Feel good stories - Page 7 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-12-2012, 10:46 PM   #91
Blue Crack Addict
 
Moonlit_Angel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: In a dimension known as the Twilight Zone...do de doo doo, do de doo doo...
Posts: 19,272
Local Time: 08:54 AM
Eeeesh. Those words are chilling and make my stomach turn.

But a very interesting way to take on such a horrific topic. If it helps even one victim, that's always a good thing .
__________________

__________________
Moonlit_Angel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 11:48 PM   #92
Forum Moderator
 
yolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,471
Local Time: 03:54 PM
This is really just one of those 'interesting, yet uncategorizable' stories. Though it might make you feel good if you're fluent in more than one language.

Wired, Apr. 24
Quote:
To judge a risk more clearly, it may help to consider it in a foreign language.

A series of experiments on more than 300 people from the US and Korea found that thinking in a second language reduced deep-seated, misleading biases that unduly influence how risks and benefits are perceived. “Would you make the same decisions in a foreign language as you would in your native tongue?” asked psychologists led by Boaz Keysar of the University of Chicago in an April 18 Psychological Science study. “It may be intuitive that people would make the same choices regardless of the language they are using, or that the difficulty of using a foreign language would make decisions less systematic. We discovered, however, that the opposite is true: Using a foreign language reduces decision-making biases,” wrote Keysar’s team.

Psychologists say human reasoning is shaped by two distinct modes of thought: one that’s systematic, analytical and cognition-intensive, and another that’s fast, unconscious and emotionally charged. In light of this, it’s plausible that the cognitive demands of thinking in a non-native, non-automatic language would leave people with little leftover mental horsepower, ultimately increasing their reliance on quick-and-dirty cogitation. Equally plausible, however, is that communicating in a learned language forces people to be deliberate, reducing the role of potentially unreliable instinct. Research also shows that immediate emotional reactions to emotively charged words are muted in non-native languages, further hinting at deliberation.
I read six languages competently (don't have spoken/written fluency in all) and while this scenario isn't covered by the linked study, one thing I do notice is that when reading in a language other than English--and especially, when reading about topics I've already read extensively on in English--I'm very aware of the way metaphors embedded in the text, often quite subtle ones, direct and thus delimit the reader's perspective on the topic. I'm not talking Captain Obvious stuff like political propaganda here, I mean philosophy, personal essays, 'straight' news reporting etc. Whereas when I'm reading in English, it takes a concerted, conscious effort to notice that level of the language. I wonder if this too is a consequence of the forced "deliberation" they're describing.
__________________

__________________
yolland [at] interference.com


μελετώ αποτυγχάνειν. -- Διογένης της Σινώπης
yolland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 05:54 AM   #93
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
BonosSaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 3,566
Local Time: 10:54 AM
That's pretty interesting. (I am competent enough in several languages to convey clearly that I don't speak the language.) I did enjoy the bolded contradiction. While I don't speak any other language, I notice a little similarity when I am moving from more familiar types of prose to, say, scientific writing or legalese. It is as if the type of deliberation frees up other parts of the brain to make quick connections without baggage. Clicking.

Interesting too about the immediate emotional reactions to charged words being muted in non-native languages. I think a case can be made that it is deliberation that is muting this response. But I wonder also whether the actual native language word holds a symbolic power that the non-native word does not possess. The non-native word allows a distance more so than it requires a deliberation, frees the brain of expectation and conditioning.

This seems to fit in with the proposal of the study.
Quote:
We propose that these effects arise because a foreign language provides greater cognitive and emotional distance than a native tongue does.
However, I found this interesting also from your link.

Quote:
Recall was compared to recognition, and a variety of types of emotion words were studied, including taboo terms, and phrases likely to be learned in childhood (reprimands). Superior memory for emotion words was obtained in both the recall and recognition tasks, but this occurred in both the first and second language and indeed was stronger, for some stimuli, in the second language. This suggests that, even for bilingual speakers who acquire their second late (after age 12), words in the second language retain rich emotional associations.
Do you have a subscription to this site? I seemed to be able to only link to the abstract.
__________________
BonosSaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 05:30 PM   #94
Forum Moderator
 
yolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,471
Local Time: 03:54 PM
Yeah, sorry, I couldn't find a free source for that study. Though the Wired writer was careful to specify "immediate emotional reactions," it's still a somewhat misleading citation--that study wasn't comparing intensity of emotional response upon hearing the same words in L1 vs. L2 (though that was part of the process); rather, it was comparing the degree to which 'emotion words,' to which subjects had just been exposed, were more readily recalled/recognized afterwards than 'neutral words,' in L1 vs. L2. So, they didn't challenge earlier researchers' findings (which they summarize) that emotion words evoke a stronger response, in the moment, in L1 vs. L2. They did challenge one earlier study which had found that the memory advantage (subsequent recall/recognition) of emotion words was more pronounced for L1 than L2--they found, on the contrary, that at least for emotionally negative words, the memory advantage was more pronounced in L2; in fact, subjects actually remembered more negative words just heard in L2 than just heard in L1, so their L2 negative recall was better, period, not merely better relative to positive (about the same in both), neutral (much better in L1) or total overall word recall. They speculate that negative words may be more subject to suppression in memory in L1.

Since this isn't my field I'm unsure how significant this is, but--one thing that did seem a bit problematic to me was that they were comparing their subjects' responses to spoken words to an earlier study in which subjects were shown written words.
__________________
yolland [at] interference.com


μελετώ αποτυγχάνειν. -- Διογένης της Σινώπης
yolland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 07:13 PM   #95
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
BonosSaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 3,566
Local Time: 10:54 AM
Certainly not my field, my expertise nor my competency, but I am fascinated with language and the brain and the intertwine so any kind of study like this is welcome.

OK, rereading I do see in the part I quoted that it stressed recall/recognition over emotional response. I still find it curiously intriguing that some of of the stimuli was stronger in the second language--although I will cede to those of you here who speak other languages.
__________________
BonosSaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 11:00 AM   #96
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,999
Local Time: 09:54 AM


Abandoned Puppy Becomes Seeing-Eye Dog for Another | Video - ABC News
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 07:00 PM   #97
Acrobat
 
ladyfreckles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 402
Local Time: 07:54 AM
Don Ritchie, Angel of The Gap - who helped save 500 people from suicide - dies at 85 | News.com.au

Quote:
Mr Ritchie spent 50 years coaxing desperate people back from The Gap, the notorious cliff at Watsons Bay where hundreds have died or thought about taking their lives.
He helped save 500 despairing souls - usually with little more than compassion, a warm smile and a hot cuppa.
"Those who knew him knew he was a very strong person and a very capable person," Mr Ritchie's daughter Sue said today.
Federal MP Malcolm Turnbull, whose electorate includes The Gap, added: "A true hero, one of our greatest Australians. RIP."
Born in Vaucluse in 1926, Mr Ritchie died peacefully at home on Old South Head Road, Watsons Bay yesterday.
The former navy seaman turned life insurance salesman was never one to shout about his exploits.
He helped because he could.
Ms Ritchie said: "It was just something that he saw and that he had to do something about."
New South Wales Mental Health Minister Kevin Humphries recalled when Mr Ritchie was named a Local Hero in the 2011 Australian of the Year Awards.
"Upon accepting the award Mr Ritchie urged people to never be afraid to speak to those most in need," he said.
"Always remember the power of the simple smile, a helping hand, a listening ear and a kind word."
A funeral will be held in Sydney on Friday.
__________________
ladyfreckles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2012, 06:25 PM   #98
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,999
Local Time: 09:54 AM
Incredible



thedaily.com

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure — and for the Logan family, the treasure was hiding inside an old camera.

Addison Logan was browsing yard sales with his grandmother in Wichita, Kan., last week when an old Polaroid camera caught his eye. He bought it for $1 because he thought it was cool.

The surprise came later that day, when he opened the device and discovered a photo of his deceased uncle inside.

“I took the cartridge out and the photo was produced already,” he said.

Addison went downstairs to show his grandmother what he had found, and she couldn’t believe her eyes.

“I thought he found it somewhere in the house,” Lois Logan said. “He had no idea that that was his uncle.”

Her grandson never met his uncle Scott, who died in 1989, before his nephew was born.

“I was just blown away,” Addison said after realizing the man was his uncle.

Lois Logan recognized the other person in the photo, as well: It was her son’s old girlfriend, Susan Ely. She figures the picture was taken during Scott Logan’s senior year of high school or freshman year in college, 10 years before a car accident took his life.

Meanwhile, no one knows where the camera came from, who took the photo, or why it remained stuck in the camera for decades.

Lois Logan wondered if Addison, 13, had bought the camera from the Elys after a spring cleaning of their daughter’s old things.

“I thought that maybe we had stopped at her parents’ house,” she said. Her son, Blake Logan — Scott’s brother and Addison’s father — went back to the house where his son bought the camera later that day in hopes of finding some clues, but came back empty-handed.

The person who sold Addison the camera said he didn’t know Ely or Scott Logan, and couldn’t recall where the camera had come from. The seller admitted he likes to go to a lot of yard sales and he can’t remember when or where he picked it up — so it appears as though the miraculous photo will remain a mystery.

“It’s a very rare coincidence,” Lois Logan said.

Blake Logan has since shared the find with his late brother’s 26-year-old son, Dayne Logan, via Facebook.

Meanwhile, Addison is keeping the photo on his dresser, but doesn’t plan to use the camera to take any pictures of his own.

“It just looked like an old camera,” he said of the Polaroid. “I don’t even know how it works.”
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2012, 03:29 PM   #99
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
maycocksean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Most Important State in the Union
Posts: 4,882
Local Time: 09:54 AM
I found this story very inspiring:

Meghan Vogel, Ohio Track Star, Carries Runner Across Finish Line At State Competition (VIDEO)

To be honest, the Rush Limbaugh "criticism" of this story is a tempest in a teapot no matter which way you look at it.

Limbaugh didn't actually criticize Vogel, just the officials who did not disqualify the two girls. The people claiming Rush is characterizing her actions as weak are wrong. But his actual criticism in itself was also misplaced and overwrought as the officials chose not to disqualify them because no advantage had been gained by the assistance Vogel lent.
__________________
maycocksean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2012, 04:02 PM   #100
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,297
Local Time: 09:54 AM
I don't even think that Rush could walk two miles, let alone run the distance. That's really all I thought about his comments when I read the story.
__________________
anitram is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2012, 11:19 PM   #101
Blue Crack Addict
 
Moonlit_Angel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: In a dimension known as the Twilight Zone...do de doo doo, do de doo doo...
Posts: 19,272
Local Time: 08:54 AM
Heh. Well said. Anyone who finds something to nitpick about that story isn't worth listening to.

Thanks for sharing that story-what a really cool, classy thing to do .
__________________
Moonlit_Angel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 06:23 PM   #102
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,999
Local Time: 09:54 AM
He's got his problems, but regardless..good for him. The show probably won't last but I assume they'll still get the money.

By Tim Kenneally

The Wrap -- Forget winning; Charlie Sheen is all about giving at the moment.

The "Anger Management" star announced Monday that he will donate $1 million to the United Service Organizations (USO), which will go toward an entertainment facility for injured troops in Bethesda, Md. The donation will mark the largest single contribution from an individual in the organization's history.

"It's an honor for me to be able to give back to these men and women of the military who have done so much for all of us,” Sheen said of the donation. “They put their lives on the line for us every day, and I'm just happy that my work on 'Anger Management' can bring a little bit of relief to the troops and their families."

The actor has pledged to donate 1 percent of the profits from his FX comedy "Anger Management" to the USO, with a guaranteed $1 million minimum. The first installment of $250,000 will be donated in a private ceremony next week.
__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2012, 03:15 PM   #103
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Pearl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 5,653
Local Time: 10:54 AM
This is both a sad and a feel good story. Sad because the poor girl is battling two types of cancer and may not have much time left. But her bravery and upbeat personality is inspiring.

Talia Joy Castellano, 12-Year-Old Cancer Patient, Creates Youtube Makeup Tutorials (VIDEOS)

I pray and hope that she will somehow survive her illnesses.
__________________
Pearl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2012, 04:00 PM   #104
Blue Crack Addict
 
Moonlit_Angel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: In a dimension known as the Twilight Zone...do de doo doo, do de doo doo...
Posts: 19,272
Local Time: 08:54 AM
Cancer can go to hell. A child having to suffer that is just...wrong.

She sounds like a great kid. I really hope they can figure out something for her and she can beat the odds. Best of luck to her.
__________________
Moonlit_Angel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 12:04 PM   #105
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,999
Local Time: 09:54 AM
yahoo.com

A woman who helped a lost man ended up with a surprise $20,000 gift.

That's what happened last month when Jennifer Vasilakos guided Ty Warner when he stopped and asked for driving directions in Santa Barbara, Calif.

While Warner didn't know exactly how to get to where he was going, Vasilakos didn't realize who she was helping.

Warner is the billionaire founder of Ty Inc., the Beanie Baby company.

Vasilakos was at the intersection trying to raise $20,000 for a stem cell procedure she needs to help save her life because she suffers from kidney failure and does not qualify for a transplant.

She describes their encounter in her blog:

I often get asked by random strangers for directions. Not one to miss an opportunity, I handed him my flyer and he made a fifty dollar donation. As he drove off, I thought that was the end of our encounter... He'd returned after an hour or so. Rolling down his window, he reached out his hand and introduced himself. I immediately recognized his name. He was kind and sincere as he looked directly into my eyes... I listened as he repeated over and over that he was going to help me. That my fundraising was done. That I didn't need to worry any longer. He said he would send a check after he returned to his offices during the week.

He was true to his word. Vasilakos, an herbalist and Reiki teacher, received a package on July 16 with a $20,000 check and with a handwritten note from Warner. The note read in part, "Someone up there loves you because I was guided to meet you Saturday. I never lose my way, but fate had me lost and ask you for directions. The rest of the story I hope will be a wonderful new life for you."

"Of course I started crying, because that's what girls do," Vasilakos said. "I'm incredibly thankful to Ty Warner and to everyone who has supported me with love and prayer."

The check cleared a few weeks later and she booked a surgical procedure at an undisclosed foreign hospital to begin hematopoietic stem cell treatment. Hematopietic treatment takes a cell from the blood or bone marrow that can renew itself and develop into a variety of specialized cells.

"After I serendipitously met Jennifer, I further educated myself on her stem cell needs. I was shocked that this particular type of treatment wasn't available to her in the U.S.," Warner said in a media release. "My hope is that we can bring this lifesaving treatment to the forefront so that it can become more readily available and provide alternatives for people like Jennifer."


__________________

__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com