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Old 10-21-2011, 03:47 PM   #76
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Have you guys seen the "Yue Yue" video/story? I think it might unfortunately top anything else in this thread. I made the mistake of watching the video, hadn't heard about it before hand. That little baby....
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Old 10-25-2011, 11:02 PM   #77
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^^ The Beijing journalist Lijia Zhang had a very good guest column about 'the Yueyue story' in the Guardian (UK) over the weekend. Like many Chinese who've debated and discussed the incident online and elsewhere (it dominated China's mass media last week), she doesn't consider the bystanders' shocking indifference an isolated tragedy, but rather a symptom of a pervasive decline of public ethics in contemporary Chinese society.
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Last Thursday a two-year-old girl was run over twice, about 100 metres from her home in a hardware market district of Foshan, a prosperous city in southern China. As she lay on the ground, writhing in pain, before being hit by the second vehicle, 18 people, on their bicycles, in cars or on foot, passed by but chose to ignore her. Among them a young woman with her own child. Finally, a 58-year-old female rubbish collector came to the girl's rescue, but it was too late. By the time she was brought to the hospital, the girl Yueyue (whose name translates as Little Joy), was brain dead...None even bothered to call for emergency services.

Later, when interviewed by a journalist, one of the passersby, a middle-aged man riding a scooter, said with an uncomfortable smile on his face: "That wasn't my child. Why should I bother?" Before giving himself up to the police, the driver of the second vehicle, a van, told the media why he had run away. "If she is dead, I may pay only about 20,000 yuan. But if she is injured, it may cost me hundreds of thousands of yuan."

...The death of Yueyue [has] provoked much public outrage and a nationwide discussion about morality in today's China...There was plenty of condemnation of the cold-heartedness of the passersby. But, astonishingly, a large percentage of posters said they understood why the onlookers did not lend a helping hand. Some admitted they would do the same--for fear of getting into trouble and fear of facing another "Nanjing judge." Let me explain the story of the muddle-headed Nanjing judge. In 2006, in the capital of Jiangsu province, a young man named Peng Yu helped an old woman who had fallen on the street and took her to a hospital and waited to see if the old woman was all right. Later, however, the woman and her family accused Peng of causing her fall. A judge decided in favour of the woman, based on the assumption that "Peng must be at fault. Otherwise why would he want to help?", saying that Peng acted against "common sense". The outcry from the public in support of Peng forced the court to adjust its verdict and resulted in Peng paying 10% of the costs instead of the total. Since that incident Peng has become a national cautionary tale: the Good Samaritan being framed by the beneficiary of their compassion.
( ^ It's tempting to see the judge's reasoning as 'typically Chinese' in itself--in Confucianist societies altruism is generally assumed to stem from specific allegiances, most notably familial ones, and as for the '10% compromise,' that sounds like classic 'face-saving,' as opposed to abstract-principle-based, moral thinking.)
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The fundamental problem, in my view, lies in one word that describes a state of mind: shaoguanxianshi, meaning don't get involved if it's not your business. In our culture, there's a lack of willingness to show compassion to strangers. We are brought up to show kindness to people in our network of guanxi, family and friends and business associates, but not particularly to strangers, especially if such kindness may potentially damage your interest.

Fei Xiaotong, China's first sociologist, described Chinese people's moral and ethical characteristics in his book, "From the Soil," in the middle of the last century. He pointed out that selfishness is the most serious shortcoming of the Chinese. "When we think of selfishness, we think of the proverb 'Each person should sweep the snow from his own doorsteps and should not fret about the frost on his neighbour's roof,'" wrote Fei. He offered the example of how the Chinese of that period threw rubbish out of their windows without the slightest public concern.

...Under Mao, citizens were forced to behave themselves in both public and private spheres. Every March, people were obliged to go into the street to do good deeds: cleaning buses, fixing bicycles and offering haircuts. Now relaxed social control and commercialisation over the past three decades have led people to behave more selfishly again. People are enjoying, and sometimes abusing, the vast personal freedoms that didn't exist before.

...Last year an article, "Why have Chinese lost their sense of morality?", in which the author tried to find an explanation, was widely read. He reasoned that China has introduced the concept of a market economy from the west but failed to import the corresponding ethics, while the traditional moral principles of China no longer fit the market economy model. There's a lot of sense in that. I believe that the lack of a value system is also deepening the moral crisis. Before Mao, the indifference towards others once so accurately described by Fei existed but was mitigated by a traditional moral and religious system. That system was then almost destroyed by the communists, especially during the 10 mad years of the Cultural Revolution from 1966 to 1976. Nowadays communism, the ideology that dominated Chinese people's lives like a religion, has also more or less collapsed. As a result, there's a spiritual vacuum that cannot be filled by the mere opportunity of money-making.

To drag China out of its moral crisis will be a long battle. The pressing question is how to make people act in cases of emergency and the solution is law. After the "Nanjing case", there have been discussions about introducing a law that imposes a "duty of rescue" as exists in many European countries. I am all for it, because that's probably the only way to propel action for a people who do not see a moral obligation in rescuing others.
When I was living in Hong Kong a couple years back, I had an experience where I went to take a shortcut through one of the underground shopping arcades abutting the MTR (subway lines), and walked right into a scene where three boys in their mid-teens were beating the crap out of another boy, who was staggering and clearly already hurt--all while about a dozen random bystanders (men and women, all ages and sizes) stood there gawking, making no attempt to intervene or even call for help. My reaction (which safetywise wasn't the smartest, but the teacher in me just took over) was to charge over shouting at them, "What the hell are you doing?!" and then "STOP." The first time they paused and one of them stopped altogether; the second time all three stopped, eyed me warily, then ran off. Only when I asked the injured boy if he was okay did one of the bystanders finally step forward and offer to call for help.

Granted, that's a very different situation from the 'Yueyue story;' in fact, I could imagine it happening here in the US too, and I don't even think it necessarily revealed much of anything about those bystanders. The majority of people do respond to shocking sights by freezing up, which while sometimes tragic in consequence is basically just human instinct, not a reliable reflection on moral character. (I can't remember whether or not there were other passers-by who just kept walking.) Even so, it still bothers me that even given the safety of numbers, none of those bystanders called for help, no one yelled at them to stop, some of the men were definitely bigger than those kids and could've pulled them apart...Then when I read something like the above, it makes me wonder all over again what exactly I was seeing in their inaction.
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Old 10-26-2011, 09:22 AM   #78
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Thanks, I'll read through that. The real shock to me is that any human being could do that to a baby. That, and the video itself just seemed much better quality that we're used to seeing (choppy black and white CCTV, or stuff you just never get to see). I am not easily alarmed or scandalized and after watching that video (having not previously heard about it so no idea what it was going to be) I stared at a wall for a few minutes and then just got up and left work. It was just so shallow and depraved, what you actually see on the video, even before the commentary on the ethics and culture. I know very few Chinese people and have never been to that part of the world or studied it in any depth so I don't feel I can weigh in on the cultural aspect. What I saw was a baby get squished multiple times and lie there in a pool of blood while people swerved out of the way.

I can understand people locking up in this type of situation, but it looked like some of those people barely did a double-take, didn't glance down but steered their bike out of the way, like they almost *expected* their to be a dying baby in their way. This is part of the reason why I take CPR, AED, and First Aid at least once a year. I've been in situations albeit a LOT less drastic where I have felt myself want to freeze or walk the other way. I already know all the procedures and how to use the equipment and the current standards for performing CPR but I really need to go through the motions as much as possible so I could do what I should do without freezing up. I am very much a risk-averse, stay-out-of-people's-business kind of person. Since I know that about myself I have to push myself to be able to overcome that.
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Old 10-26-2011, 04:38 PM   #79
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^ Yeah, I more think of the First Aid training I've had in terms of maximizing what I might do to help someone in trouble, but I do also value the idea that being drilled in it makes the response automatic so you don't freeze up. Everyone's different, for me I'd be most worried about freezing up if I'm alone, whereas if there's a whole group of panicked people around, that tends to galvanize me.

It is probably easy to overstate the 'cultural' component to the Yueyue story (haven't watched the video and don't want to); when I first read about it, it did vaguely remind me of these stories you occasionally hear out of NYC/LA/wherever where some homeless person whose serious medical distress should have been obvious--blueing skin, bleeding mouth etc.--was instead allowed to just keep lying on the sidewalk, people stepping indifferently around them despite in some cases appearing to notice, and wound up dying because the ingrained response to just ignore 'bums' won out for the passers-by. Again, very different situation but perhaps similar enough for discomfort. I agree, freezing up is a lot easier to understand than just proceeding on by as if there were nothing here to worry yourself about.
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Old 11-01-2011, 10:46 PM   #80
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On my twitter feed at the moment there is a video of a judge from Aransas beating his daughter with a belt. Apparently this was secretly taken by his daughter in 2004 when she was 16 and she has now posted this to youtube herself to seemingly expose her father.

Not sure about the context of why now etc but the video appears disturbingly real. I was smacked as a child but this is more akin to a violent assault.

Some of the comments on this reddit link provide a bit more context as well as a link to video on youtube. It is very unpleasant though.

Family law judge beats own daughter for using the internet, please spread : reddit.com
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Old 11-02-2011, 04:28 PM   #81
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Husband of falling shopping cart victim Marion Hedges says her recovery will be difficult - Crimesider - CBS News

(CBS/WCBS) NEW YORK - The husband of a New York woman injured by a falling shopping cart says his wife will survive but has a difficult road ahead of her.

Marion Salmon Hedges was critically injured Sunday night after two 12-year-old boys allegedly threw a shopping cart over the fourth-floor railing at an East Harlem shopping complex. The 47-year-old Upper West Side Realtor had been walking underneath with her son after buying Halloween candy.

"What I can tell you is she's not well," Hedges' husband Michael told CBS station WCBS.

Michael Hedges told the station that his wife will survive but, due to damage to her brain, she will have a difficult recovery.

"Her prognosis at a minimum involves many months of painful rehabilitation," Michael said.

Michael Hedges says, "There's not a lot we can do right now. It's with the doctor and with fate's hands."

When asked how angry he was at the two boys, WCBS reports Michael said, "They're not adults. They're children, and children who have been left on their own without supervision."

The 12-year-old boys have been charged with felony assault and misdemeanor criminal possession of a weapon.

WCBS spoke to one of the boys' family members Tuesday.

"We feel real bad for the whole situation and the family and what she's going through. I can't imagine what her family and kids are going through, but we're also going through something, too," the family member said.

Hedges, who the Daily News reports volunteers at the Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center, is reportedly in critical but stable condition at New York City's Harlem Hospital.
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Old 11-03-2011, 12:29 PM   #82
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Toronto Star

Doctors at Queen’s University thought they were going nuts when they saw what appeared to be the outline of a man’s face staring back at them in an ultrasound image of a tumour.

Drs. Naji Touma and Gregory Roberts were scrolling through images of a testicular tumour on a computer when they did a double take.

“It was very ghoulish, like a man screaming in pain. His mouth was open and it looked like one eye was gouged out,” said Touma, a professor at Queen’s University Medical School and urologist at Kingston General Hospital.

The ultrasound image, taken in December 2009, was sent to the journal Urology and recently published under the tongue-in-cheek headline, “The face of testicular pain: A surprising ultrasound finding.”

“A brief debate ensued on whether the image could have been a sign from the deity (perhaps “Min” the Egyptian god of male virility); however, the consensus deemed it a mere coincidental occurrence rather than a divine proclamation,” the accompanying article said.

The ultrasound was taken after a 45-year-old man complained of discomfort. A 6 cm. growth turned out to be a benign tumour, the result of an infection, and the testicle was removed.

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Old 11-03-2011, 01:17 PM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LJT View Post
On my twitter feed at the moment there is a video of a judge from Aransas beating his daughter with a belt. Apparently this was secretly taken by his daughter in 2004 when she was 16 and she has now posted this to youtube herself to seemingly expose her father.

Not sure about the context of why now etc but the video appears disturbingly real. I was smacked as a child but this is more akin to a violent assault.

Some of the comments on this reddit link provide a bit more context as well as a link to video on youtube. It is very unpleasant though.

Family law judge beats own daughter for using the internet, please spread : reddit.com
Now this is showing up on all the major news sites. Sadly, some of the comments I've read might be worse than the actual video!
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:34 PM   #84
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A California woman was sexually assaulted by her husband, and caught the whole thing on tape. He went to jail, but when he gets out, a judge has ruled that she'll have to pay him alimony.

10News has Crystal Harris's description of the night her now ex-husband Shawn forced her to perform oral sex on him:

He wanted to have sex and I said no. He kept saying this is not up for negotiation. When I finally realized that I had no choice, I mean, he was pushing my head down; I finally talked him into letting me go to the bathroom. I realize I've got that tape recorder not far from where we are right now.

Shawn Harris claimed the whole thing was part of consensual sexual role-playing — he said they liked to act out infidelity, "hooker and pimp," and "Tarzan and Jane" scenarios. But the tape, in which Crystal Harris said "no" fifty times, and Shawn's prior history of domestic abuse and anger issues, led to a conviction for forced oral copulation. Harris was sentenced to six years in prison — but when he gets out, his wife will have to start paying him $1,000 a month in spousal support. Judge Gregory Pollock cited her much higher income: "I can't look at a 12-year marriage where one side is making $400 a month, the other side is making over $11,000 and say no spousal support."

Crystal Harris, understandably, is outraged that she will have to support the man who assaulted her: "It makes me feel victimized all over again that I should have to pay a dime to this man who has turned my life upside down." She added, "No rape victim should have to pay her rapist." But in California, being convicted of rape doesn't cancel out your entitlement to spousal support — only trying to murder your spouse does. Crystal Harris wants to change that — and so does San Diego County DA Bonnie Dumanis.

She's urging legislators to change the spousal support law, which would be a good thing for everyone. Many resources for abuse survivors seem to offer advice for extracting support from a non-paying spouse, but not for stopping payment to an abusive one. Stereotype might dictate that breadwinners are more likely to be rapists, but neither making money nor committing sexual assault are exclusively male acts. And no one who's been raped, male or female, should have to pay their attacker.
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Old 11-09-2011, 10:44 AM   #85
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WASHINGTON — The Dover military mortuary entrusted with the solemn duty of receiving and caring for America's war dead twice lost body parts of remains shipped home from Afghanistan, the Air Force revealed Tuesday.

Three mortuary supervisors have been punished for what the Air Force called "gross mismanagement," but no one was fired in a grisly case reminiscent of the scandalous mishandling and misidentifying of remains at Arlington National Cemetery.

The Air Force, which runs the mortuary at Dover, Del., acknowledged failures while insisting it made the right decision in not informing families linked to the missing body parts until last weekend – months after it completed a probe of 14 sets of allegations lodged by three members of the mortuary staff.

Gen. Norton Schwartz, the Air Force chief of staff, told a Pentagon news conference he and the service's top civilian, Michael Donley, are ultimately responsible for what happens at Dover and for its mistakes.

"There's no escaping it," Schwartz said.

However, an independent federal investigative agency, the Office of Special Counsel, said the Air Force had fallen short on accountability. That office, which forwarded the original whistleblower allegations to the Pentagon in May and July 2010 and reviewed the subsequent Air Force investigative report, faulted it for taking an overly narrow view of what went wrong at Dover between 2008 and 2010.

"Several of the Air Force's findings are not supported by the evidence presented and thus do not appear reasonable," the special counsel's office said. "In these instances the report demonstrates a pattern of the Air Force's failure to acknowledge culpability for wrongdoing relating to the treatment of remains."

Special Counsel Carolyn Lerner said her office is investigating allegations by the three whistleblowers that the Air Force retaliated against them in several ways, including an attempt to fire one of them.

The three whistleblowers still work at Dover. They are James Parsons, an embalming/autopsy technician; Mary Ellen Spera, a mortuary inspector; and William Zwicharowski, a senior mortuary inspector.

There is no suggestion of criminal wrongdoing at Dover, and the Air Force said it found no evidence that those faulted at Dover had deliberately mishandled any remains. They attributed the mistakes largely to a breakdown in procedures and a failure to fix problems that had been building over time.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta issued a statement saying he was "deeply disturbed" by the matter. Panetta said he supports the Air Force's findings but has asked a separate panel of the Defense Health Board, a Pentagon advisory group, to conduct its own review of how the Dover mortuary is run. That review, to be led by former surgeon general Dr. Richard Carmona, is due within 60 days.

As gruesome as the revelations appear, Schwartz acknowledged that it's possible that mistakes also were made prior to 2008, during a period when U.S. troops were killed at even higher rates in Iraq. Other Air Force officials said on Monday they knew of no prior cases of mishandled remains at Dover.

"I cannot certify with certainty that prior performance met our standard of perfection," Schwartz told reporters.

At Dover all U.S. war dead are received in well-practiced procedures that place a premium on a dignified and respectful handling of remains. Medical examiners then carry out procedures to positively identify remains and determine the cause of death. Teams of morticians and embalmers then prepare the remains for disposition. Investigators found a disconnect between the work of the medical examiners and the morticians, each of which reports to a different military chain of command.

One of the two cases of missing parts was in April 2009. It involved fragments of ankle bone embedded in human tissue associated with two crew members recovered from an Air Force F-15 fighter that crashed in Afghanistan. The labeled plastic bag containing this portion of remains was found empty during normal processing, with a slit in the side of the bag. Staff members were unable to account for the missing piece.

The other instance was in July 2009 and involved a piece of human tissue an inch or two in length associated with a soldier killed in Afghanistan. As in the April case, the bag containing the piece was found empty, with a slit in its side. The piece of missing tissue was never located.

Officials said that in no cases do they suspect foul play, criminal acts or deliberate mishandling of the missing pieces.

Two of the three officials who were punished still work at Dover but not in supervisory jobs. None was fired.

In reviewing the Air Force's probe, the Office of Special Counsel disputed the conclusion that none of the allegations of mishandling of remains amounted to violations of law or regulation. The special counsel submitted its own report Tuesday to the White House and to the House and Senate armed services committees.

The special counsel's office contradicted the Air Force's claim that it was taking full responsibility.

"While the report reflects a willingness to find paperwork violations and errors, with the exception of the cases of missing portions (of remains), the findings stop short of accepting accountability for failing to handle remains with the requisite `reverence, care and dignity befitting them and the circumstances,'" it said.

In addition to the two cases of lost body pieces, the Air Force reviewed allegations that mortuary officials acted improperly in sawing off an arm bone that protruded from the body of a Marine in a way that prevented his body from being placed in his uniform for viewing before burial. The Marine's family had requested seeing him in his uniform but was not consulted about – or told of – the decision to remove the bone.

The Marine, whose identity was not released by the Air Force, was killed by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan in January 2010.

The Air Force inspector general began his investigation in June 2010 and finished it in May 2011. It concluded that the mortuary had not violated any rule or regulation by removing the Marine's bone as it did. But the Air Force has since changed procedures to ensure that a representative of the deceased's service – in this case the Marine Corps – has a formal say in whether the family should be contacted before altering the body so significantly.

A total of four families affected directly by the investigation were told of it last weekend by Air Force officials.

The three supervisors at Dover who were disciplined are Col. Robert H. Edmondson, who was in overall command of the Air Force Mortuary Affairs Operations at Dover at the time; Trevor Dean, who was Edmondson's top civilian deputy; and Quinton "Randy" Keel, director of the mortuary division at Dover.

All three declined Tuesday, through the Air Force's office of public affairs, to comment for this story.

Edmondson, who had already rotated out of the Dover job by the time the Air Force probe was over, has been given a letter of reprimand, which makes it unlikely he will get a future promotion. Schwartz said the colonel was deliberately put in a staff, rather than command, job in the Pentagon. Dean and Keel, who are licensed morticians, were dropped a notch in their civilian pay grade and reassigned at Dover.
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Old 11-09-2011, 12:19 PM   #86
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Sounds like a Kathy Reichs novel ("Spider Bones").
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Old 11-09-2011, 07:09 PM   #87
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Gerry Sandusky.

That's all I need to say.
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Old 11-09-2011, 07:16 PM   #88
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^ Same syndrome as the Catholic Church, protect your brand and your own rather than the victims.
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Old 11-09-2011, 10:56 PM   #89
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Is anyone watching the news right now, particularly CNN?

The students of Penn State are protesting against Joe Paterno's dismissal. I hope I am misinterpreting what I am seeing on the screen, but it really looks like that. Don't these kids realize that Paterno was part of the cover up of Sandusky raping young boys? Or all they care about is Penn State sports?
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Old 11-09-2011, 11:02 PM   #90
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Penn State is 8 -1

they are in the top 20, number 12
they are having a heck of a season, this is not a good time to make a coaching change.
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