I would understand. But do you know how easy dust is to control? It’s called ventilation. We solved this problem over a century ago.”
There's a lot going on here.

First, let's not underestimate the nasty, brutish effects of rural poverty compared to even bad manufacturing conditions.

There's a related, but still different question about awareness of *all* Chinese manufactured goods- do we buy cheap gear from WalMart? Many (many) do. I think multinationals can deserve some respect for driving improving standards (I read that chicken de-beaking as an American agricultural practice stopped as soon as McDonalds mandated its end). The key point of this article, I think, is that it looks like Apple is slow walking its response considerably compared to other Chinese-supplied consumer electronics companies.

At the very least, I think one should be aware of not just the list price, but the standards of the company making the product you buy. There may not be clean cut options available, but at the end of the day, this statistic

Quote:
But ultimately, say former Apple executives, there are few real outside pressures for change. Apple is one of the most admired brands. In a national survey conducted by The New York Times in November, 56 percent of respondents said they couldn’t think of anything negative about Apple. Fourteen percent said the worst thing about the company was that its products were too expensive. Just 2 percent mentioned overseas labor practices.
desperately needs to change.
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:44 AM   #2
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I think if we all really knew about the true labor conditions and company ethics, etc. behind everything we buy there would be practically nothing left to buy. If we cared enough to stop buying them. Apple just hides it all behind a very glossy curtain.
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:38 PM   #3
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This speaks to a wider lack of knowledge of how we get our widgets in the West, not solely Apple products.

The entire technology sector needs to put in effort to be more transparent.

I would hazard a guess that the rare earth metals that need to be mined in Africa and China for smartphones are obtained under much crueler conditions that the conditions where the phones are made at giant factories.
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Old 01-26-2012, 06:36 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by MrsSpringsteen View Post
I think if we all really knew about the true labor conditions and company ethics, etc. behind everything we buy there would be practically nothing left to buy. If we cared enough to stop buying them. Apple just hides it all behind a very glossy curtain.
Pretty much.
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:48 PM   #5
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That said, would you rather be getting comparatively better wages to wipe iPhone screens all day long in a warm factory, or be earning next-to-nothing farming rice in the rain?

If you ask someone in rural poor China, the answer will most certainly be the higher-wage job.

The issue is not really sweatshops as they are preferable to farming for next-to-nothing. The issue is the fair treatment of employees in said sweatshops. "Fair" n this case is not up to our inflated Western standards of what a job is, I am more talking basic human right stuff.

Pulling yourself through an industrial revolution is not pretty. Just look back at all of the fiction from Victorian England.
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Old 01-29-2012, 07:24 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Canadiens1131 View Post
That said, would you rather be getting comparatively better wages to wipe iPhone screens all day long in a warm factory, or be earning next-to-nothing farming rice in the rain?
No. Would you?
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Old 01-29-2012, 07:29 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mobvok View Post
At the very least, I think one should be aware of not just the list price, but the standards of the company making the product you buy. There may not be clean cut options available, but at the end of the day, this statistic

desperately needs to change.
Or, alternatively, capitalism is fundamentally an exploitative system and is not capable of reform.
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Old 01-29-2012, 08:12 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by financeguy View Post
No. Would you?
Don't think it was a yes or no question


edit: Oh wait! I see what you did there
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