Inside the dangerously empty lives of teenage girls - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-09-2010, 08:05 PM   #1
Refugee
 
AliEnvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 2,320
Local Time: 09:51 PM
Inside the dangerously empty lives of teenage girls

Spotted this magazine cover in the supermarket yesterday so found the article online. Do you think it's exaggerated or a fair portrayal?

Inside the dangerously empty lives of teenage girls - Books, The Interview - Macleans.ca

A few points struck me as expressing the performance aspect of sexuality as potentially damaging (not empowering) that I couldn't quite put my finger on when reacting to the girls gone wild article in the bi thread.
__________________

AliEnvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 08:14 PM   #2
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Kieran McConville's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Kony Island Baby
Posts: 10,190
Local Time: 07:51 AM
Christ, who knows. Maybe it's more a case of 'Inside the Dangerously Empty Lives and Minds of (Some) Teenage Girls (And Boys)
__________________

Kieran McConville is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 08:25 PM   #3
Blue Crack Distributor
 
corianderstem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 64,498
Local Time: 02:51 PM
^^Yeah, that sounds about right. Haven't people for generations been wringing their hands over the horrifying state of the teenaged life?
corianderstem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 08:30 PM   #4
ONE
love, blood, life
 
financeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ireland
Posts: 10,122
Local Time: 10:51 PM
I think that the media environment has become much more sexualised than when most of us on the forum were growing up. If you look at pop music, the videos and lyrics have become blatantly sexual whereas, previously, it was hinted at. I personally think Lady Gaga is a great artist and musician, but I'm not sure if she is the best role model to be presenting to teenage girls. Madonna's book back in '91 was a big scandal but now if such a book was released it would barely raise an eyebrow.

As regards the article, the stats on cutting/burning are in themselves deeply troubling.
financeguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 08:35 PM   #5
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 04:51 PM
I think if this guy were just a researcher, I'd be less skeptical. He's got books to sell
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 08:50 PM   #6
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 31,721
Local Time: 05:51 PM
Quote:
Dr. Leonard Sax is a family physician and founder of the National Association for Single Sex Public Education, who lives in Pennsylvania with his wife and daughter. The author of two previous books concerning the effects of gender differences on learning, Sax argues in his new book, Girls on the Edge, that today’s teens and tweens look confident on the outside but have a dangerously fragile sense of self.

first, he's an advocate for single-sex education -- that's an agenda right there.

and the last line seems to describe teenagers as they've always been.

the stuff about the blow jobs is interesting, but i think there are many different ways to interpret the behavior, and ultimately, no one is getting pregnant from a blow job.

pressure, however, is very real, and increasing, and something that i don't think people had to deal with as much 20, 30, and 40 years ago. especially not girls from 40 years ago, which i think is the big thing. now, more than 50% of college students are women. perhaps stress and anxiety is the price of equality?
Irvine511 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 09:07 PM   #7
ONE
love, blood, life
 
financeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ireland
Posts: 10,122
Local Time: 10:51 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irvine511 View Post
first, he's an advocate for single-sex education -- that's an agenda right there.
Ad-hominem - but everyone has an agenda.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irvine511 View Post
and the last line seems to describe teenagers as they've always been.
Not really, there was no such thing as a teenager until James Dean invented the idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irvine511 View Post
the stuff about the blow jobs is interesting, but i think there are many different ways to interpret the behavior, and ultimately, no one is getting pregnant from a blow job.
Yes, but that is hardly the most astounding thing in the article is it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irvine511 View Post
pressure, however, is very real, and increasing, and something that i don't think people had to deal with as much 20, 30, and 40 years ago. especially not girls from 40 years ago, which i think is the big thing. now, more than 50% of college students are women. perhaps stress and anxiety is the price of equality?
When one third of teenage girls cut themselves, then it's just a price of equality?
financeguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 09:09 PM   #8
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 04:51 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by financeguy View Post

When 25% of teenage girls cut themselves, then it's just a price of equality?
Theres no way thats true
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 09:12 PM   #9
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 04:51 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by financeguy View Post
Ad-hominem
not if theres a conflict of interest
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 09:16 PM   #10
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 31,721
Local Time: 05:51 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by financeguy View Post
When one third of teenage girls cut themselves, then it's just a price of equality?


i thought it was 1 in 5? it still seems a bit out-there.

but i do think kids are more and more pressured today than ever before, and that girls face pressures today that they didn't 30 years ago.

i also think this guy really, really underestimates what's going on with teenage boys, pretending that they're just a bunch of easygoing goofballs. i certainly wasn't.
Irvine511 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 09:16 PM   #11
ONE
love, blood, life
 
financeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ireland
Posts: 10,122
Local Time: 10:51 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Turkey View Post
Theres no way thats true
Is it also untrue that that the usage of anti-depressants in the US has doubled in a decade?
financeguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 09:21 PM   #12
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 04:51 PM
Its a culture that over prescribes medication. That doesnt surprise me at all
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 09:26 PM   #13
ONE
love, blood, life
 
financeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ireland
Posts: 10,122
Local Time: 10:51 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Turkey View Post
Its a culture that over prescribes medication. That doesnt surprise me at all
Well, I'd tend to disagree. I would tend to argue that the structure of "modern life" is in itself alienating, and that it is this - more so than a culture of over-medication within some branches of the medical profession - that causes the sense of, for want of a better expression, disconnectedness, that causes so many people to require a little pharmaceutical aid now and again.

It is the system that is wrong - not the people.
financeguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 10:22 PM   #14
Neon Zebra
 
beegee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: southern nevada
Posts: 10,604
Local Time: 02:51 PM
I have a sixteen year old daughter.

I honestly don't even know where to begin with this atricle.

So much of it just isn't true.
beegee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 10:26 PM   #15
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 31,721
Local Time: 05:51 PM
but it will sell papers.
Irvine511 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 10:33 PM   #16
Blue Crack Supplier
 
coolian2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Hamilton (No longer STD capital of NZ)
Posts: 42,934
Local Time: 10:51 AM
kids these days
coolian2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 07:55 AM   #17
Blue Crack Addict
 
Liesje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the dog house
Posts: 19,563
Local Time: 05:51 PM
I clicked the link and didn't get farther than the three pics at the top. What the hell does that GUY know about being a teenage girl?

I am 25 so my teenage years are still fresh in my mind. Yes, there was some stress, some anxiety, but never anything that would scar me for life or even affect my mood more than a week or so. Maybe I was just lucky....but I was certainly not the star athlete or in the popular clique, for the most part I did my own thing. I went to school, did what I needed to do there (I was a good student but I didn't work that hard, it came easy to me), went to work or gymnastics, and then spent my free time hanging out with my close friends. My bubble was relatively small but my worldview and perception of myself was shaped by those close to me (family and friends), not by "culture" or "the media" or "celebrities" or any of those things commonly blamed for ruining the lives of teenage girls. I think I got by unscathed because I had a tight group of girlfriends - not without problems or drama - but we did not pressure each other about sex or looks or drugs or anything like that. To be honest most people I knew that had issues with "self-objectification" brought it upon themselves.
Liesje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 08:50 AM   #18
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 25,992
Local Time: 05:51 PM
I would tend to think that self objectification is brought about by some parents too-by allowing all of the things and behaviors that lead to that, and just by inaction and lack of involvement. I'm out of touch with teen girls but the few I know and have observed, that does happen. I can never figure out how they allow it, it's as if they've given up and just surrendered to it. Or the kids are just calling the shots.

I do think this is definitely true for many girls:

We have girls who are now putting on a pretense of adult sexuality that they couldn’t possibly feel, and the danger of putting on a show is that you lose touch with your own sexuality. You’re wearing a mask, and when you take off the mask, there’s not a face there. Another thing that’s happening is the acceleration of the onset of puberty. Girls are losing what psychologists used to call middle childhood: eight to 12 years of age, which is the age of Pippi Longstocking and Harriet the Spy, the time for girls to have adventures and develop a sense of who they are as people without worrying about whether they’re hot.

It is so different for teen girls now than it was for me-with the looks/image/clothing issues to such an extreme (all teen girls have those issues and I still did ) and the online stuff and sexuality stuff and all of the related issues. I wouldn't want to be a teenage girl now, no way. I was allowed to have that middle childhood and to be a kid without worrying about being "hot". Even as a teen I had that. I do think that sexualization of preteen (and even younger) girls is very dangerous. So much of it is about parental involvement as well-articles like this make it seem as if parental influence is non-existent.
MrsSpringsteen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 09:36 AM   #19
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 31,721
Local Time: 05:51 PM
^ this i can agree with.

but the other issue is that, at least in my understanding, puberty hits earlier now than it did in the past. this isn't the media. kids' bodies are changing sooner. could this have something to do with it?

but then again, i remember being in 4th grade, 10 years old, and there was enormous amounts of curiosity about boyfriends/girlfriends, who might be "going out" and who dressed well, had the right shoes, etc. there did to be some girls who i remember at that age who seemed already aware of themselves as females/future women, as opposed to just kids, but they struck me as not being representative of the mainstream. they were into the music, the fashion, and they thought their lives were supposed to be all drama, like the "Pappa Don't Preach" video. though today i'm sure it's all about Twilight or whatever.

so i think it's been around for a while. i think some kids take the media more seriously than others. and i think the best thing you can do for your child is to continuously remind them, "it's only a movie/it's only a song/it's only a video," and that these things are not real life.
Irvine511 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 09:53 AM   #20
Blue Crack Addict
 
Liesje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the dog house
Posts: 19,563
Local Time: 05:51 PM
I don't know, 150 years ago I would have felt pressured to be married and having kids by the time I was 17..... I think there are ALWAYS pressures and that one is not necessarily worse than any other, it just changes over time... I for one am really glad I was a teenager in the 2000s and not 1900 or 1800. It's the same old debate, are we really worse off? Are there more "bad" kids now than 100, 200 years ago? I don't think so, not better/worse, just different. "The grass is always greener".....

Not to be too TMI but I went through puberty at age 11 and I don't really think it had much influence on anything other than just having to deal with that aspect of being a girl. I had friends who had it younger than I did, and some not until age 16. I was self conscious about it at first but what girl isn't? It didn't effect how I felt about whether or not I wanted to have sex or how I looked at myself in the mirror. If anything, I felt lucky to have started early, so that I was totally used to it by the time I started highschool (age 13) and also basically full grown. I've not grown more than a half inch since I started high school and fall back to the same weight/condition when I'm active.

But you guys are probably right about parental involvement. My parents were not concerned with how we looked or dressed or whether we had boyfriends/girlfriends. They just kind of let things happen and went with the flow. I am very different from both my siblings so the rules and interactions with each child were different.
__________________

Liesje is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com
×