Is Britain the NWO's test state? - U2 Feedback

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Old 10-25-2008, 04:50 PM   #1
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Is Britain the NWO's test state?

Britain's freedoms under threat from 'Big Brother security state', warns Director of Public Prosecutions | Mail Online

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The chief prosecutor has warned the surveillance society is threatening to 'break the back of freedom'.

Sir Ken Macdonald, Director of Public Prosecutions, said the state was poised to take powers to keep information on everyone and 'we might end up living with something we can't bear.'

His message - delivered ten days before he steps down as head of the Crown Prosecution Service - was a parting shot at ministers who aim to make every phone call, email, test message and internet visit available to police and security services.

Sir Ken said: 'We need to take very great care not to fall into a way of life in which freedom's back is broken by the relentless pressure of a security state.'
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Old 10-25-2008, 06:24 PM   #2
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It doesn't seem like a top down imposition, it seems more bottom up, freedoms are taken away piece by piece with the peoples blessing (after all, if you have nothing to hide).
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Old 10-25-2008, 08:01 PM   #3
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It doesn't seem like a top down imposition, it seems more bottom up, freedoms are taken away piece by piece with the peoples blessing (after all, if you have nothing to hide).
I would tend to disagree, the fact that a section of the population are easily led by tabloid media hysteria does not imply that the first impetus towards statism (and worse) actually comes from the citizenry at large, I think it is much more likely that this is 'top down', frankly.

If we look at the commments by the former UK DPP - comments that he only felt free to make once he had left the position - then I think his words are aimed much more at his fellow members of the establishment rather than the average 'Joe Soap'.
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Old 10-25-2008, 08:17 PM   #4
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I think there is a degree of complicity by the population, in public debates on issues of internet censorship in Australia the discussion has two sides, those that think that internet porn is the equivalent of child porn and must all be blocked, and those who seem to agree in principle but don't think the technology is quite there yet. Few defend the principles of free speech or free expression, the right to publish and disseminate unpopular content or ideas, it just becomes a question of logistics.

If it's a form of complicity it may be passive, but it's a failure that most people seem to be alright with censorship (and worse). Exploiting a populations desire for security is an offer too good for politicians to refuse and is to be expected, although there may be a difference in that in Australia the government is taking up issues following media scares whereas in the UK ideas seem to get floated in anticipation.

In the long run we are rooted, freedoms aren't given back once they are taken away and there is a never ending list of outrages to be "solved" with state force.
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Old 10-25-2008, 08:31 PM   #5
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I think there is a degree of complicity by the population, in public debates on issues of internet censorship in Australia the discussion has two sides, those that think that internet porn is the equivalent of child porn and must all be blocked, and those who seem to agree in principle but don't think the technology is quite there yet. Few defend the principles of free speech or free expression, the right to publish and disseminate unpopular content or ideas, it just becomes a question of logistics.
But have there been recent prosecutions for possession of adult porn in Australia? I know that in Ireland 'hard core' pornography is still technically illegal, but in practice the police do not prosecute apart from child porn. I think that if I went down to my local police station and reported a friend for looking at adult porn on his computer, they would fall on the floor laughing.

In terms of the social forces wishing to outlaw pornography 'for the good of the nation' - over here, we have on the right wing, the traditional Catholic anti-sex mentality, and on the other hand we have the no-doubt well meaning left wing feminist Labour types (see here, for example:-
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Labour Women will continue to demand that trafficking, prostitution and pornography are treated as violence against women and women trafficked, prostituted and involved in pornography are treated as victims.
http://www.labour.ie/women/policy/. Interesting to note that pornography is to be viewed on exactly the same moral level as trafficking and prostitution.) - I suspect there are similar lobby groups in Australia - I suspect, however, they are not particularly representative of the population at large, in Ireland or Australia.

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In the long run we are rooted, freedoms aren't given back once they are taken away and there is a never ending list of outrages to be "solved" with state force.
Very true, and the very essence of bureaucracy is to seek more power for itself. Which, in my view, lends weight to the 'top-down' rather than the 'bottom-up' argument.
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Old 10-31-2008, 09:11 PM   #6
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March of the dustbin Stasi: Half of councils use anti-terror laws to watch people putting rubbish out on the wrong day | Mail Online
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