Gaddafi 'may have fled Libya' as Tripoli burns - Page 4 - U2 Feedback

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Old 02-24-2011, 11:54 PM   #46
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I don't think Gaddafi can survive this, and I don't think he will hesitate to use any tactic to cling to power.

Look for a showdown in Tripoli.
Former Libyan Diplomat: Killing Gadhafi Only Way to End Violence
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Old 02-27-2011, 06:06 PM   #47
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Christian Science Monitor, Feb. 27
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...Qaddafi’s writ now seems mostly confined to Tripoli and his hometown of Sirte. Between the two locations, he appears to have at least 10,000 heavily men under his command, and they’ve already shown a willingness to use heavy machine gunfire and anti-aircraft guns on lightly armed protesters.

Unlike in Egypt or Tunisia, two neighboring countries that drove out their dictators with relatively little bloodshed, Qaddafi’s Libya doesn’t have true functioning state institutions. While in those two countries a long-time ruling elite remains largely in control of state bureaucracies (angering many democracy protesters) when Qaddafi goes, there will be an enormous vacuum.

Libya’s constitution? Qaddafi’s own “Green Book,” a rambling screed about something called democratic socialism. Here in Benghazi and the rest of the east, the book--required reading for all schoolchildren--has already been pulled from the bookshelves and in most cases burned.

Today, a group of largely self-appointed leaders in eastern Libya tried to address that looming vacuum by declaring a symbolic transitional government. But the manner in which it was announced, and paucity of detail about it, are also indications of the challenges to come. On Saturday night, Mustafa Abd el-Jalil, Qaddafi’s former justice minister and the first government official to break with the regime when the uprising began, told Al Jazeera he would be named an interim prime minister of sorts. He was speaking from the eastern city of Al-Baida. His role, he said, would be to talk to foreign governments and provide a transitional head of state when Qaddafi falls. He insisted his post would be temporary and said elections would be held within three months of the fall of Tripoli. This morning, Libyans working with the transitional city council in Benghazi--which was declared in Libya's second-largest city last Friday--confirmed his comments were accurate. But then they backtracked, implying that it would all be sewn up by an afternoon press conference today. The press conference happened, but Jalil wasn’t there. Instead Abdelhafiz Ghogha, a lawyer who was arrested on Feb. 19 for supporting the uprising but who was released a few days later, said he had been named a spokesman for the Libyan “revolution,” and insisted there was no transitional government. It all left the impression of strong internal disagreements among the people seeking to emerge as the leaders of what has been an almost entirely headless revolt so far. “You have to patient with us,” says one official working with the Benghazi council. “There’s no history of this kind of political organizing here. There are people with different ideas, different opinions. But we’re finding compromise.”


Tahrir Square it's not, but how else does one rebel against Muammar Qaddafi.

It's a bit surprising how rapidly so many rebels were able to get their hands on weapons.
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Old 02-28-2011, 12:50 AM   #48
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Why do you see his name spelled so many different ways?
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Old 02-28-2011, 12:52 AM   #49
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That's how you say it.
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Old 02-28-2011, 12:54 AM   #50
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Which one?

And why would that mean that's why it's spelled differently? I'm not just talking about typos or phonetic spellings by a 'layman,' it's spelled differently in the media too, right?

I swear back in the 80s when he was first in the news (that I was aware of), it was always spelled with a Q, but now I mostly see it with a G.
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Old 02-28-2011, 12:59 AM   #51
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Muammar Qaddafi would be how you say it, Muammar Gaddafi would be how it's spelled in English.

I don't know exactly why, I don't speak Arabic nor do I write it. But I vaguely understand some terms, and I notice how it's said as opposed to how it's spelled.

FWIW I'm half Egyptian, so that's where that's coming from.

EDIT: Someone feel free to correct me, but I think it has something to do with the fact that the letter in Arabic doesn't have an exact translation to English, so it's substituted.
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Old 02-28-2011, 03:52 AM   #52
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A 2009 article over at ABC counted 112 different spellings English media worldwide have used during the last decade.

When rendering into English text or speech from a language normally written in a non-Latin alphabet, translators use a standardized romanization system developed specifically for that language (this process is called 'transliteration' when done to text, 'transcription' when done to speech). Unfortunately, for almost all major languages written in non-Latin alphabets, there are multiple romanization systems in existence: one may be considered the simplest to use, another the most phonetically precise, yet another the most faithful in indicating the spelling in the original alphabet, etc. Arabic happens to have an exceptionally large number--I believe there are roughly a dozen Arabic romanization systems in regular use, though don't quote me on that. Also, to make things even more complicated, spoken Arabic varies tremendously across the Arabic-speaking world--some 'dialects' are mutually unintelligible--so, if you're transcribing as opposed to transliterating, you'll want to take that into account, too. (There is a standardized form, modern classical Arabic, which functions as a kind of lingua franca for TV, travel, etc. and is usually learnt in school. The now-famous Tahrir Square chant, "The people want the downfall of the regime," was in modern classical Arabic rather than colloquial Egyptian Arabic, which is partly why it's been embraced by protesters across the region.)

Of course, journalists don't have the time to mess around with all this, so generally they contact an expert to suggest a spelling (e.g., is it Chanukah, Hanukkah, or what? honest answer: either is "correct;" non-Hebrew speakers can't pronounce the initial guttural anyway, so why sweat it), or else, with stuff like personal or place names, they'll try to find out whether the individual or municipality in question has an official romanized form of their name they prefer. Unfortunately, Colonel Qaddafi/Gaddafi/Qadhdhafi/Khadaffy/WTF-ever has never indicated a preference--so all they can do is survey what's already out there in print, take their pick, and commit as an organization to that spelling for the time being.

cori, you're right though that 'Muammar Qaddafi' was far more dominant in US media in the 80s than any one spelling is nowadays. That's the main reason I use it--it's the first spelling I encountered, it's still in fairly wide use, and since I can't speak or read Arabic anyway, no point in pretending to have an actual informed opinion on it.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:28 AM   #53
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I consult my Associated Press Style Book for questions like this. It didn't have an entry for Gadhafi (et al), but AP Style is mentioned in this article:

Newsmangled: Gadhafi a tyrant, no matter how you spell it - thestar.com

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Newsmangled: Gadhafi a tyrant, no matter how you spell it
Published On Fri Feb 25 2011

This was a defining week for Moammar Gadhafi, the citizen-murdering, mercenary hiring, your-grandparent’s-drapes-wearing dictator of Libya. Gadhafi has ruled that country for more than four decades. Over the years, he has attracted media coverage for his support of terrorism, increasingly deranged public statements and sartorial flare.

As a result, you’d think at some point the press would have settled on the spelling of his name. Well, no such luck.

In the New York Times he is “Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi.” The Los Angeles Times calls him “Moammar Kadafi.” This paper goes with “Moammar Gadhafi,” the spelling prescribed by the Canadian Press Stylebook. The Associated Press also loves it some Moammar Gadhafi, but Reuters and the BBC call him “Muammar Gaddafi.” To get a sense of just how many ways there are to spell Gadhafi, two years ago ABC News created a list of known spellings. It featured 112 different versions including, “Mulazim Awwal Mu’ammar Muhammad Abu Minyar al-Qadhafi.”

The issue is that there isn’t a standardized way to translate Arabic names into English. (Think Al Qaeda, al-Qa’ida etc.) It’s also worth noting that the haberdashtardly dictator himself hasn’t set upon a single translation, according to the Christian Science Monitor.

“The banner at the top of his official website spells it, ‘Al Gathafi,’” it reported. “But if you go deeper into the site, you’ll see it variously rendered as ‘Al Qaddafi,’ ‘Algathafi,’ and ‘Al-Gathafi.’ Adding to the multitude of spellings is the increasingly ironically named ‘Al-Gaddafi International Prize for Human Rights.’”

The question of how to spell the deranged oil tyrant’s name has long puzzled people. It was addressed back in 1986 by Cecil Adams in his know-it-all syndicated column, “The Straight Dope.” He noted the Libyan lunatic had that year personally responded to a letter from a group of second-graders in Minnesota. Underneath his signature was the typed name “Moammar El-Gadhafi.”

“This was the first known indication of his own feelings on the subject, and the wire services and many newspapers promptly announced they would switch,” said Adams.

Twenty-five years later, wire services like Associated Press and Reuters use different spellings, and we are no closer to clarity. In an effort to provide a more accurate rendering of el colonel’s name, the ShortFormBlog suggested, “The correct spelling is ‘long-serving dictator.’”

Let’s hope we can soon change that to “imprisoned former dictator.”

Craig Silverman is editor of RegretTheError.com and the author of Regret The Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute The Press and Imperil Free Speech
Russian and Mongolian have a similar problem. English gets stuck on translations due to not having any deep guttural sounds. G, "guh" seems to be as close as we get.
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Old 02-28-2011, 11:37 AM   #54
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Cool, thanks for the explanations.
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Old 02-28-2011, 05:10 PM   #55
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Has anyone any opinions about the gig that so many popstars played for the libayan family in 2007?

Mariah, Beyonc, Usher Face Calls to Donate Qaddafi Money to Charity | Rolling Stone Music
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Old 02-28-2011, 10:25 PM   #56
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And now, after years of abuse of his people,

the West decides it is time for him to go.
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Old 02-28-2011, 11:03 PM   #57
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And now, after years of abuse of his people,

the West decides it is time for him to go.
Seems his own people came to that decision.
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Old 02-28-2011, 11:05 PM   #58
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Is there any truth to the rumor that they revolted because Gaddafi tried to regulate their salt consumption?

 
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Old 03-01-2011, 09:48 PM   #59
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According to Gaddahfi, it's because of the drugs bin Laden's putting in their milk!



I think Gaddahfi and Charlie Sheen could be good friends.
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Old 03-01-2011, 09:51 PM   #60
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Well its seems Gaddahfi's nurse is going to work for Charlie and Sheens spokesmen is going to work for Gaddahfi.

I predict Momar kicks the bucket first.
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